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Shipping

Old 03-07-18, 02:21 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by gugie
Did someone say pix or it didn't happen?

Is that a Cinelli?
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Old 03-07-18, 02:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K
Is that a Cinelli?
Guginelli, he's a cousin.
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Old 03-07-18, 02:46 PM
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Originally Posted by gugie
Guginelli, he's a cousin.
I see. It looks just like the bike you packed for me to ship to Spaghetti Legs.
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Old 03-07-18, 04:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K
I see. It looks just like the bike you packed for me to ship to Spaghetti Legs.
They all do when they've gotten the Mummificazione treatment. I can see that this one has a front rack attached to the fork under the chrysalis, which would be blasphemy on a Cinelli.

I should know, I was run out of a small village in Northern Italy once for attempting the very same thing...
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Old 03-07-18, 07:13 PM
  #30  
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I have no doubts I overpack as Jim mentioned. I have tried to simplify my packing to save time as it takes me too long. The foam insulation I use is probably overkill too.

One thing I do is add cardboard bracing around the headtube, bottom bracket shell and around the seat tube where the seat post would be inserted. That along with the rear drop outs becomes the four points of contact. Iíve stopped using packing in the box as itís not needed.

Half my time goes into box cutting. The less I have to do, the quicker the pack. Sometimes I wonder if itís just better to let the box go a little bigger and pay the extra. Fitting a 25 inch frameset in a 108 inch box is a challenge!

I do struggle on placement of the front wheel and handlebars. Itís pretty crowded and you donít want the handlebars striking the frame.
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Old 03-07-18, 08:11 PM
  #31  
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I haven't shipped a bike in over 30 years. When I did (several cross-country shipments), I wrapped all the frame tubes and detached parts with cardboard wrapped with packing tape. The rear wheel stayed attached, and the RD, front wheel, and handlebars were tucked in as I could make them fit. I don't remember what I used to block the front dropouts, but I'm sure I used something. I made sure it didn't jiggle in the box. I have every confidence that what I thought was a good pack job then would be met with horror now, but I was pretty thorough and nothing was ever damaged.

(Quick aside - My 1967 Paramount frame, fork and headset came to me in a bike box. And nothing else. The seller literally dropped the F/F/H into a bike box, taped up the box, and sent it on its way. Amazingly enough, it came through unscathed and it is now my commuter. If it had been damaged, the seller and I would have had words.)

I shipped via Greyhound. I have no idea if that option s still available, but it was cheap and it worked well. Yeah, I had to drop it off and pick it up at a Greyhound station, and they weren't exact;y Speedy Gonzales, but every place I needed to ship from or pick up at had one. And my experience was that the baggage handlers for Greyhound (most often than not the actual driver of the actual bus it traveled on) were far less nasty with baggage than airline baggage handlers. (Plus, the distance falling off the baggage compartment of a Greyhound bud is a lot shorter than the distance fallingfrom the height of an airliner's baggage compartment.) In any event, it worked.
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Old 03-07-18, 10:10 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by bikingshearer

(Quick aside - My 1967 Paramount frame, fork and headset came to me in a bike box. And nothing else. The seller literally dropped the F/F/H into a bike box, taped up the box, and sent it on its way. Amazingly enough, it came through unscathed and it is now my commuter. If it had been damaged, the seller and I would have had words.)

.

I had a similar experience, ebay seller used a bike box, took off the handlebars and just tossed it in. No packing, no nothing. Sadly he also tossed in the loose handlebars right on top of it. So it rattled all the way across the country, from Seattle to NC. The loose handlebars inside the box did a lot of damage. When I contacted the seller, he was shocked "I used a bicycle box!!"

But there has to be a point somewhere between my packing methods now and loose in a box, that actually works. I need to stop in at the local bike shop.
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Old 03-08-18, 02:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K
I have shipped a bike using Amtrak. I shipped a touring bike from the Portland, OR Amtrak station to the Pittsburgh Amtrak station then about a year later I shipped the same bike in reverse. It cost me about $110 each way, including the cost of the box. I'm pretty sure the cost depends on how far it's going. Portland charged me for the box and I got a brand new one. In Pittsburgh they gave me a used one at no cost.

The "packing" method is not for the feint of heart. You literally just take off the handlebar and hang them on the top tube. The standard Amtrak box is big enough for the bike to roll in with wheels attached, and that's actually what Amtrak intends for you to do. I was shipping a Surly, so that was fine for me. I suppose you could be more careful if you so chose. The fact that they expect it in this condition tells you a little something about how they handle it, I hope.

Down sides? You can't ship from just any station. It has to be a station that handles checked baggage and it has to be going to a station that handles checked baggage. Also, they offer no promises as to delivery time. It goes on the next train that has room. That might be today, it might be next week. Mostly, I suspect, it's today. Coast-to-coast my delivery took about three days. I shipped early and the bike got to Pittsburgh before I did. Return shipping was about the same, as I recall.
That is cool! I should ship a zero bike down there to keep at one of you guys' place. It would be an added incentive to making the road-trip down there more often than I do currently. Of course, the train is another option for getting me there, too

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Old 03-08-18, 03:58 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by Drillium Dude
That is cool! I should ship a zero bike down there to keep at one of you guys' place. It would be an added incentive to making the road-trip down there more often than I do currently. Of course, the train is another option for getting me there, too
Riding Amtrak from Seattle to Portland or vice versa is very cool (assuming the train stays on the tracks). For something like an extra $5 you can reserve a spot for your bike then you just wheel it up to the baggage car, fully assembled, and watch as an attendant hangs it on a hook such as you might have in your garage. When you get to your destination, the attendant grabs your bike and hands it to you and you ride off.

That even works at the "primitive" stations like Tukwilla. And by "primitive" I mean this:



I think they've upgraded this one a bit since the above picture was taken, but I used it for bike travel when it looked like that.

BTW, if you want to make your naked Colnago a zero bike I'd be more than happy to keep it in my garage.
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Old 03-08-18, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K
I see. It looks just like the bike you packed for me to ship to Spaghetti Legs.
Yeah it took me like 20 minutes to unpack it. I was making little whimpering noises the whole time.
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Old 03-08-18, 04:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K
Riding Amtrak from Seattle to Portland or vice versa is very cool (assuming the train stays on the tracks). For something like an extra $5 you can reserve a spot for your bike then you just wheel it up to the baggage car, fully assembled, and watch as an attendant hangs it on a hook such as you might have in your garage. When you get to your destination, the attendant grabs your bike and hands it to you and you ride off.

That even works at the "primitive" stations like Tukwilla. And by "primitive" I mean this:



I think they've upgraded this one a bit since the above picture was taken, but I used it for bike travel when it looked like that.

BTW, if you want to make your naked Colnago a zero bike I'd be more than happy to keep it in my garage.
You know, I might look into this as more than just an option. Edmonds is the closest station to me. I'd get there faster than by car, but I'd need to figure the getting to the hotel part. I don't have any touring setups and am not acquiring one anytime soon.

I might bring a naked bike, but not the Colnago; the bike I'd bring would be for riding and the Colnago is much too small for me to ride.

DD
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Old 03-09-18, 02:52 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by Drillium Dude
You know, I might look into this as more than just an option. Edmonds is the closest station to me. I'd get there faster than by car, but I'd need to figure the getting to the hotel part. I don't have any touring setups and am not acquiring one anytime soon.

I might bring a naked bike, but not the Colnago; the bike I'd bring would be for riding and the Colnago is much too small for me to ride.

DD
I would hand your naked Colnago over to someone else over my cold, dead body.

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Old 11-04-21, 03:23 AM
  #38  
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Gugie worked on my Witcomb, it took more that 20 minutes to unpack it.
It will be something that I will copy when ever I ship a bike.
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