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Panasonic DX-5000 for the non-racer

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Panasonic DX-5000 for the non-racer

Old 04-17-18, 01:10 PM
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Panasonic DX-5000 for the non-racer

So, there's an '87 DX-5000 going for $400 on my local CL, in my size. Fantastic condition, still has original 600 groupset. It's been up for over a week and I'd try to get them down a bit. I've read tons of posts gushing about this bike. The thing is, I'm not a racer. I prefer my bikes more upright. I never get down in the drops on my already very upright Salsa Casseroll, it's hoods 90%, flats 10%. I'm young and pretty fit, so flexibility isn't the problem, I just don't like being hunched over. My riding style is exploring the countryside on a Saturday morning, not lycra group rides. Could this bike suit a more upright posture, like a sport tourer/rando bike, or was it just not built for that?
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Old 04-17-18, 02:23 PM
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I am comfortable on mine, but I also "ride the hoods" alot. I find it to be a great bike for racking up mileage for the sake of racking up mileage. That's why I got it. To travel light on a quick and nimble bike. The correct fit is critical. It sounds like a touring or sport touring bike, modern flat bar road bike, or an early 90s steel fitness/crossover/cx//hybrid might be on your possibilities list. $400 gives you alot of options.

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Old 04-17-18, 02:45 PM
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Not built for that, it’s a racing model. Lookfor a Sport Tourer instead. At that price you should be able to find one.
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Old 04-17-18, 03:11 PM
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Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
Not built for that, it’s a racing model. Look for a Sport Tourer instead. At that price you should be able to find one.
Be very specific in your requirements in searching for a bike new or used.
A "great deal" on a race bike that's unsuitable for your style of riding is a waste of time, effort and $.
C&V machines aren't just a trip down to the LBS to acquire in the right frame size/design/condition/price that's suitable. Patience, sticking to requirements and casting a wide net can pay off with a machine that's a good fit in more ways than one.

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Old 04-17-18, 03:55 PM
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Darn. I had seen some posts that mentioned DX-5000s together with some of the famous 80's sports tourers, like the Miyata 710. I'd also read that it would accept up to 28mm wheels without a sweat, so I hoped this could fit the bill for a lightweight rando style bike with fantastic steel. Don't get me wrong, I'm not looking to burn money, and there's no way I'd pay this guy $400 in the first place. I guess unless I hear other opinions telling me this frame could work nicely for these purposes I'll have to pass.
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Old 04-17-18, 04:17 PM
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Pretty bike. It appears to be an unmolested 1987.

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Old 04-17-18, 04:48 PM
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Originally Posted by cb400bill View Post
Pretty bike. It appears to be an unmolested 1987.

that'sthe one! sorry, should've posted a pic
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Old 04-17-18, 05:16 PM
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You could install a Technomic stem on there and make it a more upright ride.
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Old 04-17-18, 06:36 PM
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A sport touring bike like an '80s Trek 400T or Trek 420 with a triple chain wheel, or a Trek 520 touring bike probably are the types of bikes that would serve your needs best.They are more versatile. They would be a nice back-up to your Salsa Casserol. Again, $400 gives you plenty of options. I like my DX5000, but I have many bikes. If I were only to have 1 or 2 bikes, the DX5000 might not be one lf them. A Salsa Marrakesh, however, would probably be one.

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Old 04-17-18, 06:49 PM
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Originally Posted by cycleheimer View Post
A sport touring bike like an '80s Trek 400T or Trek 420 with a triple chain wheel, or a Trek 520 touring bike probably are the types of bikes that would serve your needs best.They are more versatile. Again, $400 gives you plenty of options. I like my DX5000, but I have many bikes. If I were only to have 1 or 2 bikes, the DX5000 might not be one lf them. A Salsa Marrakesh, however, would probably be one.
The thing is, i'm actually looking to get away from the triple. My Salsa Casseroll has a triple and 9 speed cassette and I never, ever shift out the middle chainring.
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Old 04-17-18, 06:50 PM
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Originally Posted by cb400bill View Post
You could install a Technomic stem on there and make it a more upright ride.
I will definitely do if I decide to pull the trigger.
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Old 04-17-18, 08:41 PM
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I also am not a racer; I'm a pure 'smell the roses' type of rider. And I prefer racing frames.
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Old 04-17-18, 08:53 PM
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Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
Not built for that, it’s a racing model. Lookfor a Sport Tourer instead. At that price you should be able to find one.
What magic is going to happen fit-wise with a sport tourer that can't happen on a "racing" bike?

The difference is mainly wheelbase and steering, not fit.
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Old 04-17-18, 09:00 PM
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Originally Posted by prairie.dog View Post
The thing is, i'm actually looking to get away from the triple. My Salsa Casseroll has a triple and 9 speed cassette and I never, ever shift out the middle chainring.
Your options just got a whole lot greater! Just need a good quality frame material, good components, correct fit, and something that wasn't abused or terribly neglected by previous owners. Something like the old Fuji S-12-S LTD might work. I'm currently riding a '70s French Motobecane alot. It's a 10-speed (2x5 style). Some of the early, high-end "hybrids" also have alot to offer. Can always do a drop bar conversion with bar end shifters.
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Old 04-18-18, 06:27 AM
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While you are not a racer, on the DX-5000 you may just get addicted to going rapidly.

You can always slow down.
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Old 04-18-18, 06:51 AM
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For my taste, given the riding you describe, tire clearance and fender mounts would be key features; maybe more so than geometry unless you think you’ll be carrying big loads. Dual bottle mounts are also nice to have but there are workarounds for those.
There is a “show your sport tourer” thread around here someplace. I would peruse that for inspiration.
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Old 04-18-18, 07:18 AM
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P1060472.JPG

A Nishiki Cresta also makes for a fine sport touring/touring bike too.
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Old 04-18-18, 08:07 AM
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Originally Posted by RobbieTunes View Post
While you are not a racer, on the DX-5000 you may just get addicted to going rapidly.

You can always slow down.
Yea, but who would want to slow down on a DX5000!
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Old 04-18-18, 09:18 AM
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I don't know why people talk about bikes as if their original intent actually dictates how you ride them. You can put skinny tires on an old MTB and ride it as fast as a racing bike, or take your time on a "racing" bike.
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Old 04-18-18, 09:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
I don't know why people talk about bikes as if their original intent actually dictates how you ride them. You can put skinny tires on an old MTB and ride it as fast as a racing bike, or take your time on a "racing" bike.
Probably because we collect up bikes like Imelda Marcos collected up shoes. It's when you are limited to one or two that you get creative. You then keep an extra wheel set with a different set of tires for a different purpose, a totally different set of tires for another purpose, different sets of pedals, and maybe an extra saddle or two mounted to seat posts, etc. Then you have your spare tires, tubes, brake pads, cables, etc. That's how I used to do it. Then I started hanging around this site, and similar ones, and became a bike-a-holic. Some bikes I hardly ride. I just rub them with a soft cotton diaper. Fortunately, the missus has a nice, high-end Cannondale that she adores.
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Old 04-18-18, 11:14 AM
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Originally Posted by due ruote View Post
For my taste, given the riding you describe, tire clearance and fender mounts would be key features; maybe more so than geometry unless you think you’ll be carrying big loads. Dual bottle mounts are also nice to have but there are workarounds for those.
There is a “show your sport tourer” thread around here someplace. I would peruse that for inspiration.
I think I agree with what you're saying. So long as the bikes geometry can roll with something more akin to this:



rather than this:



Really, what I guess what I'm after is, would the DX-5000 ride well with some 28mm tires and a tall stem with some nitto rando bars.
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Old 04-18-18, 11:25 AM
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It's hard to say how much you'd like it. Try it and see. If you have to sell it, you probably won't take a big loss. Who knows, you might even make a profit.
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Old 04-18-18, 11:40 AM
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Many of the '70s into early '80s bikes had more flexibility built in -- even the race models (often) had quite a bit of tire clearance, etc. Moving into the mid-80s, you tend to see shorter chainstays and tighter clearances all around. But if you're happy with 28s for the riding you do this should be a great bike. If you get itchy you might even be able to do a 650b conversion down the road and fit 38s. I personally have gotten spoiled on riding fat tires, but if that were not the case I would be tempted by a bike like that one.

Other considerations -- do you want to mount racks and/or fenders? Does this bike have eyelets to facilitate this?
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Old 04-18-18, 11:50 AM
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Originally Posted by inkandsilver View Post
Many of the '70s into early '80s bikes had more flexibility built in -- even the race models (often) had quite a bit of tire clearance, etc. Moving into the mid-80s, you tend to see shorter chainstays and tighter clearances all around. But if you're happy with 28s for the riding you do this should be a great bike. If you get itchy you might even be able to do a 650b conversion down the road and fit 38s. I personally have gotten spoiled on riding fat tires, but if that were not the case I would be tempted by a bike like that one.

Other considerations -- do you want to mount racks and/or fenders? Does this bike have eyelets to facilitate this?
+1 to this. For the kind of riding the OP is talking about, I would want the ability to run big tires - clearance for 35 or 38mm tires would be ideal. This means either a very modern gravel bike, or almost any quality "racing" bike from the early 70s or older. 28mm tires may be enough for his roads, but the latest light, supple fat tires are a revelation. Twice the comfort, with the same, or likely better speed. I got crap from riding buddies when they saw my new 38mm Gravel King tires, but that stopped after I passed them by 5+ mph repeatedly on the downhills.
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Old 04-18-18, 11:56 AM
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Originally Posted by seedsbelize View Post
I also am not a racer; I'm a pure 'smell the roses' type of rider. And I prefer racing frames.
+1. I prefer the liveliness of racing frames over purpose-made touring frames. Even the nice ones feel a little "dead" to me. I'm told that's because of the luggage-carrying requirements, but since I rarely carry much more than a spare tube and a credit card, even when touring, that's not an issue for me.

Two things that I do look for in a frame or bike these days:
  • can I fit 28mm tires? (the sweet spot for road and Eroica-terrain use)
  • French fit: can I get my bars close to level with the saddle without having to resort to one of those fugly Technomic stems?
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