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Millenial meets C&V

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Old 07-11-18, 01:37 PM
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Oldguyonoldbike
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Millenial meets C&V

It's nice to see there are open-minded folks out there.

https://www.bikeradar.com/road/gear/...itannia-52615/
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Old 07-11-18, 03:55 PM
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Nice. That frame was actually built in Belgium, by Martens, I believe.
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Old 07-11-18, 05:05 PM
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??? ???

I'm a millenial and gravitate more towards C&V rides than the new stuff. One of the local co-ops is worked by a bunch of millenials and most ride C&V steeds. They wax poetic hymns about friction shifting, lol.

WhasDaBigDeal?
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Old 07-11-18, 05:08 PM
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A millennial on a C&V bike?

Isn’t that the very definition of a hipster?
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Old 07-11-18, 06:06 PM
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Originally Posted by zze86 View Post
??? ???

I'm a millenial and gravitate more towards C&V rides than the new stuff. One of the local co-ops is worked by a bunch of millenials and most ride C&V steeds. They wax poetic hymns about friction shifting, lol.

WhasDaBigDeal?
I've met only a handful of C&V riders in my area, and all except me and my sometimes riding buddy (who's about my age), almost all have been 20 somethings. Just like the 20 somethings that like muscle and pony cars from the 1960's, I haven't really notice much of a lack of appreciation for vintage vehicles, with or without engines.
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Old 07-11-18, 06:08 PM
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For a lot of us older C&Vers, the attraction to bikes from our time has something to do with the elegant ecclectic design and details we see on our C&V bikes. But will millennials feel similar about a the present, modern bikes they ride now, in the future?? Or will bikes from their time just come off as old bikes with obsolete technology that will not be worth their time bothering with at all....
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Old 07-11-18, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Chombi1 View Post
Or will bikes from their time just come off as old bikes with obsolete technology that will not be worth their time bothering with at all....
Probably this...same as most cars today, no one is going to say oh wow the 2018 Civic what a beautiful classic”. Whereas in the 50s and 60s people were aware right away that the car design was something special.

It it seems like bikes and cars are probably as aerodynamic as they can get right now so they will probably continue to look the way they do also, unless it is a throwback style on purpose.
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Old 07-11-18, 07:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Chombi1 View Post
For a lot of us older C&Vers, the attraction to bikes from our time has something to do with the elegant ecclectic design and details we see on our C&V bikes. But will millennials feel similar about a the present, modern bikes they ride now, in the future?? Or will bikes from their time just come off as old bikes with obsolete technology that will not be worth their time bothering with at all....

In the case of us younger guys (I'm GenX, myself) It's the accessability of the technology. There was a lot less specialization, and it's easier to mix-and-match to get some specific set of attributes with any combination of 70's 80's and 90's parts all on the same bike. Not that we're not tech savvy, but there's something to be said for creating something unique, using just your hand (tools)

Kind of like with cars, (particularly GM) there were components and systems that lived on for decades, (the SBC, TH-350/400/700, and 10-bolt, and a suprising number of suspension components) so it's easy to bring more modern performance / reliability, or achieve something unique, but still 'period'

I was watching the GCN tech vid about the 'custom' bikes of the TdF, and frankly, it's not much more than bars and colorways different from what you can buy off the rack. (or next year's model) The most interesting bike was actually the MAVIC neutral support 'spare' bike.
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Old 07-11-18, 07:48 PM
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My sons are millennials (1984 and 1989 models). The elder one rides my old 1980 Peugeot PKN-10, and the younger one has a Centurion Ironman from the early 1980s.
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Old 07-11-18, 07:53 PM
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Originally Posted by zze86 View Post
??? ???

I'm a millenial and gravitate more towards C&V rides than the new stuff. One of the local co-ops is worked by a bunch of millenials and most ride C&V steeds. They wax poetic hymns about friction shifting, lol.

WhasDaBigDeal?
This... exactly this! Plus C&V is just more fun to tinker with. They have so much more personality than anything out right now.
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Old 07-12-18, 06:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Chombi1 View Post
But will millennials feel similar about a the present, modern bikes they ride now, in the future?? Or will bikes from their time just come off as old bikes with obsolete technology that will not be worth their time bothering with at all....
won't all the crabon frames have asploded by then?
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Old 07-12-18, 07:01 AM
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Huh. It turns out I’m a millennial. I had thought the term for folks roughly my vintage was Generation Y, but after some reading that’s a synonym for the “millennial” label. Who knew?! I feel younger now.
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Old 07-12-18, 07:20 AM
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I guess “Gen X” is pretty close to being “old people” now...

There’s a time where something that is modern becomes old fashioned BEFORE it becomes classic or timeless.

Most young people I’ve seen on older bikes have them as hand-me-downs or as opportunistic inexpensive bikes. Not as searched out specific objects. There’s tons of reasons to fall into to C&V-
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Old 07-12-18, 07:38 AM
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Millenial here ('85). I work in the Chicago Loop and commute down Milwaukee Ave, which sees over 3000 commuters/day during Spring/Summer/Fall. There seems to be a pretty even split between those riding newer hybrids or race bikes, and those riding older 10 speeds.

Of those I know who take their riding "seriously" within the city for errands or commuting, they're either on modern production steel bikes, or modified vintage steel bikes. That is in stark contrast to those you see on the usual "roadie" route up Sheridan along the lake who are almost exclusively on newer aluminum or carbon race bikes.

For me, the entry into bikes was easier with C&V because it was accessible $$-wise at first, and then the interest continued to grow, perhaps out of some sense of contrarianism to the race-oriented cycling culture you see in marketing.

Don't see myself buying new anytime soon, but if I did, it would be modern production steel.
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Old 07-12-18, 08:29 AM
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Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
Most young people I’ve seen on older bikes have them as hand-me-downs or as opportunistic inexpensive bikes. Not as searched out specific objects. There’s tons of reasons to fall into to C&V-
I suppose I can add to this seeing as I’m a millennial now.

For me, similar to @bear_a_bug, C&V was an inexpensive way to get myself onto a high quality bike. In college I got back into cycling on a ‘91 Rockhopper hand-me-down from my father that I had outfitted with slicks at that point. It’s now back to full MTB duty. After a year or two on the Rockhopper I bought an ‘83 Centurion Pro Tour 15 off a buddy who had found it on CL - way too big for him. That kicked off the C&V interest in full — I think mostly due to ride quality, cost relative to high end modern bikes, and also aesthetics compared to high end modern bikes. Plus they’re easy to build in a number of ways to suit a given set of needs as mentioned above. I’ve been interested in vintage cars and racing/F1 since young to varying degrees, so vintage was just a natural place to go when I got back into cycling. That’s lead to the birth-year Colnago, the Motobeace, Windsor, Raleigh, Klein, Woodrup... I also have an ‘07 CAAD 9, but we don’t talk about such things here. That one’s a blast and on its way to being a classic in another decade or so.

If I bought something modern it’d be a Weigle, Ellis, etc. or a Black Mtn Cycles or Moots, Firefly, etc. Modern carbon like a Calfee or C60 could be fun, but then I’d have to cut back on my avocado toast to afford it (just kidding, I don’t like avocados).

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Old 07-12-18, 08:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Sir_Name View Post
Huh. It turns out I’m a millennial. I had thought the term for folks roughly my vintage was Generation Y, but after some reading that’s a synonym for the “millennial” label. Who knew?! I feel younger now.
I was wondering what happended to Gen Y, it was commonly used a while back. I guess it sounded generic after X so Millennial was popularized. I'm X.
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Old 07-12-18, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Bikerider007 View Post
I was wondering what happended to Gen Y, it was commonly used a while back. I guess it sounded generic after X so Millennial was popularized. I'm X.
Yeah, Gen Y is what I remember from my BMX days, back when my body bounced rather than broke.
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Old 07-12-18, 09:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Bikerider007 View Post
I was wondering what happended to Gen Y, it was commonly used a while back. I guess it sounded generic after X so Millennial was popularized. I'm X.
We are called Oregon Trail Generation. Well at least that is what I am and what I have read.

Oh I have two 1991 Treks so ya know total C&V!
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Old 07-12-18, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by voyager1 View Post


We are called Oregon Trail Generation. Well at least that is what I am and what I have read.

Oh I have two 1991 Treks so ya know total C&V!
Also Commander Keen, Space Quest...
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Old 07-12-18, 09:12 AM
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I'm 29, but it was pretty natural for me to gravitate towards vintage bicycles. My uncle has a hot rod restoration shop, and got me into road cycling when he let me borrow his old Centurion road bike that he built up around 1990. I've owned newer (and new) bikes but they all came and went, and I only really stop to admire vintage steel.

I also have a bachelor's degree in "Pre-1500 European History" and have been an historical reenactor since I was a kid, making and purchasing reproductions of artifacts that are thousands of years old. So riding a vintage bicycle isn't exactly something that feels vintage to me, honestly.

-Gregory
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Old 07-12-18, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Kilroy1988 View Post
I'm 29, but it was pretty natural for me to gravitate towards vintage bicycles. My uncle has a hot rod restoration shop, and got me into road cycling when he let me borrow his old Centurion road bike that he built up around 1990. I've owned newer (and new) bikes but they all came and went, and I only really stop to admire vintage steel.

I also have a bachelor's degree in "Pre-1500 European History" and have been an historical reenactor since I was a kid, making and purchasing reproductions of artifacts that are thousands of years old. So riding a vintage bicycle isn't exactly something that feels vintage to me, honestly.

-Gregory
My younger son is your age. He and I have similar tastes in bicycles (1960s into 1980s, lugged steel frames, barcons or downtube levers) and cars (anything that still has a traditional console-mounted gear select lever -- whether automatic or manual -- and mechanical parking brake lever and tactile buttons, knobs, and switches instead of a damnable touchscreen).
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Old 07-12-18, 10:51 AM
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I think there are more millennials on this forum than some of the older members might think. Apparently, I am a millennial by most definitions and I'm nearing 15 years of membership on this forum and of interest in Vintage bikes. I have, in recent years, taken a more keen interest in the bikes of my youth. Retro Mountain Bikes from the early 1990s. I was an avid mountain bike magazine reader from Late 1992 to 1995 and had a low-end MTB I loved riding in the woods. I got a real bike (Rocky Mountain Hammer) in 1995, but I took up dirt biking more keenly around 1996/7. I love the CNC, coloured anodizing craze of that era. There were so many beautiful aluminum and titanium parts from that period.

From Wikipedia:
"Millennials (also known as Generation Y) are the generational demographic cohort following Generation X. There are no precise dates for when this cohort starts or ends; demographers and researchers typically use the early 1980s as starting birth years and the mid-1990s to early 2000s as ending birth years. Millennials are sometimes referred to as "echo boomers" due to a major surge in birth rates in the 1980s and 1990s, and because millennials are often the children of the baby boomers. The 20th-century trend toward smaller families in developed countries continued, however, so the relative impact of the "baby boom echo" was generally less pronounced than the post–World War II baby boom."
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Old 07-12-18, 10:56 AM
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I'm an '82 model here, which was, of course, the best vintage... Actually, from what I've gleaned from the internet, the production occurred late in '81 for an '82 delivery... I'm constantly reminded by the original owner that this was the worst financial mistake of his life.

As others have stated above, there was a time in the early aughts when I was commuting by bike to college, and old bikes were just "Man's bike, $5" from an actual paper I would buy at a gas station. My curiosity and mechanical aptitude helped me foster a love of them, and the internet helped immensely, of course, but I think it all started with me being a thoroughbred cheapskate.

Now I have literally TENS of dollars, so I'm looking for more of the things that I can enjoy.
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Old 07-12-18, 12:09 PM
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Another millennial here. Been on this forum for a while. My start in bikes was all C&V -- mostly as a function of being a broke grad student. I will admit the last two bikes I've bought for my personal use are new. But still log most miles on C&V bikes.

I enjoy being known at the LBS as the guy who regularly outfits friends with C&V rides refitted for their particular use cases. It's hard for me to let go of bikes that fit me (like the pristine '84 Trek 420) , but luckily a bunch of the coolest ones -- an $80 Raleigh Portage, the $150 '84 Trek 620 -- haven't fit.
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Old 07-12-18, 12:24 PM
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It's great to see a new generation take on and take care of the vintage rigs we ride. Since they're not making any more vintage bikes, I'm imagining that prices will continue to go up. My plan is to start whittling down the herd when I get too old to ride them, hopefully get them to the young'uns that are keeping the flame alive.
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