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Old 01-08-18, 03:33 PM   #76
noglider 
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Jim's question seemed to deserve well considered responses, so it has taken me a long time to write mine. I even published it as a blog post.

A friend on bikeforums posted a public question: Why those particular bikes? In other words, what led to your selection of the bikes you have. Here is my answer.



1982 McLean

I call this my pride and joy, since it is so beautiful in every way, the ride, the workmanship, and the look. I bought it used at about a year old in 1983. I've had it longer than any of my other bikes. I originally equipped it with nearly all Campagnolo Nuovo Record components except for Super Record Cranks. I built the wheels myself, using Ambrosio Elite rims. This is a general purpose road racing bike, though I did take it on a four-night tour once with no difficulty. It offers capable handling at high speed. In about 1991, I had Peter Weigle repaint it and fit it with various brazed-on mounts. In recent years, I've replaced nearly everything with a Shimano 3x9 drivetrain. The bike is disappointingly heavy, though that doesn't detract from my enjoyment. Since the original owner told me he got it at a trade show, I wonder if the builder went cheap on tubes just to make a display frameset. The builder died at age 29, making my frameset a collector's item.



1974 Raleigh International

I had heard a lot about this frameset, so I wanted one badly. I waited until I could find one at a good price. I've built it as an all-purpose bike without much mind towards æsthetics. It has a 3x10 drivetrain, mustache handlebars, dynamo-powered lighting, and a front rack. I've commuted on it, taken fun rides on it, and I could do overnight tours on it. It's everything I had hoped it would be. I have 32mm tires on it, and I hope I can keep them when I eventually put fenders on it.



1971 Raleigh Super Course

I picked this out of the trash on bulk pickup day! I've rebuilt it many times. I consider it my testbed bike. The finish on the frameset is a shambles, and I'll probably remedy that one day. I've toured on it, commuted on it, shopped on it, and taken fun rides. It's not super light, but it climbs great for some reason. I'm about to rebuild it with a modern drivetrain. Lately, I ride gravel carriage roads on it. I built the current wheels way back in 1983. Often when I ride this bike, I tell myself that it's my favorite. It was never an expensive bike, but it rides almost better than it deserves to.



1994 Lemond RS titanium

This is a go-fast bike if ever there was one. Weight is 20 pounds or maybe a hair under. The lightness encourages me to pedal hard, and if it isn't much more energy efficient than my other bikes, my times on it are still very low because riding it hard is so rewarding. I built the wheels myself and aimed to keep them fairly light without being too expensive. I have 23 or 25 mm tires on it. I'm pretty sure it can't take wider tires.



1971 Raleigh Pro Track

I was racing at Kissena Velodrome in the summer of 2014. I already had a track racing bike, but when this came around, I couldn't resist. The difference in handling between the previous bike, a Leader, and the Raleigh, is pronounced. Clearly, Raleigh knew what they were doing.



1962 Rudge Sports

I've always had an affection for English three-speeds, and it is strongest for the Rudge. I got this, along with a lady's Robin Hood, at an estate sale. I paid a mere $30 for the pair of bikes. I don't like to ride this bike any distance, but it always puts a smile on my face.



2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

A friend offered this to me at a very low price. It's far from a performance bike, but the wide tires and upright handlebars are probably an advantage for me. I had difficulty managing a tandem bike in the first place, and when the bike has drop handlebars, I'm on the verge of dropping the bike, so this might be the perfect tandem for my wife and me. We've been riding it for about three years now and are still getting the hang of it. The longest we've ridden it in a day is 36 miles on a flat rail trail. I hope to take it further, eventually, especially on overnight tours. My idea behind a tandem is, having more stamina on a bike than my wife does, we can go longer distances than she can on a single bike. That hasn't come true yet, but I hold out hope that practice will get us there.



1975 Viscount

When I was a teenager, I wanted a Viscount. They were light bikes at the time. The marketing hype had me see them as fancier than they really were. A friend offered this to me. I lightened further it by removing the rear brake and derailleur drivetrain. First, I used a three-speed fixed gear hub, as a fun experiment. I didn't like that, so I replaced it with a traditional fixed gear hub. The bike weighs about 23 pounds. It's fun to bop around town on this thing. Riding fixed gear isn't a way of life for me as it is for some, but I enjoy it from time to time.



1973 Raleigh Twenty

This is a popular project bike. It's my second Twenty. I still don't enjoy riding it, so I'll sell it.



1996 Bianchi Volpe

I bought this used to reap the components off it, but a friend convinced me to keep it, expecting I would like it. I do like it, and I equipped it to be a do-everything bike, with rack, fenders, and dynamo lights. I'll be selling it now, as I prefer my International, which is also lighter.
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Old 01-09-18, 01:05 AM   #77
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2016 Trek 520:
A broken frame hanging in the shop, waiting to be recycled or repaired. I already had a desire for some sort of road bike type thing with bigger tire clearance. When I looked up the geometry, it was perfect in almost every way. Eventually, I had it repaired, found parts to build it up, and it's the closest I've had to a perfect "Do everything" bike. Just as fast as a road bike, fenders and a rack for commuting, clearance for gravel worthy tires when I need them, and it fits like a glove. I think the only thing that could ever replace it would be something custom with even more clearance.

1975 Raleigh LTD-3:
I've had a soft spot for 3-speeds since I owned my first years ago, and missed having one. They capture the joy of riding a bike better than anything else in my opinion. I found one hiding up stairs at work, and after throwing lots of money and time at it, it's the perfect city bike. There is no way I could ever come close to recouping the money spent on it, so I think it will be mine till the frame or I are dead.

1993 Giant ATX-780:
This one has been with me the longest. I had only been working at my first shop for a few months when someone wanted to trade it in. The store wasn't willing to give what the guy wanted for it, so I bought it instead. It was my size, had a bunch of LX stuff on it, and a sweet early 90's paint job. I didn't even consider why I wanted it, I just knew I had to have it. Now the only original part is the seatpost. It's been through 3-4 winters without much rust, now houses a 1x9 XT group, and is set-up as a very capable mountain bike. I've been tempted to try drop bars on it at some point.

???? Custom Single Speed
Another bike that was to be a trade-in at the shop. I was about to move away and thought I was going to be a messenger for awhile, so I bought this thing to turn into a bike for that. It had Basso decals on it, but did not fit any description of any production bike I could find. With a serial number of 004, lackluster welds, and some bizarre choices in the design of it, I've come to the conclusion it was a rookie framebuilder's first or second attempt at tig-welding a bike. Sub 11.0 dropouts suggest it was probably made 2005 or earlier. Geometry is half track bike, half touring bike. The end result is a really sweet single-speed road bike with lots of tire clearance, an aggressive fit that encourages me to ride as fast as I can, dynamo lighting so I don't have to worry about batteries, and just enough stability to handle snow and ice. If something bad were to happen to all of my bikes, I'd be most devastated by the loss of this one.

And those are the bikes I plan on keeping as I pare down my stable. Maybe I'll edit this to include some of the others.
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Old 01-09-18, 06:37 AM   #78
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
Jim's question seemed to deserve well considered responses, so it has taken me a long time to write mine. I even published it as a blog post.
Thank you, Tom.

In fact, I was interested in the motivation behind the various bikes more than the bikes' histories per se. Some of us seem to have had targets in mind, semi-grail bikes so to speak. That requires knowledge or personal experience in the bike biz far beyond mine. (I'm still looking for a Bianchissima Speciale Gruppognolo; they made only three that I know of.) Some of our acquisitions have been more opportunistic, not the result of careful searching for a particular model or a particular style.
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Old 01-09-18, 07:19 AM   #79
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Back in 1996, I was working in a factory and someone had left a copy of the Chicago Reader (weekly free hippy rag) in the break room.

Bored, I scanned the classified and found the following ad:



Knew nothing of the brand (or fancy bikes for that matter), but walked over to the Gold Coast to take a look. The rest is history.

EDIT: adding a pic since this has turned into a "post yr ride". Only original bits are frame and seatpost.


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Old 01-09-18, 08:32 AM   #80
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All my bikes have hand brazed steel frames made in Switzerland. If would buy something like that new it would cost me at least 2000 chf for the frameset alone. Because there are like 3 people left here in Switzerland that hand braze steel frames. Back in the 60ies there were around 100 bike brands here. That's why i bought old used bikes and restored them. 6 of them are 3-speeds one is a 5 speed. Means they are simple, reliable, sturdy, the parts are pretty cheap and can even be exchanged between the bikes. The frame geometries are slightly different. Ones are more agile, others are more comfortable. They have different handlebar forms. Some for upright "panorama" riding, some for more aerodynamic situations. They have different cog sizes. Means 7 bikes for 23 speeds . And different colors.
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Old 01-09-18, 08:47 AM   #81
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My original tastes were informed by my riding in my teens...like most of us. I lusted most for De Rosa and Merlin (especially Merlin), because that was the stuff that everyone most desired growing up, and because I rode a friend's De Rosa and Merlin, and they made my Specialized Sirrus, Cannondale and Miyatas look stupid. I always had a fondness for touring bikes because I did some touring, and my love of tandems comes from restoring a trash picked Schwinn town and country triplet with my dad when I was 13.

Later...my tastes expanded. Guys like CDM, IAB, Picchio Special...etc...made me appreciate the earlier stuff. I rode some and found it mixed...some I love, often it's too flexy for my tastes/weight. My appreciation for customs really began with Kellogg/Merlin, but also expanded with more time here. CDM arranged and suggested the Marnati, which is just a life defining bike.

Overall, I prefer more odd ball, smaller name stuff. Colnago interests me less than Marastoni...not because I have anything against Colnago, but because I find Marastoni more interesting. I really like the OS steel and ti tubing that came around in the 90s...it's a shame it was over shadowed by CF and aluminum, because, for my money, those are the nicest steel frames around. You don't have the workmanship of the pre-IC era, but you have amazing performance machines.

I love titanium...always have. I love its permanence. I love that you can't hide anything under paint. I love the color. I love the aesthetic of a well done MIG weld. I don't think bikes get too much nicer than a cambridge Merlin with the right fork.
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Old 01-09-18, 09:39 AM   #82
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ok - Point by point accounting, since the spirit of this seems to be in the individual bicycles, rather than the collective. Mostly in chronological order - not considering the transients.

1. 1974 Raleigh Superbe - it was my late uncle's bicycle. A size too large and in need of another round of refurbishng, but this one gets kept no matter what.

2. 1972 Fuji Finest - I was looking for something more "magical" than the Super Course I had acquired, simply because I'd heard there were better bicycles and I wanted to find out for myself. I found this one in a size that worked for me that was a mere 4 hour drive from me. It cleaned up nicely, and has probably been ridden more than any bicycle that I currently have. Everything about the frame and fork is original. It rides very nicely. Has been through two Seagull Centuries, and a few configurations. It even got me over a yearling groundhog that came out to play with a riding buddy and erratically placed itself 3 feet in front of me.

3. 1970 Raleigh Professional - I was on an e-Bay mission to find a "really nice" bicycle. Stumbled upon a horrendously repainted and poorly represented frame that the braintrust concurred was a 1969/1970 Raleigh Professional. I won the auction for $30.00 and change. It's a size larger than ideal for me, but I've put a lot into it - removing a stuck seat post, stripping it down, trying (and failing to paint it myself), acquiring appropriate bits for it, and eventually bargaining a spring skiing week to Dr. Deltron in exchange for a stunning paint job that does this justice. It has the distinction of being the only bicycle I've crashed as an adult.



4. 199x Giant Iguana - I had been through one C&O canal adventure on a Magna and there was no way that was going to repeat. I found this out in back of the Volunteers of America, and it cost me less than $15.00. It had been repainted and had a peace sign and a Grateful Dead head sticker. For years I had thought this was a Trek or a Bontrager until I stripped it down to become my "ride anywhere" bicycle. It now sports drop bars, 2 x 10 drivetrain, my first passable paint job and Rat Trap Pass tires. Haven't really given it much of a challenge yet, but its day will come.



5. 1977 Raleigh Team Professional - This mostly-stripped frame and fork was offered on CR for a very fair price, and it is exactly my size. Traded another ski week to Dr. Deltron for the "Crayola" paint job. I first set it up as a fixed gear, but now has a more modern drivetrain. It feels faster than it is, but it's a blast to ride. I found out last year that it is made of 753 tubing.



6. 1973 Raleigh Competition - another CR find. (I do have a thing for 1970s Raleighs) I had a heck of a time with it - the nylon BB didn't want to come out and the steerer threads were very fussy. I set it up as my fixed gear until I recently decided that it would become my gugified randoneuse. It is scheduled to make a journey west in a couple weeks.



7. 2000 Bob Jackson Arrowhead - Had seen this in a special, guided backroom tour of Merv's (a Shippensburg, PA LBS) a couple years prior to getting it. At the time, I really didn't have a functional go-fast bike (the others weren't yet built up). One year, when I got my annual bonus, I decided I'd see if he still had it. He did, but it was out on the sales floor. It is such a beautiful and light 853 bike, I bought it. It is a really sweet ride that keeps up with the spirited group pretty well.



8. 1974-ish Raleigh Grand Sports - I saw the evident gap in my collection of 1970's Raleighs and when this came up on CL here for a reasonable price, I made haste to acquire it. Was a little disappointed to find the Brooks saddle that was in the picture had been swapped out, but it came home with me. It rides quite nicely after cleaning it up.



9. 1962 Dunelt 3-speed (it's a ladies model). I responded to a CL ad, hoping for a parts bike. It is in remarkably good shape, and my wife intends to keep it around.

10. 1949 Raleigh Clubman - I had a 1954 Hetchins at the time. It fit me, but rather than feeling the spirit of the 1950's British Club scene when I took it out, I felt like the eyes of the papparazzi were affixed to me as if I were heading off to a fox hunt. I felt pretentious and ill at ease on it. I saw that clubman had this original paint warrior that he was pondering parting with, so I contacted him. I'm still debating whether or not to eventually get it fresh paint in the original scheme, but it has built up nicely into it's factory intended 4-speed configuration. I'm running it as a 650a with Col de la Vie tires, and having a blast on it. No longer searching for that British club bicycle.



11. 1981 Miyata 1000 - This came up on CR for a very generous price. I bought it for my wife. The paint is a bit rough, and it will otherwise get fully serviced before spring.

12. 1955-ish Viking Trackmaster - A friend saw my Viking Severn Valley (not a keeper) on my FB profile and offered his too-small, repainted, frame and fork (modified for brakes) to me for a fair price. Having just sold off my Hetchins, I went for it. This is now my fixed/SS bicycle.



13. 1971 Raleigh Competition - Gordo Trek found this at his co-op. It's the uncommon lilac color. That was in Rochester, NY, which is my home town. There's a longstanding lilac festival there each May. This was also the city where my uncle's bike shop was the only one that sold Raleigh's back in the 60's - 80's. This may or may not be one that he sold, but I'll tell the story that he might have. Sentimental value - check. Raleigh lightweight from the 1970's - check. rhm saddle - another check.



14. Late 1970's? Elswick Mistral - It's too large for either of us, but my wife came into the LBS with me, saw it, and decided we should have it. It has a nice look to it, even if its a bit heavy.

15. 1977 Argos - A couple months ago I felt the need to scratch the randoneuse itch. I put out the ISO notice (possibly driving nlerner and noglider slightly crazy), and also of CR. I got an offer for an Argos frame for a below market amount. I was thinking that it could be that randoneuse, but when I received it, I saw that it was far too nice a frame in apparently original livery. I had no idea that their level of building workmanship was so top notch, and I couldn't bear to consider doing anything other than build it up with period appropriate parts (aside from rims). This was a wonderful accidental acquisition, and another work in progress.
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Last edited by USAZorro; 01-09-18 at 07:05 PM. Reason: proofreading - and adding pictures
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Old 01-09-18, 05:38 PM   #83
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Zorro, great stories!

First I would love to see the Argos and the Clubman. And, how are you doing with the 4-speed? I assume it's a Sturmey-Archer, but which one?
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Old 01-09-18, 06:34 PM   #84
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Zorro, great stories!

First I would love to see the Argos and the Clubman. And, how are you doing with the 4-speed? I assume it's a Sturmey-Archer, but which one?
The Clubman has an FW. Getting it dialed in right has eluded me so far. Here it is as of early autumn. It will eventually get mud guards.



The Argos is sitting across the room. Am in the process of building wheels for it. I still need about 1/3 of the parts for it. Hoping to have it on the road by the end of March.

Cheers,

Z
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Old 01-09-18, 08:49 PM   #85
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I've only got the one C&V bike right now. How/why I got it:
I had been looking for a few months on CL for a vintage road bike (also my first road bike). By that time, I knew I just wanted vintage, diamond frame, decent condition, not low end, and for it to actually fit me & be in my budget. I didn't care too much about the brand, tubing, or components...it was hard enough to find something decent in my size at a decent price.

I had the cash set aside & was checking CL throughout the day, every day...losing patience, I created a "wanted ad", posted it, then decided to check CL one last time that night. Three down the list was the ad, posted 30 mins prior, for the 87 Schwinn Prelude. It checked all my boxes, would fit, and a plus that it was pink, original, Columbus Tenax, and $125. I emailed the guy immediately and went straight over to pick it up. He wanted me to come the next morning but I convinced him to let me come that night, if I could make it over 3 cities in 30 minutes on a Friday evening on I-95 lol...I wasn't convinced it would still be there the next day.

I love this bike, though I haven't had anything similar to compare it to. It's kept me busy all year, changing things out and getting the fit down. It's the first year I haven't bought another bike since I've started riding again. Now that she is almost complete though, I do plan on getting another...and it'll likely be done in a similar way.
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Old 01-09-18, 09:47 PM   #86
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Originally Posted by Hardrock23 View Post
I've only got the one C&V bike right now. How/why I got it:
I had been looking for a few months on CL for a vintage road bike (also my first road bike). By that time, I knew I just wanted vintage, diamond frame, decent condition, not low end, and for it to actually fit me & be in my budget. I didn't care too much about the brand, tubing, or components...it was hard enough to find something decent in my size at a decent price.

I had the cash set aside & was checking CL throughout the day, every day...losing patience, I created a "wanted ad", posted it, then decided to check CL one last time that night. Three down the list was the ad, posted 30 mins prior, for the 87 Schwinn Prelude. It checked all my boxes, would fit, and a plus that it was pink, original, Columbus Tenax, and $125. I emailed the guy immediately and went straight over to pick it up. He wanted me to come the next morning but I convinced him to let me come that night, if I could make it over 3 cities in 30 minutes on a Friday evening on I-95 lol...I wasn't convinced it would still be there the next day.

I love this bike, though I haven't had anything similar to compare it to. It's kept me busy all year, changing things out and getting the fit down. It's the first year I haven't bought another bike since I've started riding again. Now that she is almost complete though, I do plan on getting another...and it'll likely be done in a similar way.
Cool story and one we can relate to as in "we've all been there".
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Old 01-09-18, 11:59 PM   #87
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I'll just cover my favorite 3

For me I was always big into bmx bikes as a kid. I only ever had cheap department store bikes though, and I'd break stuff weekly, so I became a pretty good bike mechanic and found that I was actually very mechanically inclined! Like most kids though I pretty much fogot all about bicycles once I got into girls, cars, and partying.

Fast forward to age 24 and I had decided to give up drinking (that had been a huge problem for me since age 17) and I was looking for a hobby to get into to keep me out of trouble, and give me something to do besides party and drink. One day I saw a picture of an old GT Performer bmx bike and suddenly a light bulb went off! "I should build an old school bmx bike!".

I got really into it restoring, building, and selling custom bmx bikes, and did that for about 2 years. I was starting to get bored with that though. I don't really ride bmx at all anymore because I'm not into crashing like I was as a kid, and the bikes are so simple that there wasn't enough mechanical challenges to keep things interesting.

I had always admired the look of vintage road bikes, but had found every one I had ever ridden to be terribly uncomfortable, and I was never into racing, so I never owned one, or even learned anything about them. The fact that they're far more complicated than bmx bikes, and that I knew nothing about them made me think that restoring one might be something fun to do!

In December of 2016 I started searching locally for a cheap road bike to restore with the intention of selling it when I was done since I didn't like riding them. It wasn't long before I found a friend of a friend who had a rusty 1984 Centurion Elite GT he was selling for $50. I could tell it was a decent bike and would be easy to resell, so I bought it.

Through the process of researching and restoring it I learned that it wasn't a racing bike at all, but a touring bike, and a really nice one at that! Plus it was just my size! After learning all about what a touring bike was I found that it was pretty much exactly the kind of bike I wanted, but never knew existed! That's when I started falling in love with the Centurion, and once I rode it for the first time that sealed the deal. I was IN LOVE!!!

I've spent the past year slowly customizing it, and it's still not finished yet, but here is my 1984 Centurion Elite GT 15.



I loved my Elite GT so much that I started looking at Centurion's other models as well, and found that I pretty much loved all Centurion bikes! Thinking about all the accessories I wanted to add to my touring bike, and how heavy it was going to become, I decided to start looking for a lightweight go-fast Centurion to add to my collection. My favorite being the red and silver 1985 Ironman for it's classic lug lined paint job, relaxed geometry, and generous tire cleaclearances. I never really expected to find one. Much less the super clean, one owner bike that I did!

I still have yet to tear it down for a full service job, but here is my 1985 Centurion Ironman



After acquiring the Ironman I figured the next logical step would be a vintage mountain bike right?! Still loving the Centurion brand I started checking out Diamond Backs since they were a sister brand to Centurion, and owned by the same company called WSI. I really wanted somthing with classic 2 tone paint, and lined lugs just like the rest of my bikes. I was absolutely delighted when I came across this 1983 Diamond Back Ridge Runner on Craigslist only an hour away from me! I ended up making a trade deal for it, and I'm now in the process of restoring it. Here's a picture from when I first brought it home though.

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Old 01-10-18, 07:36 AM   #88
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I always take note of @jimmuller comments and questions. This one is a good one that I have asked myself but still am puzzling an answer.

I have been into self powered wheeled vehicles from childhood. I think motorcycles were the inspiration. I pretended to be driving one with my first tricycle!

I think I remember all the bikes I have owned but not the marques. The first was a black and chrome Murry, I think. I stripped that one down and built it up several times. I like the stripped configuration, probably due to the reduction in weight. It had a tank with horn and dual lights along with fenders and a rear rack. My dad had some surplus military back packs from WWII that I mounted on the rear rack. It was fully assembled when it was stolen while parked at a hospital entrance where my Mom worked. This bike introduced me to freedom in the neighborhood. I explored everywhere with it. So it was early in my life, around 11 years old, that I appreciated freedom. Being a latch key kid, I had time to ride. It was also my first experience with wrenching on a bike. I remember my first cross threaded nut was the rear axle nut on the non-drive side!

I think the replacement was a red Hercules “English racer.” For some reason, I don’t remember wrenching on this one, just rode it. We moved a couple of times with hilly conditions and heavy traffic impacting the exploring. Then we moved to Japan.

The bike in Japan was a blue 5 speed with a funky, probably Simplex like, RD and a drum rear brake. I should dig out the slides and scan it.

Before packing up to move Hawaii, I bought a black Bridgestone 10 speed. Not many memories of that either. It was given to someone at some point, I think when we moved to Germany. I had it in India and rode it there a lot.

In Germany, I bought a UO-8. Wanted the PX10 but didn’t have the cash. I had enough to buy a pair of tubular wheels though. On serious rides, I would ride the sew-ups. Clinchers for commuting. This time frame is 1968 – 1971. I rode that bike a lot. I remember doing 50 miles round trip in 2:50. Took it back with me to college and rode it there for a couple of years until I decided to sell it because of wear. I didn’t know enough to replace parts! Should have kept it.

There was a bike shop at the end of the small town where the college was located. He had some nice bikes there and I learned about Campagnolo parts. Now I got the lust for a quality bike! The one he had that I lusted after was a Motobecane le Champion, price $315.

As I was leaving that college to attend OSU (OREGON STATE), I picked up a used 72 Motobecane Le Champion ($200) that many of you may have seen posted here.

Marriage, school, work and rain snuffed out my bike riding and later kids, to the tune of 30 years. In 2007 I finally started riding because of a coworkers encouragement. Since I had purchased the RockHopper in 1998, I used that to commute, with the goal of getting back on the corn cob block Le Champion when my legs were stronger. We lived on a hill with a steep climb.
My curiosity about the value of the Le Champ, as a result of an accident in 2009, caused me to find BF. If you have read my posts, you know the rest of the story.

Why do I have what I have? Curiosity and the love of speed. I learned that Colnago was a special bike and because I was aware of Eddy's popularity when I was in Europe, it became a grail kind of bike. With a broken arm from the accident, I found the Specialissimo on CL in Hood River (for you Portlanders) for slightly more than $500. I got it for less. The ride was unlike the Moto and I loved it, still do. With more participation in BF, I started lusting after Italian bikes, Chrome lugs, stays and forks. My preference and appreciation is for Campy stuff but second is Suntour Superbe Pro.

Most of my interest is a result of feeling free on a bike, either with or without an IC engine. It is a place where I have to face myself and my limitations along with testing and improving. Closely coupled is the Mechanical Engineer in me that loves to wrench and learn why. Quality is also a key component in the selection.

So that doesn’t always manifest itself in the purchase of a bike, but mostly. I won’t go for the bargain store brands. My admiration is more like Vanilla, Sachs, and other custom quality bikes that I don’t have. That being said, I also like the top tier bikes. Steel is real to me.

I suspect the next bike will be more tour oriented, unless I can find a red De Rosa bargain in my size (59-60). Current collection is in my signature.
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Old 01-10-18, 07:19 PM   #89
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I always take note of @jimmuller comments and questions. This one is a good one that I have asked myself but still am puzzling an answer.

I have been into self powered wheeled vehicles from childhood....
@SJX426, I am honored by your opening paragraph. Thank you.

The second bit I quoted resonates with me strongly. Human-powered transportation has fascinated me much of my life. I've spent hundreds of thousands of steps hiking and being fascinated by the concept that one could cover such distances over rugged terrain all on foot. When I was younger a bicycle was a ticket to freedom. When I learned about and eventually graduated to lightweight "adult" bikes the concept of covering automobile-scale distances with only human power, without an engine!, rang every bell in my spirit of adventure. The idea that one could go 100 miles with the power in one's legs alone was and still is astounding. Back then 100 miles was a long distance even by car, not something one did every day. Granted a bike takes more time, but such a time it is!

Maybe that's why my bikes tend to be the go-fast road sort. I rode my childhood clunkers on the paths through local woods and got my fill of the mtb experience long before such bikes existed. For the real adventure it has to be a road bike going far beyond the neighborhood, going to places adults drove to. The adventure bells still ring.

The bikes here and their stories have been wonderful. Thank you all for sharing. Keep them coming.

(I'm going to have to post a few pics. It seems to be the thing to do!)
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Old 01-10-18, 10:24 PM   #90
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I'll bite..
I have a large collection on Cannondales so.
1998 XR800-I needed a commute bike and it came up on Craigslist at a cheap price.

1999 Silk Road 800-I had been kind of looking for one for a while. Unique and you rarely see them. A buddy had reached S-1 and literally gave me the frame for the cost of a sandwich.

1999 CAAD3 Stars and Stripes-My mentor, and boss at the time, that got me back into cycling was hit while riding his carbon Allez. He bought the full DA Stars and Stripes R4000 as a replacement. I don't know how many hours I spent sucking his wheel behind that bike. When the chance to buy one like it came up, I bought one.

2000 CAAD4 Stars and Stripes Saeco Cafe de Machine- My other mentor owned one and I always liked the way it looked. Patience finally paid off on EBay.

2002 CAAD 5 Stars and Stripes-In May of 2002 I had put a little over 5000 miles on my CAAD 2 in three years and had new bike-itis. We went to the local LBS and he said he didn't have a complete bike, but he had something I might want and brought up the most gorgeous frame I had ever seen. Sadly, the bottom bracket had a flawed weld and two years later was given the choice between a CAAD 7 or a 6/13. All was not lost, a month after doing a warranty exchange for the 6/13. I found another Stars and Stripes frame on EBay.

2002 CAAD5 Stars and Stripes/Helen's Cycle Slice-I had heard rumors there had been a few TT frames painted to match the CAAD5 S/S bikes. One finally showed up on Ebay.

2004 6/13-This bike has survived ten Death Rides two Carson Valley Centuries, dozens of trips up Mt Diablo, and many other adventures. When I am no longer able to ride, this one will probably go on the wall in a retirement home with me.

2004 Litespeed Solano-back in the dark ages, I helped put on the Solano Bicycle Classic. At the time, Litespeed supplied the neutral support bikes to Mavic. I had a chance to ride an as yet unnamed Litespeed. Six month later, it came out as the Solano. Four years later I finally tracked one down.

2007 System Six-Why? Naked carbon and aluminum just look cool!

2011 Super Six-I built it up as a replacement for the 6/13 in 2012. I had not bought the CAAD3, 4, or System Six. I ended up taking the bike to Texas with me for five months in 2013. I managed to put almost 2400 miles on it. A month before I was supposed to come home, I T-Boned a dog. At first I thought it was okay, then found a crack at the top of the seat tube. The frame is hanging in the rafters, maybe someday I will get it fixed.

2014 SuperSix Evo. It was cheaper to buy a complete 105 equipped bike and move the DA 7800 group from the 2011 than have the other one fixed and repainted. I have done a lot of tweaks to it, but of all the bikes it would be the first to go if I had to thin the heard.

2001 Burley Duet Tandem-it started life as a Burley factory demo. I picked it up at the Cow Palace velo swap in 2004 or 05 thinking my wife and I could start riding together. I doubt I have put 100 miles on it. Every time I suggest selling it I get a dirty look.

I keep telling my wife the bikes are cheaper and easier to store than classic cars.
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Old 01-11-18, 10:47 AM   #91
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I dabbled in motocross in my youth , -- as cross training for MX , i rode a mountain bike, a Bridgestone MB-6,

later on when it became apparent that MX was probably not going to pay my way through college, i sold my bikes and used some of the proceeds to buy my first road racer,

That was the early 90's - the bike (a very early Marin road bike) was in a very loud neon colorway, had oversize tubing, was tig welded and most importantly- had wide handlebars . I thought the painted 105SC group on it looked awesome too, -- i just adjusted the seat and slammed the bars and rode the wheels off it -- what can i say, life was simpler then for me

A few other people i knew and respected rode Centurion Ironmans, -- which shared the common theme of loud paint jobs -- loved those things too. Even had a Criterium Cannondale back then, another in the "performance first" camp

So that was it ---- fast and loud. Kind of like the red, white and blue Paramount i recently added to the collection

My tastes refined a bit and i do lean a little to the Italian side of the equator also, (well, lean pretty heavilly) but the majority of my bikes are somewhat interchangeable in the role they play, ---- drop bar road racers, predominately steel, and although i like lugs, i have no prejudices against tig welded OS bikes, or even aluminum bikes.

My foray into modern carbon has not been good, but i think thats due to fit issues due to rationalizing buying too small a bike with too short a top tube-- my rides on the bike have convinced me the material has merit though, - But when i have so many nice steel bikes to ride, why bother i say


I like traditional Italian racing geometry the best, and any bike in the fleet has to fit, or at least be close enough , --- and with the exception of a couple of true wall hangers, i try to keep everything ready to ride at a moments notice with just a spritz of air for the tires and maybe spin on a set of pedals. (Of course a recent pic thread i posted showing everything dusty and in disarray might say otherwise, -- but straightening up my mess will give me something to do until my work gets busy again)

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Old 01-11-18, 11:00 AM   #92
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@turkey9186 -- a separate pic thread showcasing your Stars n Stripes Cannondales would be really cool some day if you can
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Old 01-11-18, 12:47 PM   #93
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Picked up this 1961 Raleigh Sports last night probably paid too at 75 much but it is all original in pretty good working shape to start out with but needing total refurbish. The Guy had it since 1967.


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Old 01-11-18, 01:11 PM   #94
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This 1959 Robin hood Sports for $70 on Sat. It is in very nice shape. Its been on the Lake Pepin ride event 3 times. I since found it featured in this article.
http://alpenatweed.blogspot.com/2011...ds-of-fun.html


59 Robinhood 3.jpg

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Old 01-11-18, 03:06 PM   #95
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When I started with C&V it was a shotgun blast. I'd see something and buy it-a Centurion, a Colnago, a Trek, a Bridgestone, a Fuji. Slowly I narrowed it down to California makers, or those with a relationship to California makers. It has become a bit of a search for ties to Eisentraut and Masi, with some forethought and some luck....and some stretching.


It started with a Craigslist Eisentraut from Austin, then a Masi GC from Chicago. I did some more research and created a many tentacled family tree of sorts. There was a connection between Eisentraut and Oscar Wastyn, so I got a Paramount-not a Wastyn Paramount, but a Paramount. Then the Wizard came. A couple of Medici's. A Tesch. A Trek 760 because some folks went from Masi to Trek (Tesch and Starck). A Santana tandem for awhile-momma didn't like being the stoaker....A Steelman. An Ed Litton and a Skip Hujsack came along.


Some other California builders have snuck in as well. Dave Holland, Paul Sadoff/Rock Lobster, Curtis Inglis/Retrotec. Even let some east coast influence in from Tom Kellogg with a Spectrum Super Ti.


Robin, my other half, started racing on Landsharks, so we have a couple of those as well. From the California days. She is also partial to steel in her modern bikes, so there is a Gunnar and a Ritchey Break Away as well.


We like bikes and we like domestic content when it is possible. The exceptions being the current day MTB's and the Surly's.
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Old 01-12-18, 05:37 AM   #96
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The Clubman has an FW. Getting it dialed in right has eluded me so far. Here it is as of early autumn. It will eventually get mud guards.



The Argos is sitting across the room. Am in the process of building wheels for it. I still need about 1/3 of the parts for it. Hoping to have it on the road by the end of March.

Cheers,

Z
Zorro, I have a 1952 Rudge that is waiting for basement space to get cleaned up. It came with an AW 3-speed hub and a trigger that is capable of switching a 4-speed hub. I found an FG, which is an FW with an integral hub generator, all claimed to work. I can't really tell until it's built up.

Mark Stonich of BikeSmithDesign, who designed and sells a cotter press and a fixed BB cup tool, has thoughts about the "F" hubs; worth it to talk to him!

I also like the Peter Kohler blog, https://on-the-drops.blogspot.com/20...erne-1952.html, which has articles on perhaps a dozen models of Raleigh/Rudge/Humber club bikes, and the factory long-distance riders. Lots of images of catalog pages!
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Old 01-12-18, 07:09 AM   #97
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Zorro, I have a 1952 Rudge that is waiting for basement space to get cleaned up. It came with an AW 3-speed hub and a trigger that is capable of switching a 4-speed hub. I found an FG, which is an FW with an integral hub generator, all claimed to work. I can't really tell until it's built up.

Mark Stonich of BikeSmithDesign, who designed and sells a cotter press and a fixed BB cup tool, has thoughts about the "F" hubs; worth it to talk to him!

I also like the Peter Kohler blog, https://on-the-drops.blogspot.com/20...erne-1952.html, which has articles on perhaps a dozen models of Raleigh/Rudge/Humber club bikes, and the factory long-distance riders. Lots of images of catalog pages!
Thanks for the tips. I'm familiar with Peter's blog and articles. His article on the Clubman was my guide for determining what to look for. I had the opportunity to be on a few group rides with him before I moved away from Pennsylvania. He's a good guy and has a lot of knowledge. I've bought both of those tools from Mark (for this project, actually). Any hints on adjusting the chain to get it to shift through all 4 gears without hitting a dead spot would be great.
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Old 01-12-18, 11:56 PM   #98
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My dad's Rockhopper got me back into cycling in college. This was bone-stock when it came to me and I slapped on some slicks to start. Today most everything has been swapped out and it only sees the road on the way to the trailhead. It's a touch small, but fits with the current setup. The smaller frame size is actually a plus in some circumstances - it feels like a bigger BMX to toss around in the woods. A dropper post would be nice. I've had it out for maybe 6hr at a stretch without any issue, so I'd call the fit good enough. I love to let 'er rip in the hilly New England woods.



Speaking of BMX... I got this Giant MOSH in high school after my department store BMX was stolen. Having a father who was a mechanic before I came along meant I was wrenching on bikes shortly after learning to ride them. This was the first bike that I started swapping parts on while also playing with fit and gearing. The abandoned housing development at the end of my street grew some dirt jumps pretty quickly, and those grew along with my friends and me. Fun stuff that I'd hesitate to do now that I don't bounce quite as well.



After I'd been riding the Rockhopper with slicks for a while a friend bought a Centurion Pro Tour 15 that he knew was a deal and would never fit him. It fit me like a glove and got me onto C&V road bikes. Unfortunately, the DS chainstay was chewed up by the previous owner and I decided to retire it before it retired me -- It'll soon be a nice wall art display.



Before retiring the Pro Tour I found a CAAD 9 that I love yet hardly ride anymore. I need to fix that pronto. I've got the build pretty close to where I want it for now, though a compact crank would be nice. This one might see some 10 or 11sp Chorus or Record at some point. Lighter wheels, too. Great frameset. This one's best for fast rides over rolling hills - there's plenty of those here.



Then I found a good deal on the Colnago. This was the first build from the frame up -- granted, with no-brainer Super Record -- but it got me hooked on building bikes. The fit is spot-on and this one eventually saw my first century at the 2015 L'Ombra installment with some of the folks here...looking forward to another C&V ride soon. The frame's provenance and some additional sentimental value will keep this one as a lifetime bike.



After I got the Colnago frameset and before I'd finished building it up my local shop at the time called me up seeing if I wanted a free old bike... someone had dropped off a Motobecane Grand Touring to see if they'd recycle it and I was happy to help. It's a bit too small with drops, but Nitto Albatross bars come in right around where the mid-point between the drops and tops would normally be for me, and with good reach. I re-dished the rear wheel when I converted it to single speed for the bike paths I had around my apartment then. This one's soon to be my first fixed gear.



At some point I bought a stock Windsor Carrera Sport for cheap off CL. Maybe not long after the Centurion. I rode it a bit and eventually disassembled thinking I might paint it. Nope. Then after riding the Colnago for a bit I started reading about 650b conversions and my mind came back to it. I built my first wheelset for this bike and had fun riding it for a while, eventually deciding I needed something a bit less cumbersome when deeper into the woods. This one's currently stripped back to the frameset for the most part, I need to find something to do with it or pass it on. I don't have an IGH bike yet...



After the Windsor 650b experiment I grabbed a 753 Woodrup frameset from forum member @fender1. My next project is building a set of 126mm 7sp cassette 7401/TB 14 wheels for this with ~28mm tires. This is the light-duty off road vehicle. The rear derailleur is fun in order to accommodate the gear range, I took the cage and lower pivot bolt from an RD-M950 and swapped it onto the RD-7402 body.



A few summers back now I found a great deal on a very early Klein thanks to a forum member. Drillium by none other than @Drillium Dude. This one just needs wheels as well. I've been slacking on it. I have some Weyless hubs from @rhm and black anodized Arc en Ciel rims, just need to order spokes and to get my arse in gear and ride the thing! The early R&D on this bike, plus the fact that it was built about a 2hr car ride away really makes this one interesting to me.



The International from @gugie is my daily driver at this point. He sent me the modified frameset with calipers, headset, fenders and custom racks (including low riders I need to camp with) and I built it up from there. Wheels from rhm. The wide tires and gear range gobble up pavement and trails that are very much not pavement; low trail helping on the slow technical stuff or when I've got a bunch of "groceries" in the handelbar bag. Circling back a bit, I see the Woodrup and this being perfect compliments to much of my riding. The Woodrup being lighter and also more stable at higher speeds while still having a wide gear range plus ample carrying capacity with a frame bag, and the International being a mule that's willing to go anywhere and do most things well. Time to finish the Woodrup and find out.


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Old 01-13-18, 07:06 AM   #99
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There are lots of things I like when it comes to bikes, that may all trigger a buy. But rarely it is just love at first sight.

However, that was the case with this frame. It was sitting at a swap meet and caught my eye because of its vibrant purple color. A brand I'd never heard of, no interesting parts. Just a frame of a kind (age, size) that I already had plenty of. I decided I really didn't need another one, bought a nice TA triple crank set form the seller, and moved on.

But I couldn't put it out of my head. So pretty. Every time I passed that stall again, I would look, hoping it'd be gone. But no. Hours later, when it was time to go home, I passed it again. Still there. I measured it, hoping it would too small after all. No. Perfect. So I gave in and paid the €50 the seller wanted for it.



I took my time with the build, to make sure it would do the frame justice and would be as nice to ride as it is to look at. Four years on, and I'm still in love with it. Whereas the rest of my bikes are mostly stored out of sight, the one is always kept close, either in the living room, the hallway or my study.


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Old 01-13-18, 04:15 PM   #100
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I can see why you were drawn to it, fabulous color to start, great looking overall. Can we be enlightened to what it actually is, my spidey sense has got nothing even though there is a pretty good peek of the headbadge.


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There are lots of things I like when it comes to bikes, that may all trigger a buy. But rarely it is just love at first sight.

However, that was the case with this frame. It was sitting at a swap meet and caught my eye because of its vibrant purple color. A brand I'd never heard of, no interesting parts. Just a frame of a kind (age, size) that I already had plenty of. I decided I really didn't need another one, bought a nice TA triple crank set form the seller, and moved on.

But I couldn't put it out of my head. So pretty. Every time I passed that stall again, I would look, hoping it'd be gone. But no. Hours later, when it was time to go home, I passed it again. Still there. I measured it, hoping it would too small after all. No. Perfect. So I gave in and paid the €50 the seller wanted for it.



I took my time with the build, to make sure it would do the frame justice and would be as nice to ride as it is to look at. Four years on, and I'm still in love with it. Whereas the rest of my bikes are mostly stored out of sight, the one is always kept close, either in the living room, the hallway or my study.


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