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Wheelset fitting

Old 12-05-17, 10:54 PM
  #1  
earlethomas
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Wheelset fitting

If my wheelset is spec'd at 130mm dropout spread and the mixte (3 stays) I want to fit it to measures 135mm, do I have any options?

Conversely, if I need to spread a 126mm rear to fit the 130mm hub, can this be done and how? I understand these operations are complicated by the added stay for a meext. Any thoughts appreciated.

thomas

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Old 12-06-17, 07:43 AM
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Thomas, IME spreading a 126 mm frame to fit a 130 mm OLD hub causes no problems. Of course the stays need to be defect free prior to the swap. I have read positive comments regarding a 130 mm hub used in a 135 mm frame, but I have no personal experience.
The mixte frame maybe more difficult due to tension from the third stay.
I think a good alternative is to swap axles to one 135 mm compatible, add spacers and redish the wheel.

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Old 12-06-17, 07:48 AM
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put a longer axle in, add 5mm more spacer to the left end , re true the wheel to be centered over that wider axle..

you will be adding tension to the NDS, taking some off the DS, so a bit more balanced than the 130..


Cold sets are done with leverage .. a 10 foot long 2 by 4, will offer that...






....
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Old 12-06-17, 01:37 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Cold sets are done with leverage .. a 10 foot long 2 by 4, will offer that...


That takes care of the leverage part, but you also have to take care of the "making sure the dropouts end up the same distance from the centerline" part and the "realigning the dropouts" part. It can be done successfully at home, plenty of folks here have done it, and I probably could, too, given enough time and patience, but I think it's much safer to let an experienced pro do it. My $.02.
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Old 12-06-17, 02:44 PM
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What bikingshearer said. These DIY cold sets done without realigning the dropout faces result in nonparallel dropouts. For a while, these appear to work just fine, but then either your axle breaks or you crack a dropout due to the bending stress at the junction between the nonperpendicular axle and dropout.

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Old 12-06-17, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
put a longer axle in, add 5mm more spacer to the left end , re true the wheel to be centered over that wider axle..

you will be adding tension to the NDS, taking some off the DS, so a bit more balanced than the 130..

Cold sets are done with leverage .. a 10 foot long 2 by 4, will offer that.

....
Axle change would be the best thing to do. If it has a solid axle, it might be long enough already to just add spacers and redish.
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Old 12-08-17, 12:25 AM
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Some very interesting responses, thanks to all. What's a redish? Think I know but can you point to some education on this? How to...

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Old 12-08-17, 05:43 AM
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Originally Posted by earlethomas View Post
Some very interesting responses, thanks to all. What's a redish? Think I know but can you point to some education on this? How to...
Shortening the drive-side spokes, lengthening the non-drive-side spokes, with caveats of course. The same caveats that apply to any wheel truing.

It's like truing a wheel but moving all spokes in the same direction. It doesn't take much, half a turn of the spoke nipples, one turn, whatever. I like to operate in quarter-turns but it takes longer. If the wheel is strung loose you may not have to loosen the left side. Work your way around the rim starting at the known spot like the valve stem, counting as you go so you don't lose your place. Be careful about the spokes being torqued from friction between the spoke and the nipple. Some may be stuck or sticky. You can check the dish in the frame pretty well by sighting the tire against the brake mounting bolt. If possible flip the wheel over (harder on a rear wheel) to see if it shifts laterally, indicating you aren't done. Of course you don't want to end up with any spoke having significantly more or less tension than the other. Of course you want to end up with as little lateral out-of-trueness as you can manage. There are other subtleties to truing but patience is the most important thing.
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Old 12-08-17, 05:53 AM
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Originally Posted by jimmuller View Post
Shortening the drive-side spokes, lengthening the non-drive-side spokes, with caveats of course. The same caveats that apply to any wheel truing.

It's like truing a wheel but moving all spokes in the same direction. It doesn't take much, half a turn of the spoke nipples, one turn, whatever. I like to operate in quarter-turns but it takes longer. If the wheel is strung loose you may not have to loosen the left side. Work your way around the rim starting at the known spot like the valve stem, counting as you go so you don't lose your place. Be careful about the spokes being torqued from friction between the spoke and the nipple. Some may be stuck or sticky. You can check the dish in the frame pretty well by sighting the tire against the brake mounting bolt. If possible flip the wheel over (harder on a rear wheel) to see if it shifts laterally, indicating you aren't done. Of course you don't want to end up with any spoke having significantly more or less tension than the other. Of course you want to end up with as little lateral out-of-trueness as you can manage. There are other subtleties to truing but patience is the most important thing.
Yes, the basic goal is to make sure the center plane of the tire is in the center plane of the frame and parallell to the center plane of the frame, after the frame has been made wider.
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Old 12-09-17, 04:38 AM
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Originally Posted by davester View Post
These DIY cold sets done without realigning the dropout faces result in nonparallel dropouts. For a while, these appear to work just fine, but then either your axle breaks or you crack a dropout due to the bending stress at the junction between the nonperpendicular axle and dropout.

Guess how I know this.



The attached drawing shows how much the dropouts can be out of alignment from stretching a rear triangle from 120mm to 126mm without realigning the dropouts. More so if the rear triangle was out of alignment from the factory.

Another symptom of misaligned dropouts is the cones and cups are unevenly worn either towards the front or rear.

Chas.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
DropOutAngles.jpg (154.6 KB, 49 views)
File Type: jpg
WornCone.jpg (26.7 KB, 49 views)
File Type: jpg
new 075.jpg (148.8 KB, 49 views)
File Type: jpg
new 069.jpg (174.4 KB, 49 views)
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Old 12-09-17, 01:02 PM
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But realigning the dropouts (and fork ends) can be done with no special tools, and it's easier and faster than fixing a flat. I've done it a few times and it takes 30-60 seconds. Literally.
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