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Late 60's Bianchi Specialissima project thread

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Late 60's Bianchi Specialissima project thread

Old 09-05-17, 03:46 AM
  #1  
styggno1
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Late 60's Bianchi Specialissima project thread

I already have a Bianchi Specialissima project thread going:
https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vi...ct-thread.html
But as always with projects there are times when things has to dry, sit or just need to be contemplated. That time I use to prepare for the next project.

With this Bianchi I am going to do something that is against my very nature. And it hurts. But in a good way…

My normal instincts say that this frame needs to be restored. New paint and decals.

But.

I already have bikes that are in a nice original condition and others that I have restored to “as new” condition. I need to expand my mind a bit. I need a bike that is left just the way it is – more or less.

This, I have decided, will be it. Here is a couple (at least) of reasons:

1. This bike is somewhat unusual. It is a late 60ies - up to around 1970 Bianchi Specialissima. There are not many around. I have only found a couple on the net with the same type of decals.

For a while I got confused over the “165” serial. Pointing to it being from 1965. Since then I have learnt that Bianchi likely brazed a batch of frames and then finished them by demand – long after 1965. Or another possibility being pre-stamped seatlugs with 165 used for later frame builds. Any way - there are examples of verified bikes sold at least up to around 1970 with earlier serials and later decals – and frame details. In the first case (batch theory) there must also have been some modifying taking place as a 1965 frame would not take, for instance, Campagnolo Record brakes (1967-68). Mine does. And others similar to it. A 1965 frame would need longer reaching brakes. We will probably never know for sure to a 100 percent about anything taking place at an Italian maker of this time (or later)… I do however have a “164” Bianchi Specialissima too and the rear brake bridge on that one is way further up the stays.

Reason 2. Apart from the missing paint there is no rust except a few very small pinhead spots on head lugs and fork crown. So it is missing paint on quite large portions… but it has obviously not been standing outside long enough for it to corrode. Will it be standing out in the rain under my ownership? No.

Reason 3. In a world of repainted vintage bikes – would it not be nice to - in the future - be able to see one in its original and battered state?

(You may see I clearly need to convince myself here…)

Reason 4. If, I say if, I in the future would like (and be fit enough) to participate in an L´Eroica event – I need a bike that is classic, usable, good looking and authentic. With its Record and Nuovo Record parts it is perfect for it. Spare parts I have en masse. Its appearance – or lack of it – means I do not need to pamper it religiously. A lot like myself…

Reason 5. I do have a 1(9)64 Bianchi Specialissima with all new chrome. Planned with a celeste paint job. Why have two of almost the same? Why not show the contrast?

Reason 6. I give up. I have a gazillion reasons for this frame to be left as it is. I will bother you no further than with these.

I bought it locally here in Sweden for 1200 kronor which is about 126 USD. Locally does not mean close by though. The seller did not want to send it but a couple of real gentlemen I got to know thru a bike site over here - “Fixedgear” - helped me by picking it up and even transport it to me. I am forever grateful. Thanks!

It had a lot of parts that did not belong on it but I have come to believe the Campagnolo parts and the 3ttt Gran Prix bar and stem probably do. The no circlip front derailleur ( up to circa 1970), long reach curved brake handles, etc. They fit the bill for a late 60ies-1970 bike.

Here are some pictures. It had obviously been used as an everyday bike for a while. The seller knew it had been used for competition earlier and he gave me some leads to by whom but my investigations has not turned anything up as of yet.

Seller’s picture:



My pictures:







I am going to reuse some of the Campagnolo parts and add period parts where missing. I do have drilled chainrings, gear levers, brakes, brake levers, and rear derailleur parts. This bike would be a fitting use for those. I am going for a Gran Prix or early version 3ttt Record stem and 3TTT bar or a Cinelli 1A stem and bar combo – I have not decided yet. I have them all so it will not be a big problem. A Brooks Professional saddle - I know for sure. A “Patent” only Nuovo Record rear derailleur fits it well. High flange Record hubs on Mavic MA2 rims and 25 or 28 Vittoria Corsa clinchers for their good looks and user friendliness. I have a white Silca Impero for a Campagnolo band on holder which makes me think white cotton bar wrap. TA steel bottle cage (white plastic fitting – but more yellowish actually). White cable housing. White, Alfredo Binda toe clip straps. White is so practical… But in this case I believe it to be a good choice as the white parts will soon be looking dirty and used and therefore complementing the frame condition well.

Maybe not giving it back its glory - I will however thoroughly enjoy putting this bike together and resurrecting it – giving it, at least, back its honor. Even if I started this post by saying “it hurts”…

Last edited by styggno1; 07-22-18 at 02:34 PM.
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Old 09-05-17, 05:19 AM
  #2  
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Subscribed, as usual for your threads. Leaving it original, with the patina left in place, is becoming more and more popular, as many say this about the trend, "its only original once." Much of your approach fits my viewpoint about restoration, so this one is going to be a gathering of pointers for future projects here.

Anxiously awaiting the progress, along with your other thread thats ongoing, You sure are a busy little beaver.

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Old 09-05-17, 05:24 AM
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It's a beautiful bike to work with. I agree with the decision to not do a repaint. I've restored numerous bikes from that era, and with a little time and careful work you can touch-up even larger areas and graphics like you have there.
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Old 09-05-17, 05:42 AM
  #4  
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Beautiful post. Pure poetry.i salute you

Originally Posted by styggno1 View Post
I already have a Bianchi Specialissima project thread going:
https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vi...ct-thread.html
But as always with projects there are times when things has to dry, sit or just need to be contemplated. That time I use to prepare for the next project.

With this Bianchi I am going to do something that is against my very nature. And it hurts. But in a good way…

My normal instincts say that this frame needs to be restored. New paint and decals.

But.

I already have bikes that are in a nice original condition and others that I have restored to “as new” condition. I need to expand my mind a bit. I need a bike that is left just the way it is – more or less.

This, I have decided, will be it. Here is a couple (at least) of reasons:

1. This bike is somewhat unusual. It is a late 60ies - up to around 1970 Bianchi Specialissima. There are not many around. I have only found a couple on the net with the same type of decals.

For a while I got confused over the “165” serial. Pointing to it being from 1965. Since then I have learnt that Bianchi likely brazed a batch of frames and then finished them by demand – long after 1965. Or another possibility being pre-stamped seatlugs with 165 used for later frame builds. Any way - there are examples of verified bikes sold at least up to around 1970 with earlier serials and later decals – and frame details. In the first case (batch theory) there must also have been some modifying taking place as a 1965 frame would not take, for instance, Campagnolo Record brakes (1967). Mine does. And others similar to it. A 1965 frame would need longer reaching brakes. We will probably never know for sure to a 100 percent about anything taking place at an Italian maker of this time (or later)… I do however have a “164” Bianchi Specialissima too and the rear brake bridge on that one is way further up the stays.

Reason 2. Apart from the missing paint there is no rust except a few very small pinhead spots on head lugs and fork crown. So it is missing paint on quite large portions… but it has obviously not been standing outside long enough for it to corrode. Will it be standing out in the rain under my ownership? No.

Reason 3. In a world of repainted vintage bikes – would it not be nice to - in the future - be able to see one in its original and battered state?

(You may see I clearly need to convince myself here…)

Reason 4. If, I say if, I in the future would like (and be fit enough) to participate in an L´Eroica event – I need a bike that is classic, usable, good looking and authentic. With its Record and Nuovo Record parts it is perfect for it. Spare parts I have en masse. Its appearance – or lack of it – means I do not need to pamper it religiously. A lot like myself…

Reason 5. I do have a 1(9)64 Bianchi Specialissima with all new chrome. Planned with a celeste paint job. Why have two of almost the same? Why not show the contrast?

Reason 6. I give up. I have a gazillion reasons for this frame to be left as it is. I will bother you no further than with these.

I bought it locally here in Sweden for 1200 kronor which is about 126 USD. Locally does not mean close by though. The seller did not want to send it but a couple of real gentlemen I got to know thru a bike site over here - “Fixedgear” - helped me by picking it up and even transport it to me. I am forever grateful. Thanks!

It had a lot of parts that did not belong on it but I have come to believe the Campagnolo parts and the 3ttt Gran Prix bar and stem probably do. The no circlip front derailleur ( up to circa 1970), long reach curved brake handles, etc. They fit the bill for a late 60ies-1970 bike.

Here are some pictures. It had obviously been used as an everyday bike for a while. The seller knew it had been used for competition earlier and he gave me some leads to by whom but my investigations has not turned anything up as of yet.

Seller’s picture:



My pictures:







I am going to reuse some of the Campagnolo parts and add period parts where missing. I do have drilled chainrings, gear levers, brakes, brake levers, and rear derailleur parts. This bike would be a fitting use for those. I am going for a Gran Prix or early version 3ttt Record stem and 3TTT bar or a Cinelli 1A stem and bar combo – I have not decided yet. I have them all so it will not be a big problem. A Brooks Professional saddle - I know for sure. A “Patent” only Nuovo Record rear derailleur fits it well. High flange Record hubs on Mavic MA2 rims and 25 or 28 Vittoria Corsa clinchers for their good looks and user friendliness. I have a white Silca Impero for a Campagnolo band on holder which makes me think white cotton bar wrap. TA steel bottle cage (white plastic fitting – but more yellowish actually). White cable housing. White, Alfredo Binda toe clip straps. White is so practical… But in his case I believe it to be a good choice as the white parts will soon be looking dirty and used and therefore complementing the frame condition well.

Maybe not giving it back its glory - I will however thoroughly enjoy putting this bike together and resurrecting it – giving it, at least, back its honor. Even if I started this post by saying “it hurts”…
One of the best posts I've read in a very long time. Enjoy your project.
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Old 09-05-17, 01:00 PM
  #5  
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Your different handling of your two Bianchis parallels what I am doing with the Capo Modell Campagnolo (full CyclArt repaint, slightly updated components) versus the much rarer top-of-the-line Capo Sieger (original paint, except the head tube, where the enamel was flaking off, all original components except rims and spokes).
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Old 09-05-17, 02:30 PM
  #6  
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Originally Posted by styggno1 View Post
I already have a Bianchi Specialissima project thread going:
https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vi...ct-thread.html
But as always with projects there are times when things has to dry, sit or just need to be contemplated. That time I use to prepare for the next project.

With this Bianchi I am going to do something that is against my very nature. And it hurts. But in a good way…

My normal instincts say that this frame needs to be restored. New paint and decals.

But.

I already have bikes that are in a nice original condition and others that I have restored to “as new” condition. I need to expand my mind a bit. I need a bike that is left just the way it is – more or less.

This, I have decided, will be it. Here is a couple (at least) of reasons:

1. This bike is somewhat unusual. It is a late 60ies - up to around 1970 Bianchi Specialissima. There are not many around. I have only found a couple on the net with the same type of decals.

For a while I got confused over the “165” serial. Pointing to it being from 1965. Since then I have learnt that Bianchi likely brazed a batch of frames and then finished them by demand – long after 1965. Or another possibility being pre-stamped seatlugs with 165 used for later frame builds. Any way - there are examples of verified bikes sold at least up to around 1970 with earlier serials and later decals – and frame details. In the first case (batch theory) there must also have been some modifying taking place as a 1965 frame would not take, for instance, Campagnolo Record brakes (1967). Mine does. And others similar to it. A 1965 frame would need longer reaching brakes. We will probably never know for sure to a 100 percent about anything taking place at an Italian maker of this time (or later)… I do however have a “164” Bianchi Specialissima too and the rear brake bridge on that one is way further up the stays.

Reason 2. Apart from the missing paint there is no rust except a few very small pinhead spots on head lugs and fork crown. So it is missing paint on quite large portions… but it has obviously not been standing outside long enough for it to corrode. Will it be standing out in the rain under my ownership? No.

Reason 3. In a world of repainted vintage bikes – would it not be nice to - in the future - be able to see one in its original and battered state?

(You may see I clearly need to convince myself here…)

Reason 4. If, I say if, I in the future would like (and be fit enough) to participate in an L´Eroica event – I need a bike that is classic, usable, good looking and authentic. With its Record and Nuovo Record parts it is perfect for it. Spare parts I have en masse. Its appearance – or lack of it – means I do not need to pamper it religiously. A lot like myself…

Reason 5. I do have a 1(9)64 Bianchi Specialissima with all new chrome. Planned with a celeste paint job. Why have two of almost the same? Why not show the contrast?

Reason 6. I give up. I have a gazillion reasons for this frame to be left as it is. I will bother you no further than with these.

I bought it locally here in Sweden for 1200 kronor which is about 126 USD. Locally does not mean close by though. The seller did not want to send it but a couple of real gentlemen I got to know thru a bike site over here - “Fixedgear” - helped me by picking it up and even transport it to me. I am forever grateful. Thanks!

It had a lot of parts that did not belong on it but I have come to believe the Campagnolo parts and the 3ttt Gran Prix bar and stem probably do. The no circlip front derailleur ( up to circa 1970), long reach curved brake handles, etc. They fit the bill for a late 60ies-1970 bike.

Here are some pictures. It had obviously been used as an everyday bike for a while. The seller knew it had been used for competition earlier and he gave me some leads to by whom but my investigations has not turned anything up as of yet.

Seller’s picture:



My pictures:







I am going to reuse some of the Campagnolo parts and add period parts where missing. I do have drilled chainrings, gear levers, brakes, brake levers, and rear derailleur parts. This bike would be a fitting use for those. I am going for a Gran Prix or early version 3ttt Record stem and 3TTT bar or a Cinelli 1A stem and bar combo – I have not decided yet. I have them all so it will not be a big problem. A Brooks Professional saddle - I know for sure. A “Patent” only Nuovo Record rear derailleur fits it well. High flange Record hubs on Mavic MA2 rims and 25 or 28 Vittoria Corsa clinchers for their good looks and user friendliness. I have a white Silca Impero for a Campagnolo band on holder which makes me think white cotton bar wrap. TA steel bottle cage (white plastic fitting – but more yellowish actually). White cable housing. White, Alfredo Binda toe clip straps. White is so practical… But in his case I believe it to be a good choice as the white parts will soon be looking dirty and used and therefore complementing the frame condition well.

Maybe not giving it back its glory - I will however thoroughly enjoy putting this bike together and resurrecting it – giving it, at least, back its honor. Even if I started this post by saying “it hurts”…
You have great taste...always love what you post. I'm generally pro-patina as my bias, and I fully support your strategy. She still looks good...well loved...in my mind. Get her running, as I know you will, and I look forward to the photos.
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Old 09-05-17, 06:27 PM
  #7  
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That is one nice bike. The patina is what makes it beautiful and look its age in a positive way. You are making the right choice. If that bike were mine I wouldn't even consider a repaint.
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Old 09-06-17, 02:55 PM
  #8  
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Put in some hours after work today. Very satisfying evening.

Started, as usual, with a thorough cleaning (before work this morning). Put the frame and fork on a warm electric radiator to get it to dry out completely. Got home from work. Used a rubbing compound (I believe it is called claying by some). A gently abrasive compound that removes oxidized paint, small scratches and such. In this I stayed clear of the decals as they obviously are prone to wear. The frame had some strange green paint spills on it that I removed by gently scraping it off with a razor blade. I also had to remove some more of the celeste paint that was too loose to be left there. Decals, fairly recent (90ies), from our Swedish annual 300 km race “Vätternrundan” and some other decals that had nothing to do with this frame was also removed. And as a last step I waxed it. The shine came out nicely (on what paint that was left…). There are no dings at all on this frame. I hate dings in tubes and that was one of the things I really got the seller to check for – but until I had it in my hands could not be completely sure of.


¨



Headset. These integrated headsets may all look the same if not studying them closely. There are several different versions though. On the top of the line Bianchi frames they were made by Campagnolo. I have not seen a Specialissima with anything other than Campagnolo made headset parts. Within the Campagnolo headsets there seem to be some small variations too as this one differs from the one on my “164”.




Mysterious “M dot”


I did not take any pictures of it but these headsets use 3,15 mm (1/8) loose ball bearings. A lot of them. A lot.

Mood pic from the crypt.



For those of you wondering if I do not have a life… I do. After 50 years in the city I now live very rural. Work in a nearby town but evenings are spent “out in the woods”. I am not much for television and my wife works and sleeps over in another town Mondays to Thursdays. What can I say… I have a 100 square meter garage and a lot of bikes. And time.
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Old 09-06-17, 03:04 PM
  #9  
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I foolishly passed on one of these last year, it was a bit too far of a drive for me at the time. It had a Bianchi crankset on it, I kept some of the photos from the ad, the seller told me it was from 1964.





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Old 09-07-17, 11:46 AM
  #10  
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Natural light calls for some new pictures. As I already had built a set of wheels for my "164" Bianchi and because of that project being put far in the future - the set can be used for this one for some time. Record high flange hubs, Mavic MA2 rims (without decals) and Vredestein foldable 25: s. The tires I am not sure of - I found them long ago but as mock up they suffice.







Last edited by styggno1; 09-07-17 at 11:54 AM.
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Old 07-16-18, 02:30 AM
  #11  
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Modus Operandi update

I have been longing to build this bike. I want to give it back its dignity. I want it to be like a tired, battle hardened and scarred hero that makes a comeback with success.

I mentioned early in this thread that this could become my Eroica Special if I get around to doing such a race. A bike that is guilt free, fully usable – and/but instantly recognized as a true vintage classic race bike from cycling’s golden era. This Bianchi is, in my view, the perfect candidate. It has heavy patina, it came to me incomplete and it was cheap. But it has its heart - and it is a big heart.

The build plan has changed since I started this thread but not by much. As I intend to use this bike I am going to carefully select vintage looking consumables that will be easy on my conscience compared to using the correct period parts. I will use modern tan wall clinchers (25 or 28) on likewise “modern but retro looking” H+Son TB14 rims, a NOS 80ies Sedis Gold chain, a late model Regina Extra freewheel, DT stainless spokes and a 70ies Brooks Professional saddle or a 70ies Ideale 90. Both of the saddles having almost no wear at all – it will be a tough choice.

Drillium will be a theme. Nothing extreme but enough to give it a bit of flair and personalization. I feel strangely excited (not in THAT way – but anyway) when handling old drilled parts. There is something part aesthetic, part romantic, part pre-historic technology about it. It was supposed to make the bike lighter… Enhancing performance. Frankly I believe it was done for psychological reasons mostly. And I like that. I also like both the exact spaced countersunk drillings done by professionals with the right equipment AND the sometimes fumbly but lovingly done holes performed by amateurs with a handheld drill. I just like it. Someone has taken their time and gone to great lengths to achieve something. Because of that I am going to use drilled parts that I have gathered during - 35 years. Some done by professionals and some done by amateurs. But all of it done back when this practice was in fashion. No newly drilled holes here.

Record and Nuovo Record parts

The bike had a period correct Record front derailleur, the version without the securing circlip, when I got it. However - I am going to use one with a circlip because of its obvious benefit of not coming half way off its pin and possibly hindering trouble free gear change in front.

When found the bike had a modern Shimano rear derailleur. I do have a spare pre 1970 “Patent” only rear Nuovo Record derailleur and it would of course be the correct one to use. I will instead use a “Patent -70” as it is drilled by someone back when. I stated earlier I want to use old drillium. And – I just cannot take a drill to a “Patent” only derailleur (and get death threats from fellow Campagnolophiles). The “patent -70” derailleur I got back in the 80ies and it has been lingering in my parts box since then. Its time has come to shine. It is not beautifully drilled but it has its brute charm.



For the gear lever assembly I will use everything that came with the bike but the levers which I substitute for drilled ones. Campagnolo cable guide at the bottom bracket shell and Campagnolo cables.

The bottom bracket will be the one that came with the frame. It is an early, “flat sided fixed cup”, rifled cups Nuovo Record BB. It is in perfect shape and order with silky smooth bearings. As I have a life time spare parts supply of Nuovo Record BB: s I do not have a bad conscience about using this one up. The Record crank arms are also the ones it came with. They have been to battle and it shows. I do however deem them safe. No cracks to be found in the usual places. The black infill on the spider arms gets to stay as it a part of this bikes history and something often done to old Bianchi: s.

Chainrings will be professionally drilled ones. I am a little concerned about two of these. They are currently on my 1974 Specialissima and they look good on that bike. They are NOS and it would hurt a bit to use them for real – they are pristine. Something else that will hurt if the NOS ones are used on this bike is my legs. They are 54/45… I would have liked to have 50/42. But maybe the drillium can make up for this…hehe. I do also have used ones in good condition that are 47 and 42. That might be the way to go for a hilly race and me as a 54 year old guy that has been in better shape. But a 47 big ring might not look right. It will be decided in the end when everything comes together. The looks of 54/45 rings are maybe not worth much if I have to walk to the finish.



The brakes and brake handles will be substituted. The brakes I am going to use are from a Crescent Pepita Special bought in the early 90ies. The bike was from around 1971-72 and I believe it was a one owner bike. Crescent Pepita Special came with centerpull brakes but Campagnolo Record could be ordered or chosen at select stores. The frame is long gone but I do have most of the parts still. Brakes are drilled in garage style fashion but quite nice.

The brakehandles come from another early 70ies Crescent bike. They are of the early “keyhole”, long reach, extra curved version that fits the bill for the Bianchi perfectly. Drilling is extensive and seems to have been done with some kind of plan. They are rough but nice. I will put in NOS plastic washers. To these I also plan to use my last set of NOS Campagnolo globe gum hoods. They are fresh and supple. I hope they will last my time. NOS Campagnolo cables and grey cable housing. NOS Campagnolo cable holders for the top tube. I am all out of chrome holders so they will be of the stainless variety.



Hubs are drilled enough as they are and will be left alone. They are 120 mm, 36 hole and I restored them years ago and they are ready to go. I do however have drilled quick release levers. They were a bit rusty in the holes but I have cleaned them and put some paint in the holes to prevent rust to continue spreading. Lacing them with DT spokes and to H+Son TB14 rims.

Pedals will be Record with steel Christophe clips and Alfredo Binda straps.

Seatpost is my “problem”. I do not own a drilled one. I can live with that. Water and dirt down the seat tube is not a good thing. I do not think the lack of drillium will cramp the style of the bike too much.

I plan for either a Cinelli bar with 1A stem (both old logo) or 3ttt Gran Prix bar and stem. The combos both have their plus and minus. My old logo Cinelli stems all have the recessed allen nut though and this one should have the exposed nut version. The 3ttt combo is period correct but the bars are too narrow for my liking. Either way I choose it will be white cotton bar wrap used. Double wrapped.

I have bottle cages both for the frame and for the bar. It looks more vintage with on the bars mounting and/but I feel more for frame mounted and that was the norm in the peloton at this time frame. I will use a chrome TA cage.

Frame mounted Silca pump with Campagnolo head and pump peg.

I will try to update regulary.

Last edited by styggno1; 07-16-18 at 06:06 AM.
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Old 07-16-18, 06:16 AM
  #12  
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Keep ups posted. Great bike, in good hands.

I am glad you got rid of that hideous-looking monstrosity of a rear derailleur.
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Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324
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Old 07-21-18, 03:46 PM
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Bottom bracket going in today. Went smoothly - which - is no surprise. Parallell sides on shell and clean threads in both shell and on BB. Spins nicely.





This is what I mentioned earlier - Campagnolo correcting a construction flaw on the Record front derailleur.

A clip was added to the upper pivot post to prevent the arm from coming off. Later circlip version to the right.



At the same time they beefed up the pivot post base. Later circlip version to the left (to confuse you all). I have got a drilled derailleur band base which is going to be used - together with parts (the cage, etc) from this - the left one.



Here is a picture of my 1971 Ferretti Masi/Monark where the problem shows clearly.



I do not want that and this is why I opt for the later version.

Tomorrow there are going to be a lot of cleaning done.

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Old 07-21-18, 11:36 PM
  #14  
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My first road bike in 1972 came with the pre cir-clip front derailleur... I felt disheartened when it started contorting.
Not as bad as your worst example, but in 1974 I bought the updated body with the clip and transferred parts. I felt every upshift would be its last.
I did feel a bit let down. I was told at the time if I took the sorry part to the Campagnolo support van that would pop up at races from time to time they would provide a free exchange.
When I later saw that the original design had screws retaining the arms.... not happy with the design simplification.

I like the project you have assembling.
I have been slowly trying to revive paint on a bike from 1972 at present, the pin striping has made the effort very slow, no clear coat, so I have masked it off and polished the paint to either side, slow going as there are non linear segments that require curve matching, twice.
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Old 07-22-18, 09:26 AM
  #15  
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What is it with early Campag. front derailleurs? I have had two of the old pushrod Gran Sports with excessive slop caused by wear in the bore of the body, and now you guys are educating me about the flimsiness of some of the early swing-arm Records.
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Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324
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Old 07-22-18, 09:46 AM
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Words I now have to take back:
"The Record crank arms are also the ones it came with. They have been to battle and it shows. I do however deem them safe. No cracks to be found in the usual places."

Hahaha (crazy laugh)! Never check for cracks on a very dirty crank. Lesson to be learned here...

Today was cleaning day. The parts were quite dirty and I had to use both degreaser and a stiff brush before giving them the ultrasonic bath spa treatment.



And looky here:




This crank is now retired to being a table top conversation piece.

Luckily I happen to have a lonely orphan drive side crank. In better overall condition (no cracks of course), the same lenght - and also from pre date code time. That is fortunate!




I am going to take a fine file and round the edges at the crack prone sharp edge at the spider. Stress relieving work both for me and for the crank.

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Old 07-22-18, 12:02 PM
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"I am going to take a fine file and round the edges at the crack prone sharp edge at the spider. Stress relieving work both for me and for the crank."

This is/can be key, nothing better than finding a fatal flaw and being able to rectify it summarily out of hand, part or whatever in stock, tools, knowledge and capability to solve the dilemma without further ado = priceless.

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Old 07-22-18, 04:08 PM
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Originally Posted by merziac View Post
"I am going to take a fine file and round the edges at the crack prone sharp edge at the spider. Stress relieving work both for me and for the crank."

This is/can be key, nothing better than finding a fatal flaw and being able to rectify it summarily out of hand, part or whatever in stock, tools, knowledge and capability to solve the dilemma without further ado = priceless.
I agree - blueprinting, modifying or just tweaking things, a engine or any mehanical part, is very satisfying and it can make a big difference.

This area of the classic Record drive side crank is known to fail. The sharp edges acts as a stress riser (this is difficult in English - not my native language), and the area is also challenging in the forging process, and as pedal power is applied cracks can develop. I have cranks that has been put thru elite and powerful cycling and nothing has happened and I have cranks that I have bought new and used myself that has failed. It is a area that has to be checked regularly.



Here I have started to smooth the sharp edge (green arrow).



Apart from stress relieving the drive side crank I also measured the spider, the five arms, for any wobble. I had to correct two of them a little to get the rings to go perfectly straight. This is a practise I have done for many years and I would not recommend doing it if not absolutely sure about what to do and how to do it. Got to have a "feeling" for the material and what force to apply. Not for the faint of heart.

Today I also checked my pedal supply. I found a pair of almost unused Record pedals of the right version for this build. Side strap loop and metal dust cap. Bearings perfect. But they have French threading.




Not a big problem as I also found this pair of SL pedals with shot cages - but with perfect bearings. As the only difference is the axle the conversion will be easy.




This is fun! Looking forward to tomorrow already.

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Old 07-22-18, 05:08 PM
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Originally Posted by styggno1 View Post
I agree - blueprinting, modifying or just tweaking things, a engine or any mehanical part, is very satisfying and it can make a big difference.

This area of the classic Record drive side crank is known to fail. The sharp edges acts as a stress riser (this is difficult in English - not my native language), and the area is also challenging in the forging process, and as pedal power is applied cracks can develop. I have cranks that has been put thru elite and powerful cycling and nothing has happened and I have cranks that I have bought new and used myself that has failed. It is a area that has to be checked regularly.



Here I have started to smooth the sharp edge (green arrow).



Apart from stress relieving the drive side crank I also measured the spider, the five arms, for any wobble. I had to correct two of them a little to get the rings to go perfectly straight. This is a practise I have done for many years and I would not recommend doing it if not absolutely sure about what to do and how to do it. Got to have a "feeling" for the material and what force to apply. Not for the faint of heart.

Today I also checked my pedal supply. I found a pair of almost unused Record pedals of the right version for this build. Side strap loop and metal dust cap. Bearings perfect. But they have French threading.




Not a big problem as I also found this pair of SL pedals with shot cages - but with perfect bearings. As the only difference is the axle the conversion will be easy.




This is fun! Looking forward to tomorrow already.
Agreed, and your English is fine. I don't think this is rocket science especially if you look at how poorly machined and finished some of these are, always room for improvement/mitigation. Even a basic understanding of such things should make it obvious that it could go bad. Nice job on the whole thing, glad you are "forging ahead".

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Old 07-22-18, 10:59 PM
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Originally Posted by John E View Post
What is it with early Campag. front derailleurs? I have had two of the old pushrod Gran Sports with excessive slop caused by wear in the bore of the body, and now you guys are educating me about the flimsiness of some of the early swing-arm Records.
Just spend the serious dollars for the early version with the retaining screws or the later one with the cir-clip.
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Old 07-23-18, 04:47 PM
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Old 07-23-18, 10:18 PM
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Fantastic bike. Fantastic thread about your thought process and approach. Thank you for sharing!

I hope someday I have that kind of time to dedicate to a beautiful project.
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Old 07-24-18, 04:46 PM
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Thanks!

Today there was some action in the hobby shop. Part 1 (lot of pictures).

NOS jockey wheels, upper and lower pivot bolts and internal chain tension spring.



Brute charm!




Front derailleur



Someone enthusiastic has used a drill and file on this one.



Shifters



And now for some real amature drilling! These are not pretty - but they are genuine early 70ies garage style drillium. Normal (nowadays often called long) reach Record brakes.


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Old 07-24-18, 04:57 PM
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Part 2.

Record pedals - now with Italian threaded axles, Christophe Special toe clips and Alfredo Binda straps (with metal roller).



Having trouble chosing bottle cage - TA is the natural choice but the other one (REG) would fit the drillium theme well. It will be a last minute call...



After some cleaning and polishing of the TA.



The REG in all its glory. I have never used one of these where you fasten and release the bottle with a springed lever.




This was a good day.

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Old 07-24-18, 05:24 PM
  #25  
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Excellent as always. Interesting reading through the thought and work processes, looking forward to watching this come together.
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