Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Do you guys/gals have CF or Aluminum Bikes as well?

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Do you guys/gals have CF or Aluminum Bikes as well?

Old 04-29-18, 01:08 AM
  #1  
MookieBlaylock
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
MookieBlaylock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Redlands, CA
Posts: 172

Bikes: 1990 Miyata 914, 1989 Centurion Ironman Master

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Do you guys/gals have CF or Aluminum Bikes as well?

I have seen comments related to this, so sorry if I'm beating a dead horse. I'm sure many of you have experienced this, but I went into a few LBS to talk about something new for my wife. I ride steel because it is more comfortable to me than Aluminum, and I feel it unnecessary to drop a bunch of money on a bike that is supposed to be for exercise. Anyways, after talking to the people at the bike shops, I left thinking I am missing out on new technology.

I don't go on competitive group rides, and I'm not obsessed with the cycling scene. I just don't know what I am missing out on. I ride a hard 15-20 miles, and that wears me out. Do you guys/gals have other bikes besides vintage steel? If so, why do you like it? Does it make you want to ride more? Carbon Fiber feels like a cloud, but I just don't see the need to make the jump. It's peer pressure, I admit.
MookieBlaylock is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 01:39 AM
  #2  
brockd15 
Senior Member
 
brockd15's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Conroe, TX
Posts: 1,620
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 44 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
I've had carbon, titanium, aluminum, and steel but currently just have aluminum and steel. I don't think the frame material is the biggest factor, I think it's components. Handlebar shape and lever ergonomics are one of the big differences for me, along with easier shifting while climbing with brifters.
brockd15 is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 05:28 AM
  #3  
iab
Senior Member
 
iab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: NW Burbs, Chicago
Posts: 10,661
Mentioned: 146 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2137 Post(s)
Liked 1,238 Times in 577 Posts
If it makes you happy, material choice is irrelevant. If you are worn out at 15-20 miles, it is entirely about you and has nothing to do with the bike.
iab is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 05:40 AM
  #4  
rccardr 
aka: Dr. Cannondale
 
rccardr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 6,338

Bikes: Lots. Just...lots.

Mentioned: 176 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1474 Post(s)
Liked 719 Times in 362 Posts
^^ This.
I ride vintage steel and vintage aluminum and speed and endurance is directly tied to my physical condition and training.
Last year bought a carbon Canyon 11 speed with STI for local fast club rides, and while it makes it slightly easier for me to keep up with the pack, I don't feel I'm losing out when not riding it.
__________________
Hard at work in the Secret Underground Laboratory...
rccardr is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 05:57 AM
  #5  
Barrettscv 
Have bike, will travel
 
Barrettscv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Lake Geneva, WI
Posts: 12,266

Bikes: Ridley Helium SLX, Canyon Endurance SL, De Rosa Professional, Eddy Merckx Corsa Extra, Schwinn Paramount (1 painted, 1 chrome), Peugeot PX10, Serotta Nova X, Simoncini Cyclocross Special, Raleigh Roker, Pedal Force CG2 and CX2

Mentioned: 45 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 848 Post(s)
Liked 165 Times in 100 Posts
I have four carbon fiber bikes and seven steel bikes. The steel bikes are excellent, and provide excellent performance. The carbon bikes offer some features I consider to be important, including the ability to fit fatter tires and disc brakes while keeping total weight to less than 19 lbs.

I recently purchased a Canyon Endurace which has a carbon frameset, hydraulic disc brakes, 2x11 drivetrain and can fit 700x32 tires. It's an appealing combination of race-bike responsiveness and sport bike comfortable.

Modern bikes offer incremental improvements in materials, gearing, braking and can run a super smooth and fast tire at comfortable air pressures. I enjoy saving older racing bikes from neglect and I'm rewarded with a lively performance while riding my steel bikes. However, modern carbon bikes can deliver enhanced performance and versatility.
__________________
When I ride my bike I feel free and happy and strong. I'm liberated from the usual nonsense of day to day life. Solid, dependable, silent, my bike is my horse, my fighter jet, my island, my friend. Together we will conquer that hill and thereafter the world.

Last edited by Barrettscv; 04-29-18 at 06:18 AM.
Barrettscv is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 06:01 AM
  #6  
gearbasher
Senior Member
 
gearbasher's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Sitting on my butt in front of a computer
Posts: 962
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 212 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 59 Posts
I had and aluminum frame. Hated it. Not responsive and very springy. I rode a friends CF. It just felt dead. Like I couldn't feel the road.
Feeling worn out after 15-20 miles can be more from how well the bike fits you than the material it is made from.
gearbasher is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 06:28 AM
  #7  
jimmuller 
What??? Only 2 wheels?
 
jimmuller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Boston-ish, MA
Posts: 13,304

Bikes: 73 Raleigh Carlton Gran Sport, 72 Peugeot UO-8, 82 Peugeot TH8, 87 Bianchi Brava, 76? Masi Grand Criterium, 87 Centurion Ironman Expert, 74 Motobecane Champion Team, 86 & 77 Gazelle champion mondial, 81? Grandis, 82? Tommasini, 83 Peugeot PF10

Mentioned: 182 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1179 Post(s)
Liked 227 Times in 121 Posts
Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post
The carbon bikes offer some features I consider to be important, including the ability to fit fatter tires ...
When I first saw this I read it as "the ability to fix flatter tires" and I wondered how one tire could be flatter than another.

To answer the original question, noop. No carbon, no alunimunium. Just steel.
__________________
Real cyclists use toe clips.
With great bikes comes great responsibility.
jimmuller
jimmuller is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 06:29 AM
  #8  
Chrome Molly 
Senior Member
 
Chrome Molly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Forksbent, MN
Posts: 3,271

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 301 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 12 Posts
The 14 lb bike climbs better but doesn’t descend nearly as well for some reason. I definitely think that it is faster overall, but on longer rides I prefer the flexibility of my steel frame bikes. In my case it really is a straight comparison since the wheels and group were on my custom steel frame last year.

Each has advantages but the steel frames are more righter feeling mostly. Might have to do with what my teeth were cut on though...
Chrome Molly is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 06:31 AM
  #9  
Classtime 
Senior Member
 
Classtime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 2,725

Bikes: 81 Medici, 2011 Richard Sachs, 2011 Milwaukee Road

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1023 Post(s)
Liked 412 Times in 289 Posts
No.
Classtime is online now  
Old 04-29-18, 06:35 AM
  #10  
thumpism 
Bikes are okay, I guess.
 
thumpism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Posts: 6,528

Bikes: Waterford Paramount Touring, Trek 510 city build, Giant CFM-2, Raleigh Sports 3-speeds in M23 & L23, Schwinn Cimarron oddball build, Marin Palisades Trail dropbar conversion, Nishiki Cresta GT

Mentioned: 52 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1909 Post(s)
Liked 654 Times in 468 Posts
Steel, plus a carbon hardtail mountain bike. I had an aluminum road bike but did not like the sound of it. How's that for a critique?
thumpism is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 06:44 AM
  #11  
friday1970
Senior Member
 
friday1970's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Brighton, Michigan
Posts: 561

Bikes: Optima Baron LR, '14 Nishiki Maricopa,'87 Trek 330 Elance, '89 Miyata 1400, '85 Peugeot PGN10, '04 Fuji Ace, '06 Giant Rincon, '95 Giant Allegre, '83 Trek 620, '86 Schwinn High Sierra

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 187 Post(s)
Liked 105 Times in 70 Posts
I have an aluminum department store Nishiki road bike. Bought as full aluminum. After replacing the fork, stem, handlebars, and seat post, it's very comfortable to ride now. Almost as much so as my steel road bikes. I recently completed a 200k on it, and I felt great afterwards.
friday1970 is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 06:53 AM
  #12  
Ex Pres 
Cat 6
 
Ex Pres's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Mountain Brook, AL
Posts: 7,359
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 445 Post(s)
Liked 92 Times in 64 Posts
Have one aluminum, a Casati, and I really like it. Rode it Tuesday. Have one magnesium, rode it yesterday; it's nice and smooth. Have a titanium, just to complete the metal superfecta. This goes along with lots of steel, I'll ride one of those today. I've never ridden a full carbon frame.

But I agree with the comment above, it's more about components. Modern components do provide some advantages, particularly over the varied terrain I have around here. But much of the difference is just that many of my older components have more wear, and don't operate near as crisply.

And do make sure your bike fits you, your riding style and your fitness level. Don't let a shop try to put you in a racer fit.
__________________
72 Frejus, Holdsworth Record & special CNC / 74 Italvega NR / c80 ?French? / 82 Raleigh Intl MkII / 83 Trek 620 / 87 Centurion IM MV / 03 Casati Dardo / 08 BF IRO / 09 Dogma FPX / 10 Vassago Fisticuff

Ex Pres is online now  
Old 04-29-18, 07:25 AM
  #13  
beicster 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Berea, KY
Posts: 859
Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 252 Post(s)
Liked 105 Times in 77 Posts
I have had three aluminum bikes over the years and have been perfectly happy with the ride quality. I gave one to my stepson because it was a bit too small for me, I sold one because I was not riding it (lull in riding, not because I did not like it) and I still have the other. I ride steel because I just like the way the way the smaller tubes look. I ride vintage steel because I like the challenge of buying an inexpensive frame of good quality and building a bike out of it.
__________________
Andy
beicster is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 07:53 AM
  #14  
gomango 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: STP
Posts: 15,160
Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 798 Post(s)
Liked 159 Times in 105 Posts
I have a Yeti SB5 plus which features a 5.5 pound CF frameset.

I could care less about the tech that goes into the bike.

However, I do care about the ride and the feeling of control as I hit the trails here in Minnesota.

It's an incredible confidence booster, let me tell you.

After riding the last two summers in Moab and Fruita, I can't wait to get this baby out there for the first time.

It handles a much wider tire than my old SB5, so I'm pretty pumped to see what that does as well.

https://www.yeticycles.com/bikes/sb5-plus
__________________


Bikes and stuff

https://www.flickr.com/photos/36270004@N06/
gomango is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 08:14 AM
  #15  
crank_addict
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 7,152
Mentioned: 93 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 391 Times in 256 Posts
I do occasionally and have been loaned modern CF -Felt, Trek, Giant. Super machines. I'm often the mindset of wanting but do come out of the ether. I don't race competitively and honestly can't justify, especially when I feel to 'have earned my workout' after riding some interesting old steel bike. And that includes my satisfaction riding really lower end vintage. Its the soul.

Would I take a modern CF if the price was irresistable -without question. Di2 please. Now if I had the green light, flush with money and pushed to buy a modern CF, I wouldn't. My dough would go to a custom fitted builder -steel with classic modern vibe.

As for aluminum and in my eyes call them modern, have a 1998 Cannondale road drop conversion, brifters, big wide 700c plus Headshock. Most plush riding bike... by far plus all the gears I would ever need. Its quite heavy and think it looks ugly. But its a great bike in other respects. Bike is mint and cost the same as a fine pair of tubular tires.

On the same 'path', got rid of a modern 2010 Giant rapid-1. Aluminum hydroformed with carbon fork. Like the above, converted to a drop bar. Terrific all round rider, set it up and made changes, used it for various events. Single long day events, gravel roads, hill climb territory, etc.. fit 32c / 700 and very capable. Great one would think but for longer saddle time, its harsh. Came in at 19 lbs. this bike like the above cost the same as a fine pair of tubular. Mint condition, away it went and in came a 79 Colnago. No brainer.

Edit: Allow me to rephrase 'no brainer'. Current project is maddening to likely crazy. Very early as in first US production Ti (incl. fork), with some interesting components, gearing for climbing walls to tall for wind on your tailside flats. Known as whippy and prone to breakage, I want to experience the vintage exotic, much like many want to experience the modern top tier exotic.

With that -go for it and happy riding

Last edited by crank_addict; 04-29-18 at 08:29 AM.
crank_addict is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 09:50 AM
  #16  
2cam16
Senior Member
 
2cam16's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: San Mateo,Ca.
Posts: 3,890

Bikes: TRIMMED DOWN THE HERD

Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 947 Post(s)
Liked 571 Times in 402 Posts
I have three aluminums in my herd but to tell you the truth, I don't really care what a bike is made out of. Just as long as I'm happy with the ride, I'm good.
2cam16 is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 11:29 AM
  #17  
MookieBlaylock
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
MookieBlaylock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Redlands, CA
Posts: 172

Bikes: 1990 Miyata 914, 1989 Centurion Ironman Master

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by iab View Post
If you are worn out at 15-20 miles, it is entirely about you and has nothing to do with the bike.
I'm not sure what this means.
MookieBlaylock is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 11:40 AM
  #18  
jtbadge
Senior Member
 
jtbadge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 460

Bikes: Newish steel.

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 117 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Those thinking steel is the only material worth riding need to try more modern aluminum. I has a CAAD10 and loved it, but the fit wasn't right, so I passed it on. Now my main road bike is a Rock Lobster with aluminum tubes. Lightweight for climbing, stiff with immediate power transfer, but the large diameter tubes eat up road buzz. Most comfortable bike I've ever owned, and I've ridden a stack of steel bikes before getting here.

jtbadge is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 11:48 AM
  #19  
MookieBlaylock
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
MookieBlaylock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Redlands, CA
Posts: 172

Bikes: 1990 Miyata 914, 1989 Centurion Ironman Master

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post
I have four carbon fiber bikes and seven steel bikes. The steel bikes are excellent, and provide excellent performance. The carbon bikes offer some features I consider to be important, including the ability to fit fatter tires and disc brakes while keeping total weight to less than 19 lbs.

I recently purchased a Canyon Endurace which has a carbon frameset, hydraulic disc brakes, 2x11 drivetrain and can fit 700x32 tires. It's an appealing combination of race-bike responsiveness and sport bike comfortable.

Modern bikes offer incremental improvements in materials, gearing, braking and can run a super smooth and fast tire at comfortable air pressures. I enjoy saving older racing bikes from neglect and I'm rewarded with a lively performance while riding my steel bikes. However, modern carbon bikes can deliver enhanced performance and versatility.
The gearing options is something that is appealing. I think I have a 13x24 right now. I also don't have the need to accommodate the wide tires that you mentioned. I guess that's why I feel content on steel. My bikes fit 25mm with the exception of one in the front. I like the challenge and the hunt to fix up a bike that once was the best of its day.
MookieBlaylock is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 11:51 AM
  #20  
MookieBlaylock
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
MookieBlaylock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Redlands, CA
Posts: 172

Bikes: 1990 Miyata 914, 1989 Centurion Ironman Master

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jtbadge View Post
Those thinking steel is the only material worth riding need to try more modern aluminum. I has a CAAD10 and loved it, but the fit wasn't right, so I passed it on. Now my main road bike is a Rock Lobster with aluminum tubes. Lightweight for climbing, stiff with immediate power transfer, but the large diameter tubes eat up road buzz. Most comfortable bike I've ever owned, and I've ridden a stack of steel bikes before getting here.

That's interesting that you mentioned the CAAD10. That is the bike that I was reading about yesterday that some people compare the ride quality much closer to carbon than what used to be the common belief.
MookieBlaylock is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 11:51 AM
  #21  
Oldguyonoldbike
Senior Member
 
Oldguyonoldbike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Norman, OK
Posts: 747

Bikes: Casati Laser, Colnago Tecnos, Ciöcc Exige, Black Mountain Cycles Road

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 45 Posts
I have one carbon fiber bike and two steel bikes that I ride regularly. The cf bike is ten years old, the steel bikes are twenty-three and thirty-four-years old. I bought the cf frame used, an ex demo in pristine condition, mainly out of curiosity. It does dampen road buzz, but it is also jarringly stiff on seems in the pavement or potholes. All in all comfort levels seem to even out. More road buzz on steel, but they are springier on rough roads. Being stiffer and about four pounds lighter than either of the steel bikes I can average slightly faster speeds on the cf. That being said, on mostly flat roads my fastest bike is steel.

The only aluminum bike I've ever had was a mid-range Raleigh cyclocross bike that never quite felt right, but that was due as much to geometry as to frame material. I was using mostly as a foul weather bike on the road. As a cx bike it probably would have been fine.

In short, it's all good. Fit and fitness are what really count.
Oldguyonoldbike is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 11:56 AM
  #22  
MookieBlaylock
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
MookieBlaylock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Redlands, CA
Posts: 172

Bikes: 1990 Miyata 914, 1989 Centurion Ironman Master

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by crank_addict View Post
I do occasionally and have been loaned modern CF -Felt, Trek, Giant. Super machines. I'm often the mindset of wanting but do come out of the ether. I don't race competitively and honestly can't justify, especially when I feel to 'have earned my workout' after riding some interesting old steel bike. And that includes my satisfaction riding really lower end vintage. Its the soul.

Would I take a modern CF if the price was irresistable -without question. Di2 please. Now if I had the green light, flush with money and pushed to buy a modern CF, I wouldn't. My dough would go to a custom fitted builder -steel with classic modern vibe.

As for aluminum and in my eyes call them modern, have a 1998 Cannondale road drop conversion, brifters, big wide 700c plus Headshock. Most plush riding bike... by far plus all the gears I would ever need. Its quite heavy and think it looks ugly. But its a great bike in other respects. Bike is mint and cost the same as a fine pair of tubular tires.

On the same 'path', got rid of a modern 2010 Giant rapid-1. Aluminum hydroformed with carbon fork. Like the above, converted to a drop bar. Terrific all round rider, set it up and made changes, used it for various events. Single long day events, gravel roads, hill climb territory, etc.. fit 32c / 700 and very capable. Great one would think but for longer saddle time, its harsh. Came in at 19 lbs. this bike like the above cost the same as a fine pair of tubular. Mint condition, away it went and in came a 79 Colnago. No brainer.

Edit: Allow me to rephrase 'no brainer'. Current project is maddening to likely crazy. Very early as in first US production Ti (incl. fork), with some interesting components, gearing for climbing walls to tall for wind on your tailside flats. Known as whippy and prone to breakage, I want to experience the vintage exotic, much like many want to experience the modern top tier exotic.

With that -go for it and happy riding
I like that mentality.
MookieBlaylock is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 11:59 AM
  #23  
MookieBlaylock
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
MookieBlaylock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Redlands, CA
Posts: 172

Bikes: 1990 Miyata 914, 1989 Centurion Ironman Master

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by gomango View Post
I have a Yeti SB5 plus which features a 5.5 pound CF frameset.

I could care less about the tech that goes into the bike.

However, I do care about the ride and the feeling of control as I hit the trails here in Minnesota.

It's an incredible confidence booster, let me tell you.

After riding the last two summers in Moab and Fruita, I can't wait to get this baby out there for the first time.

It handles a much wider tire than my old SB5, so I'm pretty pumped to see what that does as well.

https://www.yeticycles.com/bikes/sb5-plus
The confidence booster is appealing, I must admit. I'd like to see what I can do on a newer bike, but then I'd be content and wonder why I spent the money. Ha
MookieBlaylock is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 01:19 PM
  #24  
iab
Senior Member
 
iab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: NW Burbs, Chicago
Posts: 10,661
Mentioned: 146 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2137 Post(s)
Liked 1,238 Times in 577 Posts
Originally Posted by MookieBlaylock View Post
I'm not sure what this means.
Changing bike materials won't make you any less worn out. Only changing your fitness will.
iab is offline  
Old 04-29-18, 01:28 PM
  #25  
gomango 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: STP
Posts: 15,160
Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 798 Post(s)
Liked 159 Times in 105 Posts
Originally Posted by MookieBlaylock View Post
The confidence booster is appealing, I must admit. I'd like to see what I can do on a newer bike, but then I'd be content and wonder why I spent the money. Ha
The new mtbs are interesting.

For example, my SB5 plus has 5" of travel in the rear suspension.

In my case, it's not about speed. It's about keeping rubber on the trails and rocks for maneuvers and braking.

Definitely enhances stability, at least in my case.
__________________


Bikes and stuff

https://www.flickr.com/photos/36270004@N06/
gomango is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.