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Why those particular bikes?

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Why those particular bikes?

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Old 01-13-18, 07:12 PM
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steelbikeguy
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Originally Posted by Colnago Mixte View Post

damn... that's a great comparison!

Not a bad movie either.. Kubrick did some incredible work.. just re-watched Dr. Strangelove the other week.


Steve in Peoria
but formerly at MCAS Yuma, fixing aircraft in the 3rd MAW.
..and with memories of marching in the barracks at MCRD San Diego. Must have been a very rare day when it rained.
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Old 01-13-18, 09:37 PM
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The long version.

Needing a means for exercise, after a long hiatus, amongst other things, I tried cycling again, and it stuck. Quite frankly, it's fun.

Like I say, it was a long hiatus and stopping at the LBS, I was quite stunned at the changes that had occured. I lurked on the road forum for a couple years as I was getting my legs. I had 2 off-topic bikes during that time, the first being run-over accidentally by my spouse. Got another, and while everything was "different", it all seemed the same to me. I then had a thought, why not try a vintage bike, that has to be different.

I never had any nostalgic feelings about just anything, but as a kid, one of the older neighbor kids bought a bike all the way from Chicago. It was a Cinelli. Also, I was and still am very interested in the history of cycling and it's interconnections. I quickly learned of Campagnolo's beginning dominance with the Gran Sport. I figured the era when the "first" parallelogram derailleur has got to be different from Shimano brifters. Right?

So after waiting for some time, the Model B came up and I jumped. Right size. Most interesting combination of parts. It did come with a a Huret TdF. And I tried to like it, but it is really a piece of crap. I ride the Gran Sport. I kept the TdF. And as it turns out, entirely different from my modern road bike.

Cinelli_Model_B 004 by iabisdb, on Flickr



After the Cinelli, I got the vintage bug. Started the usual scanning of CL and ebay. Found some interesting bits at an LBS closing. Found a cheap Olmo frame from a CR and made a fixed gear over 10 years ago. I wanted to try it. Frame was too small. It didn't take, I sold it. (Fast forward to 4/5 years ago when I converted my commuter to fixed gear, it took. But I'll get to that later).

Olmo 001 by iabisdb, on Flickr



I was commuting with a road bike and didn't care for it. So from the same guy who got me the Olmo, got me a nice shiny chrome Torpado. Built it like the Italian Sport bikes, 3-speeds, cross between a city bike and a road bike. And it had the uber-cool Cordorino integrated stem/bars/levers. But I had the worst luck with this bike. One of the pedals "disintegrated" while riding. Derailleur was fussy. Snapped a steel crank. I'd like to think it was due to my enormous quads, but I decided rightly or wrongly, vintage was too much maintenance for commuting.

Torpado1 by iabisdb, on Flickr



Then, nine years ago, I went inexpensive, modern aluminum for the commuter. Held up to today, although it is now a fixed gear, has a rear fender and a Cambium saddle.

Commuter 004 by iabisdb, on Flickr



Off-topic, but at the same time, Cinelli was coming out with their new stainless steel tubing. I saw a picture from the Milan bike show. Shiny like chrome. I'm very much like a monkey, I like shiny things. I would have never bought the frame due to price, but it was the 08/09 crash, gas was expensive and scooters were hot. i flipped a Vespa for a ridiculous amount and I got the frame. I also built it to 7.0kg and could very easily get it to the UCI limit of 6.9 to show steel can be as light like carbon.

Cinelli XCR with Super Record 001 by iabisdb, on Flickr



Back on topic. I read about Cinelli's racing career and the thought of a prewar Vittoria Margherita bike intrigued me. I mean, it has to be different from modern and Gran Sport. Right? But that was a tough nut to crack and when I saw the 1948 Frejus, I thought, that could be a good start. Never could get the RD to shift while pedalling, odd thing. When I did finally found the prewar Frejus, I used this one to help finance the buy.

1948 Frejus 004 by iabisdb, on Flickr




And then the heavens opened, and I found my prewar Frejus. Nough said.

_MG_8990 by iabisdb, on Flickr




Next was the the Bianchi Gran Sport. I really like those Sport bikes and no one did it as well as Bianchi. Just classy. I rode it for a while, but they never made those bigger than a 54. Too small and it had to go. So sad.

Bianchi Sport 099 by iabisdb, on Flickr





Then, after accumulating a bunch of crap in the parts bin, I decided on getting a cheap frame to make my Sunday-going-to-church bike. You would think I would have learned about frame size. Maybe it was wishful thinking. But in the end, it had to go.

1953 Bianchi Selvino 033 by iabisdb, on Flickr




I had a Gran Sport. I had a Vittoria Margherita,. Now I had to try Cambio Corsa, the other great Italian derailleur. Had to be different. Right? And while the Pecorari was a nicely made neat bike, it just didn't take. Kinda of like my first go at fixed gear, I wasn't feeling it. So it also had to go. I'll likely give Cambio Corsa another try in the future. Maybe.

Pecorari 001 by iabisdb, on Flickr
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Old 01-13-18, 09:37 PM
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Part due, due to the 10 image limit.

Soon after the Pecorari, the Viscontea pista fell into my lap. Everyone should have a track bike. Right? Plus I really love the top of the line Italian bike that is Campagnolo free. Campagnolo is so common, it is refreshing not to see it sometimes.

Viscontea 001 by iabisdb, on Flickr




Needed a bike for the cabin. The early 60s Umberto Dei frame has the clearance for fat tires for the fire roads. Those roads are rough so having STIs is nice.

Umberto Dei 01 by iabisdb, on Flickr





I haven't finished it, this is a before picture. The next frontier for me is pre-derailleur stuff. Pre-carving lugs. Totally prehistoric. Gotta be different from the other bikes. Right? 1920s Frejus.

Before_Frejus01 by iabisdb, on Flickr



And finally, someday, an entirely custom, designed by me, stainless steel commuter with electronic IGH (maybe) and belt drive just for something entirely different.

Gregario01 by iabisdb, on Flickr
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Old 01-14-18, 03:22 AM
  #104  
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Originally Posted by merziac View Post
I can see why you were drawn to it, fabulous color to start, great looking overall. Can we be enlightened to what it actually is, my spidey sense has got nothing even though there is a pretty good peek of the headbadge.
It is a Toortelboom, from Belgium. Close-up of the headbadge:



What I've been able to dig up on the brand is here.
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Old 01-14-18, 03:49 AM
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Tx, well at least I think I've heard of them. Seems to me I remember a beer with that name too.

Originally Posted by non-fixie View Post
It is a Toortelboom, from Belgium. Close-up of the headbadge:



What I've been able to dig up on the brand is here.
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Old 01-14-18, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by iab View Post
The long version. <....snip....>

Next was the the Bianchi Gran Sport. I really like those Sport bikes and no one did it as well as Bianchi. Just classy. I rode it for a while, but they never made those bigger than a 54. Too small and it had to go. So sad.

Bianchi Sport 099 by iabisdb, on Flickr

boy, that's just too cool! I'm not sure that I could have let that go!

I appreciate the history of your collection. Was there a mention of the time span for this evolution?

In contrast, my collection is much more static. The bike that has been with me the longest is a custom that I got in 1989. Of the bikes I've bought since then, only two have managed to escape my clutches.... and I have some misgivings about one of those.

Steve in Peoria
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Old 01-14-18, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by merziac View Post
Tx, well at least I think I've heard of them. Seems to me I remember a beer with that name too.
Well, there was Oranjeboom.
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Old 01-14-18, 04:30 PM
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Originally Posted by steelbikeguy View Post
I appreciate the history of your collection. Was there a mention of the time span for this evolution?
I stopped cycling in 1984, started again in 2004. Bought the Cinelli in the winter of 06/07. The dates on my Flickr site are pretty good if you have greater interest in the other bikes. Although I could have taken updated pictures at a later date.
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Old 01-14-18, 04:47 PM
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Originally Posted by iab View Post
I stopped cycling in 1984, started again in 2004. Bought the Cinelli in the winter of 06/07. The dates on my Flickr site are pretty good if you have greater interest in the other bikes. Although I could have taken updated pictures at a later date.
That's a fair number of interesting bikes for a 10 year span, especially considering the scarcity of many of them! Pretty fun!

I went through a bit of a buying spree starting in 1997, when I picked up my Olmo. It was around 2000 when I picked up my '74 Raleigh International and had a custom commuting/touring/travel frame built. In the few years after that, I picked up the Hetchins and Raleigh Team.

Pinched nerves in the neck kept me on recumbents from 2008 to around 2014, so that stopped the vintage acquisitions, not to mention that 2 recumbents ate up my spare space. Not sure if I'll find another vintage bike that I "need" to buy or not. The urges do come up, but I have a hard time buying another one when I'm pretty happy with what I've got. Something with a Cambio Corsa or Margherita would be hard to resist, though!

Steve in Peoria
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Old 01-14-18, 05:19 PM
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Did not know anything about it, but I had a feeling that this bike was special when the last owner posted up pics asking what it was all about, a few years ago on this forum....
One of the grand daddies of all CF race bikes..... It has to be saved for prosperity....
I ride it once in a while for short, careful rides around the neighborhood, just to keep things working on the bike and the tires inflated, but no more than that as it could be the last example left out there in mostly original condition......
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Old 01-15-18, 06:11 PM
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Random bikes

I ride all of them one at a time. 83 pug canyon express. 91 Fisher marlin. 97 specialized rock hopper on bontrager super stock wheels. Gt Lts with vector elite shock n magura race line brakes. 47 monark silver king leading linkage front end. 48 monark silver king regualar front with truss rods. 68 schwinn heavy duty with an s7 5 spd where set from a tandem and suburban shifter and rear derailer. 56 Columbia thunder bolt on bendex heavy duty wheels. 65 sears copper tone tote bike on bendex torpedo 3 spd. 1936 roll fast. US worksman industrial all pinstriped on double drum wheel. ? Year flying pigeon pa-06. 65 spaceliner deluxe. 36 Shelby flyer with shock eze. 46 Shelby flyer. 88 bridge stone mb-3. 83 lotus Prestige on rigada with Suntour Vx. ? Year tomasso Suntour criterion. 50 monark rocket rat rod and a schwinn phantom klunker that has been down cascade.
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Old 01-15-18, 08:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Chombi1 View Post

Did not know anything about it, but I had a feeling that this bike was special when the last owner posted up pics asking what it was all about, a few years ago on this forum....
One of the grand daddies of all CF race bikes..... It has to be saved for prosperity....
I ride it once in a while for short, careful rides around the neighborhood, just to keep things working on the bike and the tires inflated, but no more than that as it could be the last example left out there in mostly original condition......
Chombi1 ....

Just to let you know, there is still one more . Was givin to me a couple of months ago ... It is intact and functions, original ? Doubt it. But, it's Italian and carbon. '86 Record Carbonio. Washed it and coated it . Put it up for my '18 Fall/Winter project.
Regards, JD
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Old 01-15-18, 08:47 PM
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Originally Posted by jim dandy View Post
Chombi1 ....

Just to let you know, there is still one more . Was givin to me a couple of months ago ... It is intact and functions, original ? Doubt it. But, it's Italian and carbon. '86 Record Carbonio. Washed it and coated it . Put it up for my '18 Fall/Winter project.
Regards, JD
While the ALAN carbon is a very nice bike and I look forward to your build pictures it is quite a different bike from the Line Seeker.

The Line Seeker was, to my knowledge, the first production carbon bike. It had carbon wrapped around aluminum tubes and was all fitted together with stainless steel lugs. It was built by hand in exceptionally small numbers (less than 50?) and was the predecessor to the Exxon Graftek. A rare bird indeed.
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Old 01-15-18, 09:06 PM
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Originally Posted by obrentharris View Post
While the ALAN carbon is a very nice bike and I look forward to your build pictures it is quite a different bike from the Line Seeker.

The Line Seeker was, to my knowledge, the first production carbon bike. It had carbon wrapped around aluminum tubes and was all fitted together with stainless steel lugs. It was built by hand in exceptionally small numbers (less than 50?) and was the predecessor to the Exxon Graftek. A rare bird indeed.
Brent
Well,

I wanted an Italian bike and a Carbon bike. Don't have the cash for both ... this was as close as I'm going to get. Took it on one short ride ... nicknamed it the Flexible Flyer ...
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Old 01-16-18, 12:59 AM
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Originally Posted by jim dandy View Post
Chombi1 ....

Just to let you know, there is still one more . Was givin to me a couple of months ago ... It is intact and functions, original ? Doubt it. But, it's Italian and carbon. '86 Record Carbonio. Washed it and coated it . Put it up for my '18 Fall/Winter project.
Regards, JD
Speaking of 86 ALAN Record Carbonios.....

I got mine a few years ago as a close to new/mint frameset from one of our fellow C&V forum members.....
My first Italian made bike (#1 reason I got it), plus it is CF, which I could not get enough of, a few years ago, when I was also trying to find and own my ultimate dream bikes of my youth.....
I was actually one of those Alan Carbonios bought by Nishiki USA to re-brand as one of their own, so that they can join in on the CF movement that the bike industry was really starting to get into in the mid to late 80's. It is otherwise an Alan Carbonio, down to all its ALAN pantographing and serial numbers.
The Nishiki decals were long gone from the frame, except for a couple of small top tube decals, So it kinda became a mission to bring it back to its Italian identity with a complete ALAN decal set and a build sympathetic to its Euro roots, by using all Euro components (Edco, Mavic, Weinmann).
I alos realized that lot of my component stash that I was building up was an ideal match to the frame, so everythinng pointed to a "must have" for me when the frameset came up for sale in the forum.....
Unlike Jim, I find the Alan to be quite stiff. I frankly cannot make it flex at all, and it is the best handling bike I have in my stable, presently. Fast, quick turning and precise.....and light at only 18 pounds!
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Old 01-16-18, 08:51 AM
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for my C&V bikes, i bought most of them because they had some feature i was interested in.
That could be a certain technical detail, for example i bought bikes because they had an Osgear/a Cambio Corsa/a Superrecord ICS.


My Cinelli B or the Rabeneick Campagnolo, or the Alan just found me, i do have an ever-changing list of interesting bikes in my mind and when a good offer comes along that is roughly my size and in restorable condition and i happen to have the funds, i may get it.
Others, like a few of my Automotos and Girardengos, because i'm interested in the marque.


The only one i was really actively searching for was the Mike Appel.


PS: that car a few pages back on gomangos image is, indeed, a Fiat Dino Spyder. Georgeous car, but not exactly cheap to run nowadays (maybe a *bit* cheaper than a Ferrari, but not much)
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Old 01-16-18, 03:58 PM
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Chombi1, Obrentharris ...

Originally Posted by Chombi1 View Post
Speaking of 86 ALAN Record Carbonios.....

I got mine a few years ago as a close to new/mint frameset from one of our fellow C&V forum members.....
My first Italian made bike (#1 reason I got it), plus it is CF, which I could not get enough of, a few years ago, when I was also trying to find and own my ultimate dream bikes of my youth.....
I was actually one of those Alan Carbonios bought by Nishiki USA to re-brand as one of their own, so that they can join in on the CF movement that the bike industry was really starting to get into in the mid to late 80's. It is otherwise an Alan Carbonio, down to all its ALAN pantographing and serial numbers.
The Nishiki decals were long gone from the frame, except for a couple of small top tube decals, So it kinda became a mission to bring it back to its Italian identity with a complete ALAN decal set and a build sympathetic to its Euro roots, by using all Euro components (Edco, Mavic, Weinmann).
I alos realized that lot of my component stash that I was building up was an ideal match to the frame, so everythinng pointed to a "must have" for me when the frameset came up for sale in the forum.....
Unlike Jim, I find the Alan to be quite stiff. I frankly cannot make it flex at all, and it is the best handling bike I have in my stable, presently. Fast, quick turning and precise.....and light at only 18 pounds!
I received this bike as a gift from a slowly retiring older rider. As I begun researching, I realized this Alan was an early example of CF technology . I've learned more details from your collective posts than I expect I would have otherwise. The bike looks well used, but not abused. I have not taken the opportunity yet to closely inspect the frame integrity, so I'm holding off on buying restoration parts at this time. Also, I'm halfway thru a Peugeot rebuild at the moment. As I had mentioned to Obrentharris, I took the bike for a short ride before putting it up ... thus the Flexible Flyer moniker. Based upon Chombi1's observations, the "Flexible " part is probably due to my 205lb weight and needed headstem maintenance. It's a 57-58cm frame ,so fits me just right. The Alan seems noticeably lighter than my 19lb Caad8 . The drivetrain is a mix of Shimano, Suntour, and Campagnolo. So, if the frame passes inspection, I'll go with all Shimano with downtube indexing as a nod to the classics. I was pleased to see that an almost complete set (stb missing the Record decal) of decals from eBay. I'm going to use Chombi1's build as a benchmark as to how I want my Alan to turn out.

Thank you both for a short tour thru The Early Carbon Years.

Best Regards,
JD
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Old 01-16-18, 06:50 PM
  #118  
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Originally Posted by martl View Post

PS: that car a few pages back on gomangos image is, indeed, a Fiat Dino Spyder. Georgeous car, but not exactly cheap to run nowadays (maybe a *bit* cheaper than a Ferrari, but not much)
Again, thanks for the ID.

I've ridden in the car from time to time.

Fun stuff, but he has equally interesting cars.
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