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Adjusting a saddle with a vintage 2 bolt Campy seatpost

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Adjusting a saddle with a vintage 2 bolt Campy seatpost

Old 04-01-18, 07:22 PM
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Adjusting a saddle with a vintage 2 bolt Campy seatpost

Hey all,
On the two bolt design, is the front bolt for tilt and the back bolt for moving the saddle on the rails?
Or do you need to loosen both bolts? I don't have the angled 10mm
wrench, so I don't want to have to deal with both bolts unless I have to 😊
Thanks much,
Rich
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Old 04-01-18, 07:25 PM
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You'll need to deal with both bolts to tilt the saddle. Loosen one, and tighten the other to tilt the saddle. Which one you loosen depends on which way you want the saddle to tilt.
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Old 04-01-18, 07:27 PM
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Lots of info doing a simple Google search using your title as the search terms.
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Old 04-01-18, 07:33 PM
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One of these in 10mm.

Attachment 605599

Last edited by Wileyone; 09-05-18 at 06:21 PM.
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Old 04-01-18, 07:35 PM
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Old 04-01-18, 07:38 PM
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I use a plain 10 mm box wrench. Its a pain but if you turn flip turn flip turn flip..... it works.
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Old 04-01-18, 07:39 PM
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I did a google search and found lots of things but nothing that directly related to the two bolts doing different things. If I just want to move the saddle back on the rails, do I still need to loosen both bolts?
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Old 04-01-18, 07:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Wileyone View Post
One of these in 10mm.

Attachment 605599
Danke!
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Old 04-01-18, 07:44 PM
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I bought a cheap 10mm wrench from China, put it in the vice and put a slight z bend in it, works great...
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Old 04-01-18, 08:24 PM
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Originally Posted by FrejusFlyer View Post
I did a google search and found lots of things but nothing that directly related to the two bolts doing different things. If I just want to move the saddle back on the rails, do I still need to loosen both bolts?
You might get away with it by loosening only one bolt...there's only one way to find out.
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Old 04-01-18, 09:19 PM
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Anyone who worked for a Raleigh dealer in the 70's and assembled internationals and pros will have strong opinions on how to adjust.
The two bolts work in opposition on tilt. Loosening the assembly allows fore/ aft movement.
In general, approximate the tilt at the forward bolt while things are easy to modify as everything is loose and cinch down the rear slowly, tap the saddle to setback and finish tightening the rear, the "new" open end ratchet box wrenches with the hinge are nifty to speed things along.
If you guessed correctly at the front all will fall into place, guess wrong and I usually loosen the rear - modify the front and then tighten up the rear bolt where is is easier to access. I did not like the design way back but had to admit that when set, things Stayed in place, reliable.
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Old 04-01-18, 11:07 PM
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There is a craftsman box end 10/11 mm. Plenty long to reach both bolts from the back side of the saddle.
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Old 04-01-18, 11:19 PM
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I do the same thing on all the two bolt posts. Say I want the nose down a touch. I back of the rear bolt a bunch, then tighten the front say 1/4 turn, making a good note off that 1/4. Then I tighten the bolt back down. With this approach, I can for example go exactly back to where I started or exactly half way between.

A huge fan of 2 bolt posts. Yes, the old Campys and copies had their challenges wrench-wise, but they had the ability to get the most critical adjustment on the bike perfect. And (big, big plus if you raced or for any other reason, you HAD to ride), if you got a saddle sore, you could tilt the seat forward or back a half turn (say), ride that miserable position for the next two weeks until the sore was gone, then get the seat back to perfect in one move. No trial and error. No risk of riding that very long, hard race with a seat that wasn't quite right.

Edit: as miserable as those seatposts were to get "normal" wrenches on, they were far better than the one bolt posts of the early '80s. My good post left me when I sold that racing bike. When I set up my Peter Mooney, I put on a Laprade with its indents. Got the tilt right , midway between indents. Fine. But for the next 8 years I never touched it because I new I could never get that position back. Finally, I saw a Suntour post in a shop display case!

Ben

Last edited by 79pmooney; 04-01-18 at 11:25 PM.
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Old 04-02-18, 03:01 AM
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Wrenches and Adjustments

I got my first all Campy bike at the end of 1973. A few weeks later I found this 12 Pint 10mm wrench at a local Schwinn dealer. They were made special for Schwinn and I think they came with Paramounts at the time. (Park sold them to Schwinn but I'm pretty sure that SnapOn made them).

It was somewhat of a copy of the Campy 771 seatpost wrench which were only 6 point and were somewhat less than useless.

The BEST tool is the Sears Craftsman Flex Head Ratchet Wrench. Makes adjustments easy. Best $20 tool I've bought.

I set up all of my bikes pretty much the same by measuring the distance from the pedal spindle where it goes into the crank to the top of the saddle. (85cm - 86cm)

I use a dial angle finder set on the flat rear section of the saddle. 7° to 10° pointing down from the flat across the back.

If I haven't been riding for I while, I start off lowering my saddle by about maybe up to 1/4" (6mm).

When my saddle is properly adjusted my weight is balanced between my feet and there in not undue pressure on my hands. I don't feel the saddle or the bars.

The last picture is Eddie Merckx adjusting his saddle on the go.

There's a video of him riding through a small ville leaning up against a support car while he's switching saddles, seat post and all.

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Attached Images
File Type: jpg
SchwinnSeatWrench0002.JPG (40.4 KB, 189 views)
File Type: jpg
Campy771SeatpostWrench.jpg (91.4 KB, 189 views)
File Type: jpg
Sears10mm-FlexRatchetWrench.jpg (26.4 KB, 195 views)
File Type: jpg
EddyMerckxAdjustingSeatFaema.jpg (113.3 KB, 190 views)
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Old 04-02-18, 06:57 AM
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Originally Posted by FrejusFlyer View Post
Hey all,
On the two bolt design, is the front bolt for tilt and the back bolt for moving the saddle on the rails?
Or do you need to loosen both bolts? I don't have the angled 10mm
wrench, so I don't want to have to deal with both bolts unless I have to 😊
Thanks much,
Rich
You need to loosen both bolts to move the saddle. They made a special wrench, bent so that it could fit up under the skirt of a Brooks Pro saddle to get at the bolts.

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Old 04-02-18, 08:38 AM
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Originally Posted by FrejusFlyer View Post
I did a google search and found lots of things but nothing that directly related to the two bolts doing different things. If I just want to move the saddle back on the rails, do I still need to loosen both bolts?
If you're happy with the angle, then you only need to play with one bolt. Loosen one (usually the rear one) until you can move the saddle forward or backward as desired, then tighten up again.

If you want to raise or lower the nose of the saddle, you will need to play with both bolts. Even so, you can do most of what you need to do by working with only the rear bolt. Once the rear one is loose, loosen the front bolt a little to raise the nose, or tighten it to lower the nose; then tighten up the back again.
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Old 04-02-18, 10:32 AM
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For what it’s worth, if you use a seat with a cutout, adjusting those Campy posts is a snap.
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Old 04-02-18, 11:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Aubergine View Post
For what it’s worth, if you use a seat with a cutout, adjusting those Campy posts is a snap.
Or one with no side skirts!



I also have an angled wrench that it much thinner than a standard wrench. That helps a lot.
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Old 04-02-18, 02:11 PM
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Originally Posted by jjhabbs View Post
Point gun to head and shoot...LOL just kidding
Yup, that's about it.
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Old 04-02-18, 02:11 PM
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Campag, had Brooks Team Pro in mind..
when making those: https://cdn3.bigcommerce.com/s-1rmgck...0.1280.JPG?c=2

a perfect match.. easy to lift the side skirt a bit..







...

Last edited by fietsbob; 04-02-18 at 02:16 PM.
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Old 04-02-18, 03:29 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Campag, had Brooks Team Pro in mind..
when making those: https://cdn3.bigcommerce.com/s-1rmgck...0.1280.JPG?c=2

a perfect match.. easy to lift the side skirt a bit...
Right. On a Brooks or similar leather saddle, just lift the side skirt to reach the bolt heads. NBD. Plastic saddles require more tool gymnastics.
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Old 04-02-18, 04:53 PM
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Don't lift the skirt on a new leather saddle. The leather will crack right in front of the side rivets, leading to the early death of the saddle.
A peeve of mine is folks who admire a vintage bike's leather saddle and somehow can't resist playing with it, lifting the side flap is something I've seen more than once, might get a fellow hurt one of these days.
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Old 04-03-18, 01:39 PM
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
Don't lift the skirt on a new leather saddle. The leather will crack right in front of the side rivets, leading to the early death of the saddle.
I have never seen this happen in all my years of lifting Brooks saddle skirts. I don't even see how it's possible, the leather bends a long way from the rivets. Clearly YMMV.

Originally Posted by dddd View Post
A peeve of mine is folks who admire a vintage bike's leather saddle and somehow can't resist playing with it, lifting the side flap is something I've seen more than once, might get a fellow hurt one of these days.
Of course I would never lift any lady's or fellow's skirt without their express permission.

Might get you hurt? Hell, it might get you kilt!
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Old 04-03-18, 02:23 PM
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Rhm has it right. Loosening one bolt actually loosens both of them. I use a Craftsman 10 mm combination wrench and I lift the skirt on a Brooks without causing it any permanent damage.
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Old 04-03-18, 03:40 PM
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I HATE this style of seatpost! I don't know who Laprade was, but he was a genius.

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