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Why those particular bikes?

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Why those particular bikes?

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Old 01-04-18, 04:13 PM
  #26  
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1. fit
2. geometry
3. quality tubing
4. interesting backstory
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Old 01-04-18, 04:41 PM
  #27  
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So many have come and gone.... but OK, the current crop. It's about people.

1984 Klein Performance from nesteel here on BF. Most challenging build I have ever done, and the only tourer I've built for myself. There were obstacles and limitations every step, every component. I'll have to post a "completed" pic when the final chain ring comes in.

1985 Raleigh Competition Racing USA. I was fortunate enough in my life to make the acquaintance and then the friendship of Coleman Howard, aka. cehowardGS. He collected and liked those bikes, the Racing USA line-up with the chrome stays, in Reynolds 551. I bought this because he thought I should. He'll never care how I build it, and think every version is cool. I'm a better person for having met him, and he makes me smile a lot and shed tears on occasion.

1989 Centurion Ironman Expert. Almost everyone here knows of my predilection for this marque. It was black, came from a BF member, and I built it. I only wish I could remember who sold it to me. There have been so many. I am an everyman, and this is everyman's bike. It's one in a long string of them, almost all from BF members. It keeps me in the cult, grounds me, because it's rusting a bit and I don't care. It has a straight block on it and that used to be fun, then humbling, and now humiliating. So be it.

1988 Centurion Ironman Master. Same addiction, one of several I've purchased from oddjob here on BF. For that reason alone, I dig it. It's also my favorite scheme, the Purple Haze, and I'm running full-on DA 7700 with polished Rolf Vector Pro's. It's hot now, would have been very hot back then, and has been up and down Thunder Ridge with both Campy and Shimano, and over the hills and through the woods of the Dairyland Dare, again with both Campy and Shimano. The fit is just right, and I feel good on it. I can forget things on it. For that reason alone, I ride it. Dave Scott would like it; I have no doubt.

1989 Centurion Carbon R. This is an Asian market update to the Ironman Carbon, which suffered a bit from flex and a pasta fork. The improvements, at least for the 56cm model, were great. It was also from a BF member, Quoung Vuang, and he is a master builder, in my view, in Australia. I paid good money for it, and don't care a whit. The care and time he put into the frame alone were worth it. I hung DA 9000 on it and 2017 Bontrager RXL wheels. Total cost was $1700, less the tricolor group, saddle, and some other stuff, so figure $1350. I've not ridden a better bike for the money, and maybe only 1 or 2 bikes that I liked as much, period. Someday, the carbon will asplode, I'm sure. If I have to pull pieces of carbon fiber out of some tender spot someday, I'll try real hard to laugh and say it was worth it.

2001 Cannondale R800, from Flog00. My respect for Doc Cannondale and qcpmsame kind of led me to this, along with Old'sCool and lest we not forget, mntbiker. It was not a challenge to build, but it was kind of fun, and I built it at my office at nights and on weekends when I really needed the solitude. Not sure when I'll ride it, but it's "tight and right."

That being said, all but the black Ironman are geared for climbing, so anyone that wants to, say, partake of the thrills of Thunder Ridge in May or the Dairyland Dare in August, I've got a huckleberry you can use.
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Old 01-04-18, 04:43 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by Reco Very View Post
Wow... this thread made me realize I have NEVER bought myself a bike. So why are there so many around me?
My current fav is a Miyata 310 that I found on clearance at a Pawn1 store. A family member paid $25 and said Merry Christmas early. All the rest have been given to me.
I am SO OPEN to adoption.
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Old 01-04-18, 04:46 PM
  #29  
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I like Italian bikes...so almost every bike I own was made there.
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Old 01-04-18, 05:03 PM
  #30  
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There's no rhyme or reason to my motley "collection" of cycles.
I like what I like, and have a penchant for early Treks.
None of mine are especially pretty, most are "7 footers". And I don't care. Not having to worry about scratching something brings a certain amount of joy.
They do however, work very well. No tolerance for crap that doesn't function as it should.
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Old 01-04-18, 05:21 PM
  #31  
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It's been an evolutionary process. Hoping this doesn't become a book, but the title of it could be Sentimentality - Existing and Self-generated.

I rode bikes in my younger years. Faster was better. I got away from it for a bit over 20 years and my re-entry was a much less than satisfying Magna with a suspension. I hated riding it. Between the loss of all those years of fitness and disparity between that evil, two-wheeled contraption and what I was used to caused me to nearly give up. Online research led me to Sheldon Brown's site. A couple opportunistic curb finds netted me a low-end Follis that was too large for me, and a Raleigh Grand Prix. I then sought the best bike I'd had - a gold, 1978 Raleigh Super Course. I learned that it was not the be-all end-all, and set out to get something better. I got my Fuji Finest after a failed e-Bay auction. The Raleigh Professional came to me as a thoroughly repainted disaster, complete with stuck seat post when I won an e-Bay auction for $32 and change.

In the years since, nearly equal parts thrift, opportunism, trial and error, and desire have given me a garage with arguably a few too many bicycles that originated in England, the Fuji, a Miyata and a converted Giant Iguana. Most of the niches that I came to recognize and feel some connection to have been filled. Fixed gear, path racer, club machine, sport tourers, racing machines - largely from my formative years of the 1970's are there. As my uncle was a Raleigh dealer back in those years, I naturally gravitated to that marque. Yes, I do still have an itch for a Frejus like one I saw in his shop about 1975, and I love the concept of purpose-made constructeurs (whether older or modern), but aside from those perceived voids, I don't have further wishes.

I had a couple Treks... nicely made and finished, but the ride didn't do it for me. Tried a Surly LHT... but the sum of the parts was pushing 40 pounds (I still dread hills). Had a Hetchin's Magnum Opus... I did like how it rode, but I felt horribly pretentious riding it. I'd have to say that I'm unlikely to have my interests evolve in any further significant way, and do still intend to make the hobbies of my 60's and beyond be riding and working with wood.

While I enjoy the exercise of putting neglected bicycles back on the road, I think I am nearing the point where I want to cut back the volume on big projects. I have one more (with a major assist from gugie) "big" project that I'm about to bite off, but from here on, I'm not intending to purchase anything more to work on unless my wife prevails upon me.
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Old 01-04-18, 05:27 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by jimmuller View Post
Probly shifts like buttah too, dozennit?

No, butter has too much friction. My ARSD unit (Automated Ratio Selection Device) shifts like heated Vaseline that has been lubed with graphite and Teflon infused KY jelly.

I know the kids are all running the electronic Di2 shifting nowadays. But that is sooo clunky. That's 2017 yesteryear hardware. You still have to push the buttons, like in an F1 car, too primitive. I simply can't be bothered at the speeds that I run. Inside my bottom bracket is a 17 speed dual clutch fully automatic micro-transmission. It's coupled to a microcomputer hidden in the down tube that reads a gyroscope for terrain, a power meter that reads watts, a speedometer, and a tach that reads RPM. The shift mechanism is pneumatically operated and charged with helium at 1,371 psi. The whole thing weighs 17.325 grams. I run thinner and undersized inner tubes to make up for weight. I can't feel the actual shifts themselves, but I can sense the different ratios.
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Old 01-04-18, 06:08 PM
  #33  
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Hmmm,..... This maybe tough.

Giordana Antares - My first Italian, I take it out wearing hot pink gear and it makes me work hard passing everyone I encounter because if you're riding a pink bike and wearing pink, you better be fast.
Giordana XL Super - I found this NOS after falling in love with how the Antares feels. This one is so much better, magical!
Schwinn Paramount Series PDG - Got it for the Red, White and Blue paint scheme. Then found out it fast and a good climber despite the gearing. Also a prototype of the PDG bikes.
Schwinn Prologue - Local ad, dirt cheap, Dura Ace 7400, fast on the road and a 1987.
Schwinn Circuit - Another 1987, was actually searching for another 1999 Circuit when I found this. Built with Athena 11 speed and for some reason my fastest sprinting bike.
Schwinn Paramount- Also a 1987 (there's a theme there), got it to see what the hype was about. Found out it's serial #1 for the year. Repainted and upgraded. It's Yellow and black so I consider it my Steelers bike.
Schwinn Prologue TT - Found locally really cheap and got it since everyone should own at least one vintage "funny bike" in their life
Schwinn Tempo - Frame only right now, got it to round out my collection of 1987 Schwinns
Opus III - Showed up locally one Saturday morning, loved the look. Got the owner to hold it and drove 4 hours round trip to get it. I think it's my most classic looking bike.
Peugeot -U0-8 - Local and cheap and in really good condition. Got it because the are cheap, plain bikes that ride much nicer than they should.
Bob Jackson - Also local, loved the black look and wanted to try a one. It's a great comfortable ride and I've never seen another one in real life.
Bridgestone Mile 112 - I got it purely to try the first version of Suntours Accushift. Has been really fast they day's I've had it out. May not be a keeper though.
Bianchi Campione - Loved the bright green color, and was literally mint when I picked it up. Locally owner bought it and never used it. Also one I may not keep
Orbea Cabestany - Fairly rough with a crazy mix of parts. Got it because it was local, cheap and different. Amazingly good ride and now my winter/bad roads bikes.
Centurion Ironman Expert - 1989 Smoke over water- Bought because I've always wanted to try an Ironman and because I've always wanted a bike with the smoke/marbled paint look.
Centurion Ironman Expert - 1987 - Found locally while antiquating. Price was good and the other Ironman wasn't built up yet. Bought this one to experience the Ironman ride and knowing if I needed to I could sell it and lose nothing. Good stock components.
Fuji S12s - Found locally for real cheap, bought solely to convert to 650b for light touring and such.
Lemond Tourmelet - Bought this to replace my Zurich that's on permanent loan to a friend. Was the bike that convinced me to sell my C.F. bikes. The was rebuilt with a mix of Dura Ace and Ultegra parts
Greg Lemond Ventoux - Found locally and wanted to try one of the Italian Billato built Lemonds. Once I sorted it out I fell in love with it despite it being the "lesser" grade Cromor steel
Greg Lemond Maillot Jaune - Another Billato built bike, this one TSX tubed and a classic blue color with Campagnolo Chorus components. Now one of my favorite rides and the holder of the PR for my 25 mile route.
Lemond GLX Team Gan - Got if for the looks, for the fact it's a Lemond, for the fact it's Billato built, and for the fact it's Excell GLX (Podium) tubed. Also for the fact that this was the last team Greg raced for on his final Tour De France. Trying to determine if it's one of the limited 100 set.
Serotta CSi- Lusted after a Serotta for years. A beautiful one showed up locally and while on line researching prices for these I found the one I wound up buying. Loved it for the paint scheme, components and really good price.
Basso Gap - Found locally and always wanted to try a Basso. This one had a really good repaint done, classic bergundy red with yellow trim. Could resist and this one rides smooth as silk.
De Rosa Nuovo Classico - Found locally as a frame. Had to try a De Rosa, had to! Built up now with Chorus 11 speed groupset. Sweet ride
Jake the Snake - Found locally several years ago in mint condition. My only CX bike and equipped with fenders now for rainy rides
AMF Hercules - Bought as a project bike and set up as an around town errand runner/grocery getter/ Need to fix broken crank on it now.

I think that's pretty much it. Another factor for me is that I ride primarily the same route for the 5000 to 8000 miles I ride each year. Having a large selection to enjoy helps keep it all fresh as I get to know and appreciate different aspects of the various bikes. I log all my miles and if a bike isn't used it get's sold.

And I have too much available storage space so there's always room for another bike, LOL!

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Old 01-04-18, 06:23 PM
  #34  
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I currently have 3 personal bikes, all steel, lugged and vintage (there are 6 bikes in the garage, mywife's cruiser bought to try to get her to ride....so far no luck, My son's Haro Bmx, keeping with the idea that their may be grandkids in 10 years or so, My son's Soma Fixie...in my garage because the school he goes to Humboldt State is know as HSU, hills, stairs, umbrellas is not fixie/single speed friendly)

as for my bikes here is the story

'82 or so Nishiki. this was a classic 80's japanese bike, suntour derailers, downtube friction, diacompe breaks, sugino crank, 27 " araya rims on "i forget" hubs.

I moved from NYC to California and did not have a car or a lot of bucks for one. So I went to a local shop (the off ramp in santa clara, ca for locals) with my room mate (my best buddy from Montana) in his datsun 210 and we both bought bikes, his 21" and mine 23". Commuted to work on this and brought home groceries and beer on it. Weekends by buddy and i would bike all over the place, wine tasting ,etc we got bike glove tans. I eventually even did a couple of short course triathlons on this bike.......story to continue

89 Miyata 1400 originally Ultegra 600 tricolor, 14 speed indexed, downtube shifters, biopace, wolber rims on ultegra hubs, sella italia turbo saddle (still in use)
Was into triathlons and wanted a better bike. Did a lot looking at the local bike shops (Bridgestone, Specialize, Pansonic were brands I looked at) but Miyata just caught my attention (it was a hot brand then also). This was their "triathlon" bike, i.e on step below a full race bike. I bought the bike and very soon after met my future wife....riding slowed and did not do another triathlon. a few years later, i started riding again, but the hills were steeper so I had a local shop (Shaw's Light weight cycles long gone) make it a triple. It worked and road well, but the mix of rx100 and other parts never felt right and as nice as the original ultegra, but the triple did flatten out the hills. I also commuted on this bike when I had a job about 10 miles each way from home. story to continue

Back to the Nishiki, I wanted to start doing more errands, commuting. i threw a new stem, bar, and brake levers on it to make it upright and used it a bit for that, but it was never really great, so when I decided really remodel it to a simple utility/commuter , I also decided to to all the work, both as a hobby, and as a cost savings. It was through this that i discovered bike forums and really got back into wrenching. My first post was a typical newbie asking if the brooks magic was real. This ended up with the current incarnation of the Nishki, only original parts are frame, fork and seat post. it is now a 700cc, 1x8, thumbshifter, brooks b17, campy centaur crank and bb, nitto dirt drop, nitto promenade, wald basket, sks fender commuter/utility bike. I learned how to paint a frame, cold set a frame, remove and put on new headset, build a wheel, etc with this bike...it really got me back into wrenching.

back to the Miyata 1400. I now have the bug and want to get it back to ultegra level. So with a lot of ebay and other purchases it is now Ultegra 9 speed triple, with a brooks swift. I tried barcons, they weren't for me so I went brifter and am very happy with those.

So for these 2 bikes, the first was choice of necessity, buying decent quality as I could and the second was a choice of desire buying greater quality. both make me smile

my final bike is 84 torpado. Because of what I had learned relearned about wrenching, I started helping with a local bike charity, bringing my son with me. This was a bit of small world because the creator of the charity was a block away neighbor who's dog was the only one that did not scare my son when he was a toddler. I acted as a sounding board for him on a couple of critical decisions.....like should he take advantage or a short term warehouse offer to grow the charity.....(which considering he had maybe 300 bikes in his back yard was not that difficult ). I did at one point tell him if he saw a 58cm or so frame they could not rehab or was too much work to let me know because I was thinking about the next build being a single speed. A week later I came home and the torpado was on my front step.

this was yet another learning experience, between a stuck seat post and a mix of campy, ofmega and universal parts. old asymetrical campy/ofmega bb is a mystical and arcane lore. I got the bike running with help from the forum (Biannchigirll, Randyjawa and holiday76) and is is just a fun ride... it is also my first bike to go tubular.

I really don't need another bike, I have relatively modern road bike, a hop on and ride commuter/utiliyt, and a eroica/heroica ready ride (I can dream)

I used to think about a grail bike like a de rosa, but no really anymore. I would grab a 58cm Torpado superlight in decent shape just because the torpado super strada is a fun ride, i am intrigued by the idea of an higher end version of the frame with modern components.

some day maybe a kirk custom?

but what I have brings smiles when i ride and is part of my history



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Old 01-04-18, 06:26 PM
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My main three weekend riders (1965ish Cinelli, 1978 Eisentraut, 1982ish Ron Cooper) are all nostalgia machines; I lusted after them 40+ years ago when I could not afford them, found them when I could afford them, and snagged 'em. All have 10-speed Campy triples, as I think vintage steel with that set-up is the bee's knees. The 1986 De Rosa I traded away for the 1965ish Cinelli was the same way. With all of these bikes, aside from the great rides and gorgeous looks, I love that the people whose names are on them were intimately involved with their creation

BTW, if I can't take the 1965ish Cinelli to heaven with me, I'm not going.

The 1967 Paramount was also a nostalgia find, and I got it before the four listed above. I set it up with Shimano 9-speed triple. It is now my commuter with an upright bar, and it's perfect for that task.

The Burley tandem was bought 20+ years ago when my son was young. We had some big fun on it. I've also had some big fun on it with a good friend as the stoker, and he has had big fun on it with his then-young son as the stoker. It needs to be recabled but is otherwise still in good (if dusty) shape.

The Trek 520 was bought and used for loaded touring, and it is great for that. I have not done any loaded touring in quite a few years, however, so it sits ratherly forlornly in a dark corner of the basement. It deserves better, even if it is a 1994 TIG-welded non-C&V beast.

Then there are the three frame & fork combos sitting somewhat less forlornly in a somewhat lees dark corner of the basement: a 2000 Lemond Zurich, a 198? or 199? Medici Pro Strada and a 1993 Fuso. The Lemond was bought to replace an RB-1 that was destroyed by a gnarly crack and the Miyata Prolog that I bought to replace the RB-1 but did not like. Then I was bitten by two bugs: the "OMG an old Paramount that fits me" bug and the "I'm not sure I fully trust a carbon fork" bug. It rode great, but was a tad small.

The Fuso (one of the very first post-Dave Moulton retirement ones, built by Russ Denny) is a fun bike, but on longer rides it's a little stiff and buzzy for my tastes (handles great and has great road manners, though).

The Medici has a decent respray (it may be powdercoat - I don't know how to tell and didn't think to ask) with bad repro graphics and is the result of a stupid-low bid bid on eBay that won. I have never built it up so I have no clue how good or bad the ride is.

Then there are the Eroica bikes. The 1961 Bianchi Competizione was literally a barn find c.1973. I used it some in the mid-70s, dragged the F&F around with me for decades (not an exaggeration), and ultimately decided to have it repainted and build it up with more or less period appropriate parts for no particular reason other than giggles. Then along came Eroica California #1, and it actually saw pavement (and strade bianche) again. Other than being a bit small for me, it rides well.

The other Eroica bike is a 1972ish Cinelli. It was a target of opportunity on the 'Bay a few years ago and I grabbed it. It's a little bigger than the Bianchi but still a bit small for me, but it has been my ride for Erocia California #s 2 & 3. I have not decided whether to ride it or the Bianchi this year. I still have 3+ months to make up my mind.
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Old 01-04-18, 06:34 PM
  #36  
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Two McLeans

One built, one a basketcase.

Always wanted one of these and now I ended up with two.

I would have to say the rest are a bit interchangeable.

All fun though.

IMG copy by gomango1849, on Flickr

Few changes since the pic, but you get the idea.

Untitled by gomango1849, on Flickr

Untitled by gomango1849, on Flickr

Love the color.

IMG_0433 by gomango1849, on Flickr
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Old 01-04-18, 06:41 PM
  #37  
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1. Riding bikes is fun
2. Riding bikes is fun
3. I like things that are different, I don't see much point in having 2 of the same thing
4. I like the good stuff, I'm too old to deal with crap

So currently I am down to a 1925 Frejus Corsa, 1933 Frejus Corsa w/Vittoria Margherita, 1959 Cinelli Mod B w/Gran Sport, 2009 Cinelli XCR w/SR and a 2009 aluminum fixed gear. Yes, that last one is a cheap piece of crap, but being a fixed gear, it isn't a bother. And I have a 5-year plan to replace it with a full custom rig.
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Old 01-04-18, 06:43 PM
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Originally Posted by gomango View Post
Untitled by gomango1849, on Flickr

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I will never get tired of seeing this bike. The epitome of understated elegance.
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Old 01-04-18, 06:43 PM
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Two I have owned for over 40 years, purchased new.

There is a trend, four brands are multiple in number, minimum of three each, they all show an age range. Documenting the subtle development of the brand is satisfying, and satisfies a curiosity.
A few were purchased to fit family members. Some may be ready to sell off, they have grown.
(My son may not match my height... so there will be a few more to buy at some point.)
One was a bike I admired locally when I was young, but avoided as not to copy the guy on the next block.
A very few were just good deals that fit and at the price appealed enough to open the wallet.
One was to most a grail, opportunity does not often knock twice.
The grand total now... 50ish. Things are piling up.

Trouble is of the five I have sold off, I regret selling three. One was just necessary to raise capital to go back to school. Another would be fun to ride again. Another is a grail level, sold at a modest profit 38 years ago, but a bit big.
The other two, one was too big, I have a sistership now, the last sale... be fun to have, but no real regret.

Bikes I did not buy? Four, and fortunate in a way, saved me a lot of money, but I wish I bought two of them.
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Old 01-04-18, 06:48 PM
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Originally Posted by iab View Post
1. Riding bikes is fun
2. Riding bikes is fun
3. I like things that are different, I don't see much point in having 2 of the same thing
4. I like the good stuff, I'm too old to deal with crap

So currently I am down to a 1925 Frejus Corsa, 1933 Frejus Corsa w/Vittoria Margherita, 1959 Cinelli Mod B w/Gran Sport, 2009 Cinelli XCR w/SR and a 2009 aluminum fixed gear. Yes, that last one is a cheap piece of crap, but being a fixed gear, it isn't a bother. And I have a 5-year plan to replace it with a full custom rig.
I'm just waiting for the bike you designed and computer modeled.
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Old 01-04-18, 06:50 PM
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Originally Posted by bikingshearer View Post
I will never get tired of seeing this bike. The epitome of understated elegance.

Thanks.

Crazy times. Almost sold it last summer as we have two young men in college atm.

$$$$$ are flying out the window.

Thank god the deal went south.

FWIW The unbuilt McLean frameset is a tourer. It's a mess. I think I'll have Chris Kvale do his magic on it if he still wants to do it two summers from now.

I'll be retired then and looking for a project.
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Old 01-04-18, 06:52 PM
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Originally Posted by repechage View Post
I'm just waiting for the bike you designed and computer modeled.

So am I.

Love your ideas and planning.

Inspirational and gets my imagination off the ground.
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Old 01-04-18, 07:03 PM
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This one makes me twitch.

I would love to have one in my size.

Obviously, not to be.....

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Old 01-04-18, 07:14 PM
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Originally Posted by repechage View Post
I'm just waiting for the bike you designed and computer modeled.
I'm currently having issues with the dlms printing.
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Old 01-04-18, 07:21 PM
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Bikes: Miyata 610(66cm), Raleigh Record Ace (64 cm), GT vantara Hybrid (64cm), Nishiki International (64cm), Custom touring bike (66 cm) , Peugeot U 08 rat rod (64 cm), Trek 800 Burning Man helicopter bike

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when I decided to get back into cycling about 20 years ago I went up to Berkeley to a used bike store that buys bikes from students and resells them. Tons of cheap black mtn bikes that were too small. The only thing they thought I could ride at 6'5" was a 1980 66 cm Miyata 610. I still have it though it has morphed into a utility bike with 2" riser bars,and rear rack . Then about 5 years ago I hooked up with the bike Exchange. Shortly thereafter I was looking at a pile of bikes destined to be sent to Africa and spied a Raleigh Record Ace(also 1980) and bought it from the shop for $25. I overhauled it, put upright bars and fenders on it and bought a used Brooks B 17 for it and it became my fave. Then along came a 1994 GT Vantara Hybrid with 700c wheels and Shimano trigger shifters , my first bike with indexed shifting for $90. a few other bikes passed through my hands including a SR semi pro, a U08 and a custom touring bike, then A Nishiki International came into the shop and I bought it , put upright bars, a Brooks b 62? springer seat and a triple crank making it a 18 speed and one of the nicest rides I have.

Needing a bike for Burning Man, I found a $25. Trek 800 Antelope some kid wanted to get rid of before he got a new bike for Christmas. I put ape hanger bars on it and jacked the seat up as high as it would go, and surprisingly it is a very comfortable bike for me to ride. I feel like Easy Rider going down the street.

Always looking for a project, when my boss at the bike Exchange told me that there was a old (early 80's with square taper bottom bracket) Peugeot that was too messed up to rehab and that I could take it if I promised not to bring it back I inherited another project. I stripped all the crappy hardware off it, Sand blasted the frame, repainted it, and set it up with semi Porteur bars , 700 c wheels, 1x8 drivetrain with Shimano Deore rd, and flat pedals. This is my current fave, at 26 lbs a nice handling upright riding bike.

Lastly, though I am certain not the last bike in my life, is a crappy Lock And Roll 20 inch wheel 5 speed folding bike which even with everything at max height is too small for me , handles terribly, and when I got it as another gift from the shop, wouldn't stop worth s##t. I have taken it as a personal challenge to make it at least rideable. I removed the stamped steel front side pull brake and replaced it with a forged Diacomp unit and some Kool stop pads. Now it will at least stop. I also replaced the no name Freewheel with a Suntour Perfect from the bin. It may not work any better but then anything is an improvement.
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Old 01-04-18, 07:51 PM
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Originally Posted by gomango View Post
Thanks.

Crazy times. Almost sold it last summer as we have two young men in college atm.

$$$$$ are flying out the window.

Thank god the deal went south.

FWIW The unbuilt McLean frameset is a tourer. It's a mess. I think I'll have Chris Kvale do his magic on it if he still wants to do it two summers from now.

I'll be retired then and looking for a project.
Don't you dare! Your kids can each sell a kidney to finance their education, but there are no more McLeans coming down the pike.

And yes, I am kidding . . . mostly.
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Old 01-04-18, 08:05 PM
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Bikes: Canyon Endurance SL, De Rosa Professional, Eddy Merckx Corsa Extra, Schwinn Paramount, Motobecane Grand Record, Peugeot PX10, Serotta Nova X, Simoncini Cyclocross Special, Raleigh Roker, Pedal Force CG2 and CX2

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I began my history with lightweight road bikes in 1974 with the purchase of a new Schwinn Paramount. I was a teenage cycling enthusiast who worked at a bike shop when I wasn't involved in school activities. I worked at a large Schwinn dealer in Suburban Chicago and owning a Paramount was an easy decision.

While I kept the Paramount for almost 40 years, I never found the time to enjoy cycling regularly until about 12 years ago.

My vintage bike collection is to satisfy my curiosity about what I have missed over the years. I also fit a variety of tires and drivetrains on various bikes, providing me with a versatile collection.

In no particular order: De Rosa Professional, Eddy Merckx Corsa Extra, Pinarello Gavia, Schwinn Paramount, Motobecane Grand Record, Peugeot PX10, Serotta Nova X, Simoncini Cyclocross Special, Raleigh Roker, Origin8 monstercross, Pedal Force CG2 and CX2. All of these bikes are ready for a century ride and most are ridden a dozen times a year or more. I rode 3800 miles last year.

I have the Peugeot PX10 and a Motobecane Grand Record in addition to a Schwinn Paramount. These bikes are built from Reynolds 531 and feature clamp-on friction shifters. The French bikes are different from the Paramount, which is a more specialized road-race bike. Both of the French bikes are ready for Eroica. The PX10 can fit tires suitable for a gravel ride but still has road racing in its DNA. The Motobecane is more of a Randonneur.

My other C&V bikes are built from Columbus SPX, SLX or TSX. These bikes bridge the period of friction downtube shifters and Reynolds 531 tubing found on the earlier bikes and modern bikes with carbon or aluminum frames. These include a Serotta Nova Special X, De Rosa Professional, Eddy Merck Corsa Extra and a Pinarello Gavia. I use a wide range of indexed drivetrains on these bikes. Two have Dura Ace indexed downtube shifters, two have Campagnolo Chorus Ergo shifters, three have standard doubles, one has a triple, one has a freewheel, the rest have cassettes fitted. I've learned the tricks of what is compatible and what is fun to ride.

I now a have a diverse collection of bikes that are capable on a variety of paved or unpaved roads and paths. This includes a unique bike I didn't describe before, a Simoncini Cyclocross Special. It's a lugged steel frame built in Tuscany of Columbus tubing and is also a genuine Cyclocross race machine.

My modern bikes reflects my need for paved and unpaved use and feature contemporary technology. I have a carbon fiber road bike that gets used often, including road-race events. I have a modern carbon fiber disc brake gravel bike which takes me into deep corners of rural Missouri. I have an additional carbon fiber recreational Cyclocross bike equipped with fenders that I keep for rainy days and damp pavement. I have a older steel gravel bike that is now attached to a smart trainer for virtual cycling during impossible weather.

I feel like I've compressed 45 years of cycling into the last 12 years. It's been fun and it has kept me younger than I might otherwise would be.
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Old 01-04-18, 09:28 PM
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@gomango, I have to ask what that car is. It looks familiar and Italian. But I don't recognize any details. Sure looks nice!
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Old 01-04-18, 10:02 PM
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Originally Posted by ascherer View Post

...1971 Peugeot PX-10: This is a very special bike, although I don't ride it now for various reasons. I've had it for about 5+ years, but my history with it goes back to 1972. I learned how to ride and wrench in a class setting in high school when I was 15. This was my teacher's bike and it was became of my grail bikes, as it is for many. Over 26 years my teacher logged over 87k miles on it. I hadn't seen him since 1975, but I got back in touch with him in 2011 to thank him for giving me the gift of cycling. Not long after he asked me if I would take his Peugeot, since he hadn't ridden it for many years and he wanted someone (me) to take care of it...
Great story!

I don't think that even I know why I have the bikes I have except for these 2:



In 1978 I was working with a friend of mine in a bike shop in Santa Cruz, California that had a lot of high-end bikes and frames; Hetchins, Hurlow, Gios, Eisentraut, Masi, etc. But the frame that my friend and I both coveted was built by some guy whose name we had never heard before, Bruce Gordon. Neither of us could possibly afford that frame but I told myself that one day I would own one. My friend and I were both inspired by that frame to take up frame building. I built half a frame and discovered that I didn't have the patience for it. My friend built one frame, then another and another...Ten years later he was making his living building bike frames and playing in a rock and roll band. Recently I finally had the chance to buy this Bruce Gordon, built the same year that I first saw one of his frames.



My old Santa Cruz friend and I kept up the friendship established 4 decades ago. We've put in a lot of miles together. He has built a number of frames for me over the years. This one is the latest. I call it my "all-day" bike. It was a little bit of a collaboration: I shaped the fork crown and did a little shaping on the top of the seat tube. My friend did all the rest. This bike will be with me until I can't ride anymore.

Brent
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Old 01-05-18, 07:48 AM
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Every bike in the collection has its story about how it was once the most coveted thing. When I graduated high school back in '81, I was a bike nut of 4-5 years experience. I was a huge fan of Team Peugeot, Bernard Thevenet, their bikes, etc. Flush with cash from graduation along with my own savings, I wanted to purchase a custom Peugeot PRO 10. My father vetoed the idea telling meI would certainly and more sensibly need the money for college expenses. It was the only time in my life that his advice was bad. For years I lusted for one of those bikes. They were rare in their day, and harder still to find today. I didn't search constantly, but had my eye out for YEARS. Several years ago, I came across one in the precise size and in great original condition The build date is indicated a January of 1982, which would be exactly as per the normal 8 month wait for those bikes had I placed the order upon graduation in June 1981. It hasn't disappointed as it rides very well and is quite the swanky machine under its blue-collar decals....
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