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What basic tools would you say everyone needs to start working on C&V bicycles?

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What basic tools would you say everyone needs to start working on C&V bicycles?

Old 11-06-17, 01:59 PM
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polymorphself 
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What basic tools would you say everyone needs to start working on C&V bicycles?

I've been bit by the bug and and preparing to tear down a recent find, clean it, wax and add some replacement bits.

HOWEVER, I don't have the tools to do so. I'm working on putting together a small starter kit. First up is a workstand (I believe I'm going to go with a Park Tool PCS-10). What about tools though? Can you recommend a starter set for for basic maintenance? Anything else?

Thanks!
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Old 11-06-17, 02:04 PM
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You just need regular hand tools for most of the work (metric wrenches, allen keys, regular and phillips screw drivers, crescent wrench, hammer, etc.). For bike specific tools, you'll need cone wrenches, a cable cutter, a pedal wrench, and headset wrenches. Thin wrenches are also very useful.

Park makes good quality bike tools but there are other companies that do as well.

Since you're starting out from scratch, you could consider buying a tool kit like this one from Nashbar,

https://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...0052_551678_-1

There are also Park tool kits. Nashbar carries them as well and they come in various prices

You may not need all the tools in the Park AK 2 tool kit but the list will give you a good idea of the kinds of tools you may need:

https://www.parktool.com/product/adv...tabbed-section

Last edited by bikemig; 11-06-17 at 02:09 PM.
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Old 11-06-17, 02:26 PM
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OP, I'm starting down the same overhaul rabbit hole myself. Funny, I'm looking at bike stands too...
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Old 11-06-17, 02:27 PM
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I started out with one of those cheap china kits for 50 bucks, it was great to get started and i still have most of the pieces. The bottom bracket tool, headset wrench, chain whip, hex keys and cone wrenches were good for basic stuff. over time i've added piece by piece by need. The triangle park tool allen wrench is a must have, same with the nut driver. Having a crescent wrench from size 7mm to 17mm is a must. and invest in a legit cable cutter. Buy as you need is my method for tools.
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Old 11-06-17, 02:33 PM
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Add crank arm removal tool to the list of bike specific tools you really need.
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Old 11-06-17, 02:35 PM
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Cone wrenches
44/5/6 mm Allen Wrenches
crank bolt wrench
Crank puller
BB wrenches Fixed-cup pin spanner and lock-ring wrench
headset wrenches
pedal and dust-cap wrench
seatpost wrench (if campy 2-bolt style)
Brake cable cutter
socket or open end wrenches
pliers
24 oz Ball Peen hammer (for when you get mad)
Tire irons
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Old 11-06-17, 02:36 PM
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and if your going to be removing and installing Freewheels you will also need the Park sockets to work with those. The specific models depend on which manufacturers freewheels your going to be working with. Also, spoke wrenches to tru-up those wheels (I like the Park SW-20 series as they grab spoke nipples on all four corners.

I started off with one of the $50 Nashbar tool kits (four years ago) and have added over the past few years. If you have a decent LBS around you they normally have the Park Tools for when you find you'll need something else, fast. I've gotten to the the point now that I have a truing stand, derailleur hanger and dropout alignment tools, homemade frame and wheel alignment jigs all within in the last year. Albeit, I'm still using a homemade workstand so you'll be ahead of me in that category.

W A R N I N G : Tearing down and rebuilding, updating and restoring these fine old machines is additive. BUT OH SO MUCH FUN !

Last edited by Don Buska; 11-06-17 at 05:57 PM.
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Old 11-06-17, 02:38 PM
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Pedro’s makes great tools, comparable to Park. Either of their cone wrenches in single sizes are much better then those double-ended ones. I’d also suggest getting a set of good quality set of metric Allen wrenches that have a ball-end on the long end. Those can be invaluable for some fasteners.

A danger of those cheap kits is that you will delay buying the good quality tools, putting you or your bike at risk. And try, try, try to avoid using a crescent wrench. But there are situations that it’s needed.
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Old 11-06-17, 02:49 PM
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Digital caliper and a decent bench vise would help. If you go to estate sales, you can acquire some good tools for not a lot of $.
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Old 11-06-17, 02:54 PM
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Patience, common sense and some photografs before disassembling.
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Old 11-06-17, 02:55 PM
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Originally Posted by MarcoBianchi View Post
Patience, common sense and some photografs before disassembling.
In addition to the above.
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Old 11-06-17, 02:56 PM
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A tube of Mobil 1 synthetic grease.
And bearings. Lots of bearings.
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Old 11-06-17, 03:04 PM
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That was smart deciding to get a good workstand before anything else!
Unlike me who waited till I had 9 bikes and a lot of pain and aches, building and servicing them through the years!....
I can blame it all on my C&V cheapskate attitude,.....I guess?.....
Now, with my newly acquired Park PRS-5 workstand, I can't wait to dive right into my next (Bottechia) resto project!
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Old 11-06-17, 03:12 PM
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PB blaster.
And a cheater bar.
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Old 11-06-17, 03:17 PM
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I sold all my tools after a 2001 car wreck busted up my back and neck so I had to replace everything when I resumed cycling in 2015.

I started with a Venzo tool kit, which seemed comparable to most tool kits available and better than some for the money. No complaints after more than a year and several maintenance chores. Everything works fine. No bent or deformed tools. The Venzo tools seem comparable to Park's.

The spoke nipple wrench is an odd design -- shaped like a bottle cap (near lower left, inside the wrench, in the linked illustration), but it works. The chain breaker is much better than my old chain tool, especially for finessing the tension after removing a link. The plastic tire levers felt a bit thin but have worked fine on several flat repairs and tire changes, including with a really stubborn pair of Schwalbe road bike folders.

I've added a few other tools that weren't in the kit:
  • Jagwire cable/housing cutters. Works great, no problems.
  • A couple of Park freewheel tools for Suntour and SunRace (and other) freewheels.
  • Park CCW-5 crank wrench.
  • A foot long 1" combination wrench, plenty of leverage for removing my freewheels. (I weigh 160 lbs. A heavier rider who stands on the pedals to climb might need more leverage to swap freewheels, especially on older bikes if the threads weren't greased.)

I carry a Park multitool, whatever their lowest end model is with basic hex wrenches and a couple of screwdrivers. On one occasion I could have used a spoke nipple wrench, after an unexpected sideways skid on loose gravel over freshly redone chipseal warped the rear rim. So far I haven't needed a chain tool on a ride, and I carry a spare KMC Missing Link.
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Old 11-06-17, 03:37 PM
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Big F**king Hammer
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Old 11-06-17, 04:10 PM
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A chain breaking tool.
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Old 11-06-17, 04:13 PM
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I have nothing to add other than to say we ought to sticky this sort of information. Sometimes I need a quick reference as to something I might be missing as well.
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Old 11-06-17, 04:23 PM
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If you ever service a machine with a cottered crank, a cotter press will be really handy. I have one from Bikesmith
https://www.bikesmithdesign.com/CotterPress/
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Old 11-06-17, 05:30 PM
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Thanks for this referral page!
Although I just used 9.5mm uncut cotters successfully, I'm happy to see they offer "Raleigh" cuts!

I [luckily] haven't needed to use a cotter press, it's nice to know that there is one available. I followed RJ's technique with a hammer and 2x4's

Also, the BB fixed cup remover would be the only sane way of removing the fixed cup. Again, I was fortunate to not need to unscrew the cup, and just cleaned and repacked the drive side bearings with the cup in place


Originally Posted by Salubrious View Post
If you ever service a machine with a cottered crank, a cotter press will be really handy. I have one from Bikesmith
https://www.bikesmithdesign.com/CotterPress/
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Old 11-06-17, 05:45 PM
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I would have to add if you have a really nice, original near-perfect bike, I suggest a 1/8w Whitworth (BSE) socket or box wrench for the:

Seatpost pinch
quill stem
handlebar pinch

I just used an adjustable wrench (Crescent), but wouldn't if it were really mint.

seems everything else is metric or flat bladed screwdriver

If you want to tackle Sturmey-Archer 3 speed hubs, you will need two 16mm cone wrenches and a small chissel. A small bench vise is also helpful.

I want to get an ultrasonic cleaner someday too.
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Old 11-06-17, 05:59 PM
  #22  
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I have given the what tools question some thought. This is what I came up with - Vintage Bicycle Tools. The article suggests what tools are needed from simple cleaning to full blown restoration. Hope it is a help.

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Old 11-06-17, 06:38 PM
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probably not a "basic" tool, but certainly a useful tool.. the Third Hand.
As the photo indicates, it holds the brakes pads against the rim, making it easier to adjust the cable length.

I've got a version from Var, and it is really a pleasure to use!




Steve in Peoria
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Old 11-07-17, 05:37 AM
  #24  
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Tools NOT to get - hacksaw, paintbrush.
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Old 11-07-17, 06:23 AM
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Tools NOT to get - hacksaw, paintbrush.
I hate to but have to disagree. Pretty hard to cut out a badly seized seat post or steering stem, without a hacksaw. And a paint brush? I paint some of my bikes with a paint brush, this Peugeot PX10 being an example of the results one can achieve with minimal expense and mess...

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