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Old 01-11-18, 12:45 PM   #26
AJBK
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If you're new to this, some of the more valuable "upgrades" to an older bike may not be obvious; many may consider some of these are necessary:

- Overhaul bottom bracket, wheel hubs, headset, pedals. Clean, adjust, new grease
- Adjust seat height/angle/horizontal; adjust handlebar height, brake lever position. Change seat, handlebar, seat post, stem if any of these components would improve fit
- New brake pads, cables, housing. Make any adjustments necessary
- True wheels and check for correct spoke tension
- New tires, new rim tape
- If it's old/worn, get a new chain
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Old 01-11-18, 12:47 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phtomita View Post
I just got a 1985 (per serial number, but 1986 from some thread I read here) Nishiki Tri-A that has pretty much all original - will post photos on other thread - and originally was thinking on rebuilding it for the nice frame.
Bike is very nice and I like it - but but ....
Ride it. Try to identify its shortcomings, and try to distinguish the bike's shortcomings from your unfamiliarity with it.

If your feet hurt after a hundred mile ride, and you decide pedals with cages and straps don't agree with your shoes, change the pedals. That's an easy fix and a lot of riders consider it a bare minimum upgrade. Same with the saddle: if it doesn't work out for you, change it. And dial in the fit; you may need a longer or shorter stem, for example.

On the other hand, if you don't like the downtube shifters, I'd give that a few hundred miles at a minimum. Get used to down tube shifting before making any rash decisions. Switching to integrated shifters is expensive and, in my opinion, is not an upgrade anyway.
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Old 01-11-18, 01:05 PM   #28
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N+1, buy an additional new bike ..
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Old 01-11-18, 08:49 PM   #29
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Uploaded some photos here
https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...shiki-tri.html
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Old 01-11-18, 10:31 PM   #30
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Looks good to me. I still think pedals plus tires, tape, consumables is all you need.


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On the other hand, if you don't like the downtube shifters, I'd give that a few hundred miles at a minimum. Get used to down tube shifting before making any rash decisions. Switching to integrated shifters is expensive and, in my opinion, is not an upgrade anyway.
I tend to miss this, having been raised on DT shifters. When people say "upgrade", it appears that oftentimes all they want is modern shifters/brifters that they feel comfortable with. If that's the case, yeah, I'd agree with the above advice. Give the DT shifters a chance for a time. You will likely get comfortable with them. If you really don't like them, then consider swapping in brifters. Anyway, no reason not to ride it as is to get an idea of the bike before throwing money at it.

Given this bike is 600 equipped as is, meaning nice 'groupset' already. Most likely by upgrade we are talking cross grade at most. If you have a box full of modern parts fine, but to refit the bike from scratch you'd be looking at an ultegra group, set of wheels, and a frame realignment. I figure that cost at least $1200+ if bought new from online retailers, not including labor.
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Old 01-12-18, 03:45 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by phtomita View Post
Now that I see the photos, I haven't changed my mind. Nice bike if it fits. If you are riding clipless pedals on your Tommasso, put those pedals on the Nishiki and ride it as is.
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Old 01-12-18, 04:33 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by fender1 View Post
What most people do here (myself included) is spend as much as possible on "upgrades" of "period correct" or "modern" components, take lots of pictures, post about how it is the only bike you will ever want/need to justify the expenditure, ride it less than 100 miles total and then decide you want a different bike.

Next, try to sell the current bike (at not too much of a loss) to "raise cash" for a "new, grail bike" that just came up for sale and that you have NEVER seen for sale previously.....conveniently forget you were not LOOKING previously, but I digress..

Wash, rinse and repeat until you realize you can only ride one at a time and that you will always be in the "hole" and that y ou are looking for the next bike/upgrade because that is a large part of the fun.

Physical exercise is generally less enjoyable than buying stuff and talking about it on the internet.
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Old 01-12-18, 07:53 PM   #33
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That is a really nice looking bike with good components. I'd get it all serviced and then ride it for a few hundred before deciding if you need to upgrade anything. Of course you do want to dial it in first to fit you.
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Old 01-12-18, 07:57 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fender1 View Post
What most people do here (myself included) is spend as much as possible on "upgrades" of "period correct" or "modern" components, take lots of pictures, post about how it is the only bike you will ever want/need to justify the expenditure, ride it less than 100 miles total and then decide you want a different bike.

Next, try to sell the current bike (at not too much of a loss) to "raise cash" for a "new, grail bike" that just came up for sale and that you have NEVER seen for sale previously.....conveniently forget you were not LOOKING previously, but I digress..

Wash, rinse and repeat until you realize you can only ride one at a time and that you will always be in the "hole" and that you are looking for the next bike/upgrade because that is a large part of the fun.

Physical exercise is generally less enjoyable than buying stuff and talking about it on the internet.
Sell for the next "grail" ??!!

Dang it, if I had realized that's how you do it I wouldn't have this issue!



Seriously though, riding is so much more fun than buying and talking about them. Riding a different one each day makes it ever better!
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Old 01-13-18, 09:01 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by jamesdak View Post
Sell for the next "grail" ??!!

Dang it, if I had realized that's how you do it I wouldn't have this issue!



Seriously though, riding is so much more fun than buying and talking about them. Riding a different one each day makes it ever better!
Yeah riding is the best part. I was being a smart alec and reminding myself not to buy another bike.... hey,where did that used Rivendell Custom come from in my basement? Uh-oh, here we go again!
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Old 01-13-18, 10:13 AM   #36
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Your Tri-A is a decent bike, but the paint scheme is pretty boring and Nishiki is generally not a collectable brand that will appreciate in value, too many low end bikes and never a market leader/innovator.

Upgrade as your heart and mind desire, keep your original parts in a box in case you wish to switch the new parts to a newer acquisition.
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Old 01-13-18, 05:06 PM   #37
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I'm in the camp that says do what makes you happy. I would rather have a bike that is comfortable and has gearing for the terrain I ride, than one that is 100% original.

I bought my Miyata 310 in 1984 and for 27 years, it was my only road bike. In 2011 I decided to try a modern bike and bought a Jamis Quest. Since I'm not 23, the Miyata didn't fit so well anymore, but it was really apparent when I got the new bike. I didn't want to let go of the Miyata, so I set about making it something I would be happy to ride all day. I had already built a set of wheels with hooked beads so I could run better tires. I bought a taller stem and wider bars, and a Brooks saddle. I also switched to SPD pedals and shoes. It is still the same bike, but a whole lot nicer to ride.

Ironically, the only thing I've changed on the Jamis is the Brooks saddle. Everything else is just right.
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Old 01-14-18, 08:14 AM   #38
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What sloar said. What do you need the bike to do?

Answer that, and your decision is made.

That will be 3.50, and I'll send Shawn his cut....
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Old 01-14-18, 10:44 AM   #39
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From a purist standpoint, never upgrade the bike.

But, I'm not a purist. I have owned my 1985 Peugeot PGN10 since the day I rolled it out of the showroom at age 17, and it has undergone a few changes. First was a set of carbon/aluminum handlebars with new SRAM brakes. Then, a new carbon fiber fork. Then, an drivetrain/wheelset upgrade from helicomatic wheels (you can hear that "ping" sound of spokes snapping) to FSA Omega compact cranks, Mavic CXP22 wheelset, and an 8 speed cassette.

And this winter, a whole new drivetrain overhaul. Microshift Arsis 10 speed carbon groupset, new Microshift Centos 10 speed cassette, KMC 10 speed chain, and possibly a new Shimano cranket

And there's the other bike, an beat up old 1985 Peugeot P8 my dad picked up for me at a thrift store last year. The original components were far too rusted for use. So, this becomes the recipient of hand-me-down parts from the PGN10.

I like to look of old classics, but with new hoods, carbon fiber replacements, etc, the just are more comfortable than the older OEM equipment.

Last edited by friday1970; 01-14-18 at 10:55 AM.
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