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Mixte Peugeot

Old 04-02-18, 09:01 AM
  #1  
Vcycleta
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Mixte Peugeot


I found this, soon to be beauty, this past weekend. The seller advertised it as a ‘72 haven’t quite found in catalogs. I also believe that it was Updated at some point as there is a bracket for only one shifter on the frame. I would like to restore to its original state and would appreciate some input.
Thanks in advance
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Old 04-02-18, 10:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Vcycleta View Post

I found this, soon to be beauty, this past weekend. The seller advertised it as a ‘72 haven’t quite found in catalogs. I also believe that it was Updated at some point as there is a bracket for only one shifter on the frame. I would like to restore to its original state and would appreciate some input.
Thanks in advance
The inexpensive ten-speed diamond frame Peugeots had one boss for the rear shift lever, and used a band around the tube to add the front derailleur shifter. Of course Mixte frames would be different. Where are the shifters mounted on the bike?
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Old 04-02-18, 11:39 AM
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I wish posting pics wasn’t so hard...

https://flickr.com/photos/142311368@...57693391930911
Originally Posted by Aubergine View Post
The inexpensive ten-speed diamond frame Peugeots had one boss for the rear shift lever, and used a band around the tube to add the front derailleur shifter. Of course Mixte frames would be different. Where are the shifters mounted on the bike?
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Old 04-02-18, 12:12 PM
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That should clean up really nicely!

Pic assist:

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Old 04-02-18, 12:25 PM
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Yep, you need one of the Simplex shift lever bands. They look like this:

https://www.google.com/search?tbm=is...CVpSqGF8D8J1M:
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Old 04-02-18, 12:29 PM
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You've got an early-to-mid 1970s Peugeot UO-18. It's essentially the mixte version of the ubiquitous UO-8.

1972 is plausible. To confirm, you may be able to find date codes stamped into the Rigida rims or on the back side of the rear derailleur cage between the pulleys.

The single shifter boss on the frame is original. Like Aubergine mentioned, a lot of lower-end Peugeots were equipped with a single shifter boss. The shifter for the rear derailleur mounted to this boss. The shifter for the front derailleur mounted to a band, and the right-side boss kept the band from slipping. The SunTour shifters on your bike are definitely not original, so maybe a previous owner decided to switch from downtube shifters.

As for restoring the bike... Let me first point out that I really, really like my '72 Peugeot UO-8, which is a lot like your UO-18. It's a very comfortable bike to ride and it's got some vintage character. But with that said, these bikes had a lot of shortcomings as originally equipped. Since these bikes don't have any appreciable collector value, it's not a major faux pas to sacrifice some of the bike's originality for the sake of practicality and safety. You can make changes and upgrades using period-correct parts or tasteful updates that fit the character of the bike, while making it a better bike to ride. First and foremost, the Delrin (plastic) parts that get brittle with age are candidates for replacement. The front derailleurs almost always have broken clamps. The rear derailleurs aren't quite as fragile ...unless you count the pulleys. The Delrin downtube shift levers were flimsy even when new. Delrin brake levers?! Yeah, I like playing Russian roulette with my brakes. "Maybe this will be the time the lever snaps... Let me squeeze it and find out!"

<EDIT> And just because they might as well be cousins, I've attached a picture of my '72 UO-8. I've since replaced the saddle with something more appropriate and I've got a nicer looking crankset that I just haven't gotten around to installing yet.
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Old 04-02-18, 12:35 PM
  #7  
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I guess Mixte s are secretly my thing hahaha! I love these machines, I already go a pair of lighter wheels for it and I would like to change crank to something cotterles.

Originally Posted by SkyDog75 View Post
You've got an early-to-mid 1970s Peugeot UO-18. It's essentially the mixte version of the ubiquitous UO-8.

1972 is plausible. To confirm, you may be able to find date codes stamped into the Rigida rims or on the back side of the rear derailleur cage between the pulleys.

The single shifter boss on the frame is original. Like Aubergine mentioned, a lot of lower-end Peugeots were equipped with a single shifter boss. The shifter for the rear derailleur mounted to this boss. The shifter for the front derailleur mounted to a band, and the right-side boss kept the band from slipping. The SunTour shifters on your bike are definitely not original, so maybe a previous owner decided to switch from downtube shifters.

As for restoring the bike... Let me first point out that I really, really like my '72 Peugeot UO-8, which is a lot like your UO-18. It's a very comfortable bike to ride and it's got some vintage character. But with that said, these bikes had a lot of shortcomings as originally equipped. I've listed some of the common complaints below. Since these bikes don't have any appreciable collector value, it's not a major faux pas to sacrifice some of the bike's originality for the sake of practicality and safety. You can make changes and upgrades using period-correct parts or tasteful updates that fit the character of the bike, while making it a better bike to ride. First and foremost, the Delrin (plastic) parts that get brittle with age are candidates for replacement. The front derailleurs almost always have broken clamps. The rear derailleurs aren't quite as fragile ...unless you count the pulleys. The Delrin downtube shift levers were flimsy even when new. Delrin brake levers?! Yeah, I like playing Russian roulette with my brakes. "Maybe this will be the time the lever snaps... Let me squeeze it and find out!"
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Old 04-02-18, 12:52 PM
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Right, it's not a collector's item and functionality and "flavor" are important but originality (unless it's a pristine example) is not, in my opinion.

The derailleurs can be replaced with non-plastic Simplex (which may be labeled "Peugeot") or something else. People like Suntour Cyclone derailleurs, I sort of like some of the better Huret of the era. Huret stuff doesn't get a lot of love, but they made some decent stuff (and a bunch of crap) and it's cheap. This is sort of a "flavor" thing to me -- French bikes::French parts. If you are interested in Simplex, look for metal derailleurs with crapped out wheels -- Suntour of the era are a drop-in fit (as well as repro Suntour wheels from the likes of VO).

The cotters for the crank may be a different diameter than "typical". Pays to measure.

The freewheel is probably Maillard and is likely metric/French thread. If you decide on rebuilding the wheels with alloy rims, check out the hub first as metric/threaded freewheels are not nearly as common as 1.375"X24tpi. Those look like Normandy Sport hubs and English threaded examples are readily available.
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Old 04-02-18, 12:54 PM
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here's a couple I put together over the last few years.




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Old 04-02-18, 01:24 PM
  #10  
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Originally Posted by desconhecido View Post
The cotters for the crank may be a different diameter than "typical". Pays to measure.
The cotters for the bike's original Nervar crankset would be 9 mm, with a very long taper that extends all the way to the end of the cotter, or pretty darn close.

Originally Posted by desconhecido View Post
The freewheel is probably Maillard and is likely metric/French thread.
Quite a few French bikes exported to the U.S., including Peugeot UO-8's and similar models, were equipped with English/ISO threaded freewheels even if everything else on the bike was French sized & threaded. Assuming he's in the U.S., I'd be pretty surprised if @Vcycleta 's bike had a French-threaded freewheel.

(My UO-8's freewheel was an Atom, for whatever it's worth.)
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Old 04-02-18, 01:31 PM
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I agree with the others who suggest that judicious changes are a good thing. My AO-8 got the royal treatment, but then it is a great bike to ride and was worth every cent.

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Old 04-02-18, 01:34 PM
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Here's a link to the catalog for the 1974 model, identical to the '72 model.

http://www.bikeboompeugeot.com/Broch...20Page%209.jpg
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Old 04-02-18, 01:54 PM
  #13  
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@Aubergine: wow that’s beautiful!
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Old 05-16-18, 09:27 AM
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So i am almost done fixing this one up attempted riding it today but, rear wheel i put on it keeps moving to non drive side and getting stuck. I updated to lighter alumminum 27s. what am i doing wrong here? he hub fits fine even though it's from another bike.
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Old 05-16-18, 11:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Vcycleta View Post
So i am almost done fixing this one up attempted riding it today but, rear wheel i put on it keeps moving to non drive side and getting stuck. I updated to lighter alumminum 27s. what am i doing wrong here? he hub fits fine even though it's from another bike.
If you're using a replacement quick-release rear wheel, sometimes the axle ends stick out too far and the quick-release lever doesn't clamp down properly. Look to see if the axle ends protrude past the edge of the dropouts. If so, you might add some spacers/washers to move the dropouts farther out.
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Old 05-16-18, 01:08 PM
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A 22" white UO-18 -- we could not keep those in stock when I worked at a Peugeot/Nishiki dealership in the early 1970s. This was the steed of choice among our taller female customers.

(When I told my boss my wife-to-be wanted a Peugeot, he was visibly relieved when I told him she wanted an AO-8 or UO-8, rather than a 22" mixte. I bought a red 1970 UO-8, fitted it with UO-18 upright bars, TA cranks, and a wide-range SunTour rear derailleur, and that was her transportation while I was still a starving grad student. She later decided she preferred riding away from traffic, so I built her a mountain bike and repurposed the UO-8 as my commuter/beater.
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Old 05-16-18, 07:26 PM
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Nice save on the old Peugeot!, if you are going back to an original shift set up this link might help you see how it goes together, if you have a local bike co-op that would be a good source for that type of vintage part, although those Suntour stem shifters work very well and imho are as good or better than the simplex, although certainly not stock. And be very careful with the front derailleur, they have a derlin plastic body in that era and are prone to cracking if you look at them wrong.
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Old 05-17-18, 09:50 AM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by jj1091 View Post
If you're using a replacement quick-release rear wheel, sometimes the axle ends stick out too far and the quick-release lever doesn't clamp down properly. Look to see if the axle ends protrude past the edge of the dropouts. If so, you might add some spacers/washers to move the dropouts farther out.

I can't quite see your original rear quick release skewer (the pinching thing), but an original Peugeot will probably have had a "Simplex" skewer, and it has more parts than usual and clamps very strangely (unless you are French).

I would try to reuse the skewer that came with your donor wheels, and give it a retry.

edit: I just zoomed in a little more on your original picture, and I do belve that is a Simplex skewer, perhaps with parts missing, so I reitrerate to try a diferent skewer.
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Old 05-17-18, 07:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Aubergine View Post
I agree with the others who suggest that judicious changes are a good thing. My AO-8 got the royal treatment, but then it is a great bike to ride and was worth every cent.

Sweet old Peugeot, like the component mix!

Check your front RHS brake pads, look like they need to be adjusted so they're level with the rim.
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Old 05-23-18, 06:14 AM
  #20  
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I was able to fix issue w just adding a washer! Thank you! Took her on a joy ride this morning, definetly joyful little bike!





Originally Posted by jj1091 View Post
If you're using a replacement quick-release rear wheel, sometimes the axle ends stick out too far and the quick-release lever doesn't clamp down properly. Look to see if the axle ends protrude past the edge of the dropouts. If so, you might add some spacers/washers to move the dropouts farther out.
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Old 05-23-18, 12:08 PM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by Vcycleta View Post
I was able to fix issue w just adding a washer! Thank you! Took her on a joy ride this morning, definetly joyful little bike!





That turned out beautiful, enjoy the ride.
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Old 05-23-18, 01:54 PM
  #22  
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Very nice! Well done.
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Old 05-23-18, 02:45 PM
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(Delrin brake levers?! Yeah, I like playing Russian roulette with my brakes. "Maybe this will be the time the lever snaps... Let me squeeze it and find out!")

That part may not be so bad. I just picked up a pristine Gitane Gran Sport Mixte equivalent that has ivory delrin brake levers and to my delight, found there is a steel lever core. Magnet confirms it runs to the lever end. Don
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Old 05-23-18, 08:29 PM
  #24  
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Are reversed seat clamps another new trend that I have missed?
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Old 05-23-18, 10:05 PM
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No, you got it right. 1st thing I did was correct, it was upside down & backwards! Pics were as found, which looked good. But it shined up more with a clean & wax. I had raised the saddle for a test ride, but it is much better since the changed mount. 1 of my grand daughters will love it. Don
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