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Sugino Mighty Competition chainring

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Sugino Mighty Competition chainring

Old 03-24-18, 07:19 PM
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Sugino Mighty Competition chainring

Hi,

So I just purchased on the eBay a 144bcd sugino mighty competition or possibly super mighty competition ďtrackĒ chainring.

I believe it is 1/8Ē because the back is smooth without a ridge. Can anyone confirm how to tell from a picture whether I bought a 1/8 or 3/32?

Also I am wondering what the quality and type of aluminum used of these rings are as compared to modern sugino rings as well as the campy pista rings of that time. How were chainrings machined in the 80ís compared to modern cnc techniques?

Obviously Iíll have more answers when I get this in hand but I thought I would throw it out to you folks.

Here is a link to an example of what I believe I bought. https://www.njs-export.com/collectio...g-50t-17011414
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Old 03-24-18, 08:50 PM
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In cases like that, I ask the seller before bidding.
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Old 03-24-18, 08:53 PM
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Originally Posted by ufbeans View Post
Hi,

So I just purchased on the eBay a 144bcd sugino mighty competition or possibly super mighty competition ďtrackĒ chainring.

I believe it is 1/8Ē because the back is smooth without a ridge. Can anyone confirm how to tell from a picture whether I bought a 1/8 or 3/32?

Also I am wondering what the quality and type of aluminum used of these rings are as compared to modern sugino rings as well as the campy pista rings of that time. How were chainrings machined in the 80ís compared to modern cnc techniques?

Obviously Iíll have more answers when I get this in hand but I thought I would throw it out to you folks.

Here is a link to an example of what I believe I bought. https://www.njs-export.com/collectio...g-50t-17011414
I'll have to go measure one of my Mighty Competition rings, but generally, if your suspect ring measures more than 3/32" thick, then you've got a track chainring.

As for the aluminum used, I think most of the Sugino Rings were Duralumin (2014 alloy), with maybe their better rings being Super Duralumin (2024 alloy). I know Dura Ace came out with "Extra Super Duralumin" (7075 alloy) as an optional "racing" set of chainrings for the 7100 or 7200 era. Back in the day, Campagnolo used 7075 for all their rings, and were generally thought to be much more durable (and more $$$$$). Most quality modern rings are either 2024, or 7075 for the better ones. (Many cheaper modern rings are made from 6061 -- much easier to machine, but much less durable.)
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Old 03-24-18, 09:03 PM
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Campagnolo was the brand that added material to the back side of the ring, a carry over from the block chain era.
Maybe at some point the Japanese copied them, but not in the 70's.
And you paid Dearly for Campagnolo, of any chain type or BCD configuration.
I had ONE Campagnolo ring, all my other track rings were Sugino.

Campagnolo pista chainring bolts were superior, the back side element had a knurled perimeter that dug into the crank, making changing rings a breeze.
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Old 03-24-18, 09:32 PM
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Originally Posted by cdmurphy View Post
I'll have to go measure one of my Mighty Competition rings, but generally, if your suspect ring measures more than 3/32" thick, then you've got a track chainring.

As for the aluminum used, I think most of the Sugino Rings were Duralumin (2014 alloy), with maybe their better rings being Super Duralumin (2024 alloy). I know Dura Ace came out with "Extra Super Duralumin" (7075 alloy) as an optional "racing" set of chainrings for the 7100 or 7200 era. Back in the day, Campagnolo used 7075 for all their rings, and were generally thought to be much more durable (and more $$$$$). Most quality modern rings are either 2024, or 7075 for the better ones. (Many cheaper modern rings are made from 6061 -- much easier to machine, but much less durable.)
Thanks for that. Iíve read anecdotally that the sugino cranks and rings rivaled the campy ones although they are clearly copies. If the 7100 era campy stuff was 7075 perhaps the sugino version is as well. For track and fixed gear stuff you really donít see too much 2024 alloy any more although this guy https://www.cycleunderground.com.au/ makes a bunch of reproductions of that ere rings using the stuff. He says it work hardens through use.
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Old 03-24-18, 09:59 PM
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Originally Posted by ufbeans View Post
Thanks for that. Iíve read anecdotally that the sugino cranks and rings rivaled the campy ones although they are clearly copies. If the 7100 era campy stuff was 7075 perhaps the sugino version is as well. For track and fixed gear stuff you really donít see too much 2024 alloy any more although this guy https://www.cycleunderground.com.au/ makes a bunch of reproductions of that ere rings using the stuff. He says it work hardens through use.
I alternate between a 42 Sugino and a 43 Campy on my road fix gear. Both 1/8". On a Sugino 75 crank. Except the gear ratio and the fact that the Campy is their years ago BMX blue, I cannot tell the difference. Now, that is a modern Sugino ring. I raced a road Sugino crankset in the 70s and mixed Campy and Sugino rings and except for appearance, never felt any difference. So on all the 144 cranksets I have used, I felt Sugino vs Campy was just a toss. Who had the rings with the teeth I needed? My wallet always hoped the Campys lasted longer. I never noticed enough difference to matter.

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Old 03-24-18, 10:37 PM
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Originally Posted by ufbeans View Post
...I believe it is 1/8” because the back is smooth without a ridge. Can anyone confirm how to tell from a picture whether I bought a 1/8 or 3/32?...

Any ROAD ring from the 60's through the 90's will have teeth about 2mm or .08" thick at the very base of the teeth.
Track rings have much thicker teeth, about 3mm thick or .12"
I think you would know by looking if it looks very much thicker, and a road chain won't fit on track chainring teeth.
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Old 03-24-18, 10:41 PM
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
Any ROAD ring from the 60's through the 90's will have teeth about 2mm or .08" thick at the very base of the teeth.
Track rings have much thicker teeth, about 3mm thick or .12"
I think you would know by looking if it looks very much thicker, and a road chain won't fit on track chainring teeth.
What do you make of this?
Attached Images
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Old 03-25-18, 01:03 AM
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Those teeth look mighty thick. So, I'd guess 1/8" chain.

I think NJS Exports specializes in track bikes and components, so I'd anticipate their rings to be track rings unless otherwise specified.

Unfortunately I don't have my Sugino Mighty Comp ring here otherwise I'd take photos. Mine is just a little more worn than that one.
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Old 03-25-18, 01:18 AM
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IMHO The "Mighty" Sugino Mighty Competition crank, rings et all have/had no rivals, copy or not. Equals maybe but easily one of the best if not the best in the business.


Originally Posted by ufbeans View Post
Thanks for that. Iíve read anecdotally that the sugino cranks and rings rivaled the campy ones although they are clearly copies. If the 7100 era campy stuff was 7075 perhaps the sugino version is as well. For track and fixed gear stuff you really donít see too much 2024 alloy any more although this guy https://www.cycleunderground.com.au/ makes a bunch of reproductions of that ere rings using the stuff. He says it work hardens through use.
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Old 03-25-18, 04:22 PM
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Sugino

And they are more available

Originally Posted by merziac View Post
IMHO The "Mighty" Sugino Mighty Competition crank, rings et all have/had no rivals, copy or not. Equals maybe but easily one of the best if not the best in the business.
/
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Old 03-25-18, 04:33 PM
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Yep, that too.

Don't get me wrong, I definitely love me some Campy too, tradition, period correct, heritage, provenance and all that but side by side crank for crank Sugino is tough to beat for me.

Originally Posted by kc0yef View Post
And they are more available


/
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Old 03-25-18, 04:38 PM
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Originally Posted by merziac View Post
IMHO The "Mighty" Sugino Mighty Competition crank, rings et all have/had no rivals, copy or not. Equals maybe but easily one of the best if not the best in the business.
You wouldn't be saying that if you had snapped a Sugino Mighty Competition crank across the pedal eye during an out-of-saddle climb. (Been there ... done that ... not fun.)

In Sugino's defense, I note that this was a 1970 or 1971 model and that even slightly more recent versions added more material around the pedal eye, making me suspect I was not alone in experiencing the failure.
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Old 03-25-18, 04:57 PM
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You could be right, never been that hard on them myself.

However it's not like a Campy never snapped either.

Some have also speculated that over and under tightened pedals, minor crossthreading and threading issues in general can contribute as well.

That being said we would hope all of them could withstand a fair amount of nonsense and most seem to have done just that which of course is a good thing for us.

Originally Posted by John E View Post
You wouldn't be saying that if you had snapped a Sugino Mighty Competition crank across the pedal eye during an out-of-saddle climb. (Been there ... done that ... not fun.)

In Sugino's defense, I note that this was a 1970 or 1971 model and that even slightly more recent versions added more material around the pedal eye, making me suspect I was not alone in experiencing the failure.
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Old 03-25-18, 05:22 PM
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Well lets see some pics
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Old 03-25-18, 05:52 PM
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Originally Posted by John E View Post
You wouldn't be saying that if you had snapped a Sugino Mighty Competition crank across the pedal eye during an out-of-saddle climb. (Been there ... done that ... not fun.)

In Sugino's defense, I note that this was a 1970 or 1971 model and that even slightly more recent versions added more material around the pedal eye, making me suspect I was not alone in experiencing the failure.
"In Sugino's defense," I twice had to thread the needle in races to get past the wheel I was on when his Campy crank did exactly that. Once between the rider's bike and the outside curb coming out of a corner in a criterium, Don't ask me how I pulled it off. (1977 and 1978) Those were probably old, tired cranks but I did not seek out the riders and inquire. My first Sugino crank was ~1975. Never broke one. (Knock on wood.) If you rid a conventional aluminum crank long enough, it WILL break, probably through the threads or the square taper hole. Stress starters.

My only crank failure to date was a well ridden Avocet that i had on a new setup until I found the right ones. Lucked out. Happened just before the top of a small rise as I came out of the saddle. I just stepped on the road, sat down, stopped, then clomped around looking for the pedal until I realized it was still strapped to my foot. My luck didn't stop there. It was all downhill from there to a meeting with friends, one of whom had his pickup. Decided right there the bike was a keeper. (One of those that looks out for its owner.)

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