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Help with rebuilding a Vintage Schwinn Tempo

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Help with rebuilding a Vintage Schwinn Tempo

Old 09-28-17, 03:41 AM
  #1  
stoheaven
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Help with rebuilding a Vintage Schwinn Tempo

Hey guys, so I bought a 1986 Schwinn Tempo Tenxas 6-SPeed and I want to replace everything, derailleur, brakes, cassette, chain - everything. I was looking at a couple parts on Amazon.com and I'm a new rider, so I have no idea what fits what, like a Cassette 28T or 32T, will it fit the 6 speed derailleur?

I know it's a bit much to ask and I have a lot to learn but - would anyone be kind enough to put together a list of compatible parts together for me to bring to my local shop to have them to replace? Thanks guys.
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Old 09-28-17, 04:20 AM
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Why do you want to replace everything? That can get really expensive fast.

What is it that you don't like about your bike that would like to change? It sounds as if you mainly want lower climbing gears. That's easy to do and need not be expensive.

A few pictures of the bike showing the drive side would be useful as well as a better idea of what it is you want to change.
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Old 09-28-17, 04:32 AM
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Where do you live? a 28 or 32T low gear is pretty low. I'll echo bikemig why do you want to change everything?

Personally if you live in a real hilly area I would consider replacing the 42 tooth chainring with a 39 tooth one and maybe going to a 24 or 26 tooth gear in the back. I think that way all you have to change is the 42 tooth chainring.
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Old 09-28-17, 06:44 AM
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Step 1: Do you even know if the bike has a cassette? Until you understand each part, replacement is not appropriate. My guess is it has a freewheel, but I don't have the bike. Totally different technology, not interchangeable.


Buying parts via Amazon is a guaranteed, super expensive approach. You could drop $500 into that bike. And unless you know exactly what you want, you will probably make some mistakes along the way which means attempting to return parts for credit, trying again. Find another bike that already has the parts you want and then ride it.

What you describe is a major undertaking unless you have done several bike rebuilds already. If you have the time/tools/aptitude/working space/pile of parts, then it can be a fun project that to control costs starts with finding a donor bike.


If you are looking for easier gearing, either changing to a compact crankset, or swapping freewheels with a larger cog, along with new chain and possibly changing rear derailleur to handle it. The freewheel change is your cheapest option, if you are resourceful.

Last edited by wrk101; 09-28-17 at 06:51 AM.
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Old 09-28-17, 10:40 AM
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Originally Posted by stoheaven View Post
Hey guys, so I bought a 1986 Schwinn Tempo Tenxas 6-SPeed and I want to replace everything, derailleur, brakes, cassette, chain - everything. I was looking at a couple parts on Amazon.com and I'm a new rider, so I have no idea what fits what, like a Cassette 28T or 32T, will it fit the 6 speed derailleur?

I know it's a bit much to ask and I have a lot to learn but - would anyone be kind enough to put together a list of compatible parts together for me to bring to my local shop to have them to replace? Thanks guys.
Without seeing your bike, it can be difficult to make recommendations.

There could be a chance that the bike may just need an overhaul. There are items that are called "consumables" that most likely should be replaced:
  • cables
  • housing
  • tires
  • tubes
  • rim tape to replace old rim strips - trust me on this.
  • bar tape
  • freewheel
  • chain

Your bike shop mechanic can help you make decisions if any other parts need replacement.

Last bit of advice which could be the most important. Before taking on this project, make sure that the frame fits you. It does not make any sense to have a bike built for you if the frame does not fit.

Have fun with the project.

Dennis
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Old 09-28-17, 10:55 AM
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You can probably put a Shimano 11 speed and 2x crank on it with no problems. Of course other components will have to be changed out too to allow for the 11 speeds.

The must have parts will run you around of 500 bucks if you search carefully online. There might be other things that will catch you, that can cost.

Can you do it yourself? Otherwise labor and other shop cost might get you way more than a new bike. Bike shops are unlikely to let you order the parts yourself if you want them to install the parts. Most can't get any better deal on them than you on those parts and cutting them out of profit on them makes it not worth their time having to deal with things you ordered that may not be quite right.

I just put a new Shimano 11 speed group on a 1991 Paramount.

Last edited by Iride01; 09-28-17 at 12:29 PM.
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Old 09-28-17, 12:02 PM
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I had an ’87 Tempo I sold and it had a threaded freewheel, not a cassette. Nice bike with 105 SIS on the rear & downtube shifters. I still have an ’88 Traveler I built into a SS pathracer. Threaded freewheel - not a cassette. FWIW: I recently rebuilt an ’88 Specialized Sirrus (cro-mo & drops) which had a Uniglide rear cassette (held on with the smallest cog). I don’t think modern hyperglide cassettes were available until just after or around that time.

Bikes of this era have single-pivot side pull brakes. You can try other pads but they still leave me wanting more stopping power. Modern Tektro dual-pivots stop much better, are an easy and inexpensive upgrade. They don't look out of place either.
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Old 09-28-17, 01:38 PM
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I think, anything over 9 speeds will require you to cold set the rear triangle to 135mm spacing.
The bike most likely came from the factory at 126mm rear spacing....
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Old 09-28-17, 01:40 PM
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Hey guys, thanks for all the replies! It seems I have a lot more to learn than originally expected. I just wanted to change out everything since I was planning to strip it down to get the frame repainted and was thinking I may as well replace all the parts while I have it disassembled --- I suppose the best choice is to bring it to my local bike shop and see what they suggest for it. Thanks again everyone! Still got some learning to do.
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Old 09-28-17, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by stoheaven View Post
Hey guys, thanks for all the replies! It seems I have a lot more to learn than originally expected. I just wanted to change out everything since I was planning to strip it down to get the frame repainted and was thinking I may as well replace all the parts while I have it disassembled --- I suppose the best choice is to bring it to my local bike shop and see what they suggest for it. Thanks again everyone! Still got some learning to do.
Yeah, it came with good parts originally. Pretty nice bike. No need to go beyond basic tuneup parts unless there's damaged/broken stuff or you have a specific goal in mind. (i.e. "I want a 2x11 STI drivetrain and I don't care what it costs" or "I need shorter gearing to get up all these #%@*& hills around here.")

Also, is the paint really beat up? Those Tempos had a very cool two-tone thing going on back then; be a shame to just wipe it out with a generic spray job or powder coat.
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Old 09-28-17, 02:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Chombi1 View Post
I think, anything over 9 speeds will require you to cold set the rear triangle to 135mm spacing.
The bike most likely came from the factory at 126mm rear spacing....
This is not correct. Road wheels up to 11 speed are still 130mm. You can easily fit this wheel into 126mm spacing without cold setting.
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Old 09-28-17, 03:28 PM
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Originally Posted by stoheaven View Post
Hey guys, thanks for all the replies! It seems I have a lot more to learn than originally expected. I just wanted to change out everything since I was planning to strip it down to get the frame repainted and was thinking I may as well replace all the parts while I have it disassembled --- I suppose the best choice is to bring it to my local bike shop and see what they suggest for it. Thanks again everyone! Still got some learning to do.
I strongly suggest simply getting the bike tuned up and ride it. Make sure you like it. How you feel on it and how it handles.

Once you have done that then start changing things to suit your riding style.

Spending a ton of money on a bike you've never ridden is not a good idea.
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Old 09-28-17, 04:08 PM
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I too think you should fix up what you have and ride it. Once you've ridden it and become accustomed to it you'll also know what you dislike and that will dictate what you need to replace.

Having owned a few of these I almost always left them as is. Once I put some riser flat bars on one with the cheapest Shimano trigger shifters working a 7 speed freewheel. It was a lovely commuter.
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Old 09-28-17, 04:15 PM
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The '86 Tempo came with SunTour Cyclone derailleurs! WHY would you want to replace those?! OK, the rear will only handle a 7 speed freewheel but still...... SunTour Cyclone is classic stuff and it works so nicely.......

Here's my '86, I replaced the wheels because they didn't match and the crankset because I liked this one better but other than that I basically left it the Hell alone except for normal maintenance items and I LOVE this bike!!!

BEFORE:



AFTER:



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Old 09-28-17, 04:31 PM
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Very nice, Murray M! The black wall tires made a big difference.
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Old 09-29-17, 08:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Aubergine View Post
Very nice, Murray M! The black wall tires made a big difference.
Thanks. A 25 inch would fit me better but I got such a good buy on it and it rode so nice even with the crappy tires I decided to make it work and BOY does it. I recently acquired an '87 Super Sport frame from fellow BF member "rotten" to build and have an '84 Tempo almost done. I used to be kind of "anti-Schwinn" but this bike made a believer out of me.
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Old 09-29-17, 10:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Bianchigirll View Post
I strongly suggest simply getting the bike tuned up and ride it. Make sure you like it. How you feel on it and how it handles.

Once you have done that then start changing things to suit your riding style.

Spending a ton of money on a bike you've never ridden is not a good idea.
I agree completely. Stripping down a bike, getting it painted, and replacing all the parts is a very expensive endeavour. You could easily sink a $1k in the bike before you knew it. Ride it as is, and make adjustments as needed..
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Old 09-29-17, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by stoheaven View Post
would anyone be kind enough to put together a list of compatible parts together for me to bring to my local shop to have them to replace? Thanks guys.
The most cost effective way is to take your bike into the local shop and point to it and say "I want to replace this". If your paying someone else to replace everything you will save $ buying something new.
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Old 09-29-17, 06:11 PM
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@stoheaven: I'm also going to take a moment to point out that the Tempo is a pretty sweet bike totally stock (owned an '84 for a while) and you'd do well to just clean everything up and ride it as-is before you get all crazy. I expect you'll be pleasantly surprised.

You know, unless everything is totally thrashed. Need pics!
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Old 09-29-17, 08:52 PM
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If you need some motivation, go to the 1980s Schwinn thread.

Show off your late 1980's Schwinn road bike here

I got some motivation from it when I was doing my resto-mod 1985 Tempo. Mine is on page 27, post #660.

Dennis
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Old 10-28-17, 04:50 PM
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1984 Schwinn Tempo 21Inch

bought new in 1984 for $400. 33 years late, thousands of miles and many upgrades. only original components are frame, seat post and fork.
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