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Why those particular bikes?

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Why those particular bikes?

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Old 01-04-18, 07:33 AM
  #1  
jimmuller 
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Why those particular bikes?

Share your motivations! Step back from your collections, cast your eye over their various ages, colors, history, technical details, riding characteristics, and ask yourself: What made you select the bikes you have now? What about the bike you seek next? Or that you acquire without seeking?

When I joined BF I owned just two bikes, my original 10-speed and the Gran Sport which had come to me as a cheap, abused bare frame begging to be made a bike again. Not brainer on that. The tandem was motivated by a desire to get my sweetie out on the road with me again.

The rest were more whimsical, opportunistic, all bare frames. The Bianchi was "I wanna' build a different kind of bike, that looks interesting and I know nothing about it." The Masi was a gift, another abused frame begging for redemption. Another no brainer.

The rest? The Motobecane was an opportunity to build a second uber-performance machine, which it turned out to be. The trashed Centurion frame was a spur-of-the-moment pickup from another BF member, motivated by the M.V. color scheme. The Gazelle was another whimsical bike, see it, imagine the possibilities, buy it, build it. The two Italians spoke to me as, well, Italians. (Accommodating the Tommasini's technical details has been interesting, might have been a show stopper if I'd thought about it more first.)

The Peugeot PFN10 appealed because it was funky and French. That it looked good and promised to ride well didn't hurt, but that FD mount? That sealed it.

So it appears that they have all been whimsical but with performance as a prerequisite. The whimsy says offbeat, out of the ordinary, not-your-every-day sort of thing.

Now a friend has pointed out a nearly new Masi Gran Criterium frame on ebay from their steel road bike collection. Minimal wear, very low price (for several reasons). Could be a great steel frame. Made from Reynolds 525. Okay. But I see a modern performance-oriented bike with ride characteristics much like a 531, and I ask myself whether it really appeals. Do I need it, or even care? If it didn't say "Masi" I probably wouldn't. Whimsy can be whimsical.
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Old 01-04-18, 08:11 AM
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My wife started doing triathlons last year. For her first one she rode my old Specialized mountain bike. She decided to continue in the sport so she bought a road bike. I did a bunch of training rides with her, me on the mountain bike and it got to the point that I decided to buy a road bike of my own. I knew it had to be steel like I used to ride so I started looking for the bike I wish I had bought when I was riding back in the 80’s.

It had to be an American made Schwinn, Trek or Specialized. I ended up with a Trek but soon found that one was not enough. Just to limit the field and collection I resolved to only buy Treks with the caveat that if a Paramount ever became available at a good price I would also be able to buy it!

So now I have my favorite bike which is a 1983 Trek 640 that came with a mix of original and updated parts, a 1985 560 Pro which is in original condition save the seat, and consumable items, and a 1978 730 with original equipment but with some rust issues that I am working on. I also have a 1985 600 frame on the way.

The 640 was a happy accident, I did not know how much I would like this bike. I put on a set of Velocity 700c wheels with 32mm tires and I am going to set it up with randonneur bars and bar end shifters. My goal this year is to ride a metric century and a full century on it this year.

The 560 pro is a fun bike to ride but I am thinking of selling or trading it off because I hate to modify it and the 730 has the same race type geometry along with the classic lug work that I prefer. I am cleaning up the 730 and will set it up for short fast training rides with my wife on our favorite 20 mile smoothlympaved trail.

The 600 will be my bad weather bike to ride on wet nasty days. I may even see if I can fit fenders along with 32mm tires on it.

I have been tempted by many other bikes with English and Italian heritage but so far I have resisted!

I am actively looking for another 1983 640 in a 21 or 22.5 inch frame size and open to any Trek that is pre cast seat lug construction that is a good buy.
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Old 01-04-18, 08:49 AM
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My collection of vintage is all Euro. (Ooops with the Carabela, 1 exception)
Different countries (OK I doubled up Italy).
I like original paint & decals (prior owner CyclArt'd EM).
Patina is revered (to some extent).
Keep them friction (OK one with Campy 9 - cause it was 'in-stock' in the garage).
Tubulars preferred.
And I like different colors.
Bigly Campagnolo fan.
Frames must have original fork.
Drop handlebars because......well, because????
No wall hangers.



An explanation of why each appealed to me when purchased would be too wordy to read.
It's simpler to say, I want to ride them all.
I need to get a pic of them all but this one will do for now.


edit:
I don't want a pickle - just wanna ride on my bi-cycle
And I don't want a tickle - just wanna ride on my bi-cycle
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Old 01-04-18, 09:19 AM
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Combination of what's available in my area that fits me fits me (#1 on the list) combined with what gets me excited, and what I can afford. I have so far not spent over $300 on anything, so that limits my choices quite a bit.

There are all kinds of bikes I would "like to own someday", but if there are none in my area for sale that I can afford, it's simply not gonna happen.

I think being in the right place at the right time is also a big factor, and something you really can't predict, so you always have to be ready with the cash in hand when you see a really good deal.
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Old 01-04-18, 09:24 AM
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Lately I've been attracted to variety. Every bicycle is an exercise in engineering compromises. I'm fascinated with how differently they all ride and perform. Some bikes go up hills or up rock gardens better. Some go down hills or rock gardens better. I plan to try them all.
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Old 01-04-18, 10:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Colnago Mixte View Post
Combination of what's available in my area that fits me fits me (#1 on the list) combined with what gets me excited, and what I can afford. I have so far not spent over $300 on anything, so that limits my choices quite a bit...I think being in the right place at the right time is also a big factor, and something you really can't predict, so you always have to be ready with the cash in hand when you see a really good deal.
I was going to write exactly this. I had a vague notion of higher-end 60's-80's road bikes from Italy, France, US, Japan, and as they showed up in my size for low $$, I got 'em. Not being too picky or rushed is the best way to get nicer bikes without busting the budget.
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Old 01-04-18, 10:19 AM
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UO-8: As a grad student, I worked at a Peugeot-Nishiki dealership. When my girlfriend -- now wife -- needed a bike, I bought it as a bare frame and custom-built it for her. Later, when fear of traffic drove her to mountain biking instead, I repurposed it as my commuter/shopper/beater. I still consider the UO-8 to be one of the better bargain basement "10 speeds."

KOM-10: After buying my elder son his first mountain bike, I decided I should get one, as well, to ride with him. A local firefighter was selling his "Team USA," made-in-America, red-white-and-blue Schwinn, so how could I resist? It still suits my rather non-technical, multi-track style well, despite the lack of suspension. It is also a blast to ride in 4th of July parades and in general on patriotic holidays.

Campione d'Italia: My first road bike was a bottom-of-the-line Bianchi, so I always had a soft spot for the marque. When my neighbor gave up narrow-tired road bikes in favor of a mountain bike, he gave it to me, so how could I resist? The metallic charcoal color is unusual and looks quite good, though I am sure a celeste one would be more valuable.

Modell Campagnolo: A college chum gave me a rough one, sans fork and various other parts, in 1972. I rode it until the frame broke, but always remembered the marque. When a neighbor was selling one with a dull red paint job for $20, I snatched it up. I have always been a sucker for the elaborate lugwork.

Sieger: This is the top of the Capo line. I found this one for sale while I was completing the restoration of the second Modell Campagnolo and decided to splurge, even though I did not really need another bike.

Bottom line: A lot of random drift and happenstance, more a matter of taking advantage of opportunities that arose than of any solid strategy or plan.
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Old 01-04-18, 10:30 AM
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My C&V, stuff was bought new many years ago.. (got Old) you focus on road bikes ...

I just have 1. RB1, parts transferred from an older AlAn that was in an accident. right hooked by a truck..





Now I use my Brompton a lot.. Fitted a Dynamo hub and wired LED lights .. Im now a home owner near small town center..









....

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Old 01-04-18, 10:34 AM
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My collection is limited to the area in which I once lived, that is framesets from -

Roberts (x3)
Geoffrey Butler (the Roberts built ones only x 2)
Allin (before 1981 x 2)
Bill Philbrook (born in the area, 1 only as they're super rare).

The above builders also happen to be three of the finest in England, and are very highly regarded here by connoisseurs of the (framebuilder's) art - I have also met these men.

I have other makes but the above are the most cherished.

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Old 01-04-18, 10:36 AM
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I have only 1 velo, an '84 Peugeot PH10. Bought it new to upgrade from my UO8 which I sold to a friend. I like its simplicity, the ride, and its good looks. I have zero plans to get a CF bike. I think they're just plain ugly.
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Old 01-04-18, 10:52 AM
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My various road, touring and mountain bikes were bought/built for the obvious reasons over the years. It's the 3-speeds that captured a place in my heart. Traded sample product back when I was repping for a used Raleigh Sports that I decided I needed to have for the flat ground and leisure time of my approaching retirement. Brought home the second one so I'd have a 23" stepthrough frame for the time when I'd be even older and unable to swing a leg over. Then the third a friend offered so I'd get it out of his yard. Then a fourth when a really cool Swiss 700C Condor showed up at the local co-op for cheap. Then a Raleigh Tourist that showed up at the same place for even cheaper. This might go on forever, or until my wife finds out.
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Old 01-04-18, 11:54 AM
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[QUOTE=Wildwood;20089447]My collection of vintage is all Euro. (Ooops with the Carabela, 1 exception)
Different countries (OK I doubled up Italy).
I like original paint & decals (one exception).
Patina is revered, to an extent.
Keep them friction (OK one with Campy 9 - cause it was 'in-stock' in the garage).
Tubulars preferred.
And I like different colors.
Bigly Campagnolo fan.
Frames must have original fork.
Drop handlebars cause......????
No wall hangers.



An explanation of why each appealed to me when purchased would be too wordy to read.
It's simpler to say, I want to ride them all.
I need to get a pic of them all but this one will do for now.


Wanting to ride them is a big part of my motivation as well!
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Old 01-04-18, 11:59 AM
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I have three vintage bikes, and they are all focused on budget tinkering so far. Many years ago, I bought a Univega Nuovo Sport in great shape, but I knew nothing about bike fit, so I bought the 51cm bike not knowing that my ideal size is 56cm. Never again.

My 72 Puch Bergmeister came to me for free, and while it was not the first vintage bike I acquired, it was the first one I focused on and completed.

My 72 Motobecane Grand Record was a frame only, and I took time to buy rider-quality original-spec(ish) parts that I could take apart and overhaul. More learning, more tinkering.

The 86 Univega Gran Premio was also a bare frame, and I bought it to transfer components from another inadvertently undersized Univega. The Suntour Blue Line drivetrain and the SR cranks, stem and bars came from a beautiful and underused Viva Touring, and I sold that frame.

Eventually, I will likely use the knowledge of bike fit and components to build a "new" bike with more thought, but I like that this approach keeps me busy on weekends and so far keeps the budget low.
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Old 01-04-18, 12:10 PM
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I was completely green about road bikes when I picked up my 1991 Eros in 2009. It was about two weeks before my first RAGBRAI and all of my cycling friends were telling me that I should get a road bike. (They turned out to be right.)

So I looked on Craigslist and found this in a nearby city. It fit well enough, and I was pressed for time so I would have to deal with the pink color. (I love it now.)


(See how clever I thought I was at the time? Who needs to buy fancy water bottles when I can just reuse a plastic Coke bottle and upend it in the bottle cage?)


It's been through a lot of component changes as I tweaked the fit and gearing over the years, now it fulfills its role pretty well.

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Old 01-04-18, 01:06 PM
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Most of mine were bought because they were cheap.

I need to re-think that collection strategy, as I've got more than I can ride; more than I want to wrench on. I'm cursed by ample storage space.
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Old 01-04-18, 01:17 PM
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I only ride pretty bikes.
I only ride bikes that fit me.
I only ride bikes that shift perfectly and are geared for the task at hand.

All of my bikes are pretty, shift perfectly, have appropriate gearing, and fit me.
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Old 01-04-18, 01:27 PM
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I have 4 vintage bikes, in my sig. They are mostly intentional purchases. Brief stories, in order of how long I've owned each:

1987 Mercian Professional: Purchased new in 1988 as a bare frame and fork to replace my Zeus Pro. I was passing through Colorado Springs on my honeymoon. At the time I was beginning to think I might enjoy a sports touring frame. Knowing that the Olympics training center was there I stopped into a big bike shop, maybe it was called World Cycle? There it was. As my ex-wife wrote in a diary we kept on that trip: "From across the room, their eyes met. He knew it was the One." It's a stiff criterium frame, the opposite of what I thought I wanted. But the lugwork and finish floored me. Currently in it's second major configuration, running an Ultegra group.

1966 Raleigh Sports: About 10 years ago I wanted a bike I could use for local errands and short rides that didn't require changing clothes for. I had a Rudge Sports as a kid and thought that would be just right. Found on Craigslist in the Metrowest suburbs of Boston, it was a bit of a barn find but it needed little more than a heavy cleaning and polishing. It's mostly original, and true to purpose it's my commuter, grocery getter and shorter fun rides around the city, particularly when my wife joins me on her '74 Sports.

1971 Peugeot PX-10: This is a very special bike, although I don't ride it now for various reasons. I've had it for about 5+ years, but my history with it goes back to 1972. I learned how to ride and wrench in a class setting in high school when I was 15. This was my teacher's bike and it was became of my grail bikes, as it is for many. Over 26 years my teacher logged over 87k miles on it. I hadn't seen him since 1975, but I got back in touch with him in 2011 to thank him for giving me the gift of cycling. Not long after he asked me if I would take his Peugeot, since he hadn't ridden it for many years and he wanted someone (me) to take care of it.

1971 Raleigh International: My other grail was the Raleigh Pro Mk. IV. Blue Mink. A little while back I saw a Pro frameset hanging in my LBS and checked it out. It needed refinishing, and as I considered the work involved a funny thing happened. The 'grailness' kind of vanished. It had no more mojo for me than any other good quality 531 frame and I realized that it wasn't going to be much different than my Mercian, which I love. I was telling Tom @noglider about this, and he suggested looking at an International. Having just finished his epic build he was very keen on it's qualities, and he kept forwarding me links when they came up on the 'bay. I scored a frame and fork in November of '16. I had most of what I needed to do a build that's very close to the original spec. It's perfect for longer riding around the city with it's long wheelbase, stays and comfortable geometry. So the sports touring frame I thought I was getting 30 years ago has come to pass.
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Old 01-04-18, 01:31 PM
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I like the left field, off-beat, cheap stuff. Great way to rack up a nice collection of interesting bikes quite quickly.
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Old 01-04-18, 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by rccardr View Post
I only ride pretty bikes.
I only ride bikes that fit me.
I only ride bikes that shift perfectly and are geared for the task at hand.

All of my bikes are pretty, shift perfectly, have appropriate gearing, and fit me.
Doc - we are so different - i love your bikes.

Same for @SquidPuppet and several others too numerous to name.


edit: ....just for clarity, i love mine more - but i love to look at the the perfection/precision of yours.
And totally agree on gearing = for me it's 'old man gearing'. 46/30 or 48/34 or triples abound, with 28 out back.

And Squid's are so creative.
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Old 01-04-18, 01:52 PM
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Easy to answer, the Medici Pro Strada was a gift from a really good friend here (my gateway drug so to say,) it fulfilled all my initial C&V needs. Once built it had the Campagnolo group, and the wheel set/tubular tires, that I always had wanted and had enjoyed at one time.

The Tommasini Prestige was an opportunity for an Italian lugged frame-set that I could build up in much the same fashion as the Medici, but with SR components where required. They have two distinct personalities and rides, even though they are both Columbus SL tube sets, brazed lug construction and somewhat similar geometry.

Third bike is my CAAD 10 Ultegra, nothing special, but it got me back on bikes and is never leaving my greasy hands, nor are either of my C&V bikes. Point of pride.

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Old 01-04-18, 02:01 PM
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I got into road bikes thru my brother in law who had(has) half a garage full of older road and mtbs to refurbish. I liked a pink Zebra bike he had hanging(post Zebrakenko) and became obsessed with lugs and the history side of road bike technology and company history.
The history aspect(manufacturing, advancements, globalization, growth and decline of brands, etc) is fascinating and what keeps me interested in older road bikes.


As for my current stable of C&V…

87 Miyata 912 – my first road bike. Got it because it fit, I thought the Miyata Splined Tubing was neat, and it was an OKish price. It helped solidify my love for the entire Japanese history in cycling.

’80 Schwinn Voyageur 11.8 – got it because it fit and I wanted to do a full rebuild switching it over to a SunTour drivetrain that could handle loaded touring.

’87 Schwinn Prelude – got it because it fit and I wanted an inexpensive winter project. Came as a frameset and I used a donor bike plus my parts bin to build it.

’90 Fuji touring bike – got it as a frame because it fit and I wanted a more capable touring bike.

’93 Mongoose IBOC Comp SX – got it as a NOS frame from the local bike collective. Wanted to build up an MTB to do more singletrack when I didn’t feel like riding roads or gravel. Geometry is a bit wonky compared to current since its such an old frame, but it gets me out into the woods.
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Old 01-04-18, 02:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Wildwood View Post
Doc - we are so different - i love your bikes.

Same for @SquidPuppet and several others too numerous to name.


edit: ....just for clarity, i love mine more - but i love to look at the the perfection/precision of yours.
And totally agree on gearing = for me it's 'old man gearing'. 46/30 or 48/34 or triples abound, with 28 out back.

And Squid's are so creative.
Thanks for the compliment.


Why do I choose a particular bike? Well, I require the latest and highest technology. My bikes must be extremely light weight. If it costs me $732.27 to save 8 grams, I'm all over that. Cost be damned. Aero dynamics and powerful brakes are also critical because I am usually crushing extreme speeds. Comfort does not matter. Speed, speed, more speed, and huge flashy graphics and logos are my cup of tea.








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Old 01-04-18, 02:40 PM
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All the bikes I own fit me. Most are ridden (except for one). Most are mtb's because that's what I've ridden for decades. All were either free or less than $50 so yeah, I try to look for bargains.
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Old 01-04-18, 03:21 PM
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Wow... this thread made me realize I have NEVER bought myself a bike. So why are there so many around me?
My current fav is a Miyata 310 that I found on clearance at a Pawn1 store. A family member paid $25 and said Merry Christmas early. All the rest have been given to me.
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Old 01-04-18, 03:53 PM
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Originally Posted by SquidPuppet View Post
Well, I require the latest and highest technology. My bikes must be extremely light weight.
Nice. That's the first RD made from nonexistium that I've ever seen. Or rather, that I've never seen. No wonder it is so light. Probly shifts like buttah too, dozennit?
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