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Tru-Wel Steel tube decal

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Tru-Wel Steel tube decal

Old 07-15-18, 03:19 PM
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Buellster 
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Tru-Wel Steel tube decal

Does anyone recognize this decal? I have scoured the web and haven't found this decal anywhere!
I'm trying to figure out what grade this frame is, if it is made of hi-ten or some such.
the frame fork blades are reynolds 531 and I find the combo of the two types of steel odd but Im new to vintage bikes so it may be more normal than I know.

Decal in question, is this a type of a tube or just a statment of it being produced by TI?


531 fork decal


My bike Roughly early 80s Harding of unknown origins
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Old 07-15-18, 03:36 PM
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Like most companies, Tru-Wel made various grades of tubing. Based on the lack of specifics on the decal, it is likely hi-tensile steel and this is supported by the presence of stamped rear dropouts with a claw mount rear derailleur and what appears to be a relatively small diameter seat post. Of course, the best indicator of tubing grade is the seat post diameter, providing it has been properly sized for the seat tube.

Regarding the fork, it may be a non-OEM decal but there were some smaller British manufacturers who believed that the most aspect to a comfortable ride was high grade front fork material. So, while atypical, it was not unknown to see a Reynolds 531 fork on an otherwise hi-tensile frameset.
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Old 07-15-18, 03:59 PM
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
Like most companies, Tru-Wel made various grades of tubing. Based on the lack of specifics on the decal, it is likely hi-tensile steel and this is supported by the presence of stamped rear dropouts with a claw mount rear derailleur and what appears to be a relatively small diameter seat post. Of course, the best indicator of tubing grade is the seat post diameter, providing it has been properly sized for the seat tube.

Regarding the fork, it may be a non-OEM decal but there were some smaller British manufacturers who believed that the most aspect to a comfortable ride was high grade front fork material. So, while atypical, it was not unknown to see a Reynolds 531 fork on an otherwise hi-tensile frameset.
Would these measurements help you at all?

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Old 07-15-18, 04:01 PM
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Wait, is tru-wel it's own company?
I thought it was a part of Tubing Investments. Sorry about my lack of knowledge.
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Old 07-15-18, 09:09 PM
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If you want to do this stuff, you need to invest in a dial (C&V) or digital (newfangled) caliper. For a British bike, 26.4 or so mm seatpost would be for straight-gauge, while 27.2 would be for double-butted. In a butted tubeset, it's usual for the top of the seat tube to be unbutted, so the top of that tube is the same inside diameter as the tube's center portion. OD would be 28.6 mm (1.125") for both straight-gauge and butted.
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Old 07-15-18, 09:38 PM
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Tru-wel was actually a brand name for seamed tubes manufactured by electrical welding. The company that manufactured Tru-wel was Tube Products Ltd.,located in Oldbury, Birmingham, England. The company was founded in 1929, as a subsidiary of Tube Investments Ltd. While cycle tubing was a major product, they also produced tubing for the automotive, chemical and furniture industries, among many others.

The ideal method to measure the seat post and inner diameter of the seat tube is with a caliper. A tape measure is typically not accurate enough but in this case it is sufficient to tell that it's very close to 1" (25.4mm), which is typical of hi-tensile steel.It's certainly not the 1-1/16" (27.0mm) you would expect for a seat post used with a Reynolds 531 butted seat tube.
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Old 07-15-18, 09:52 PM
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
Tru-wel was actually a brand name for seamed tubes manufactured by electrical welding. The company that manufactured Tru-wel was Tube Products Ltd.,located in Oldbury, Birmingham, England. The company was founded in 1929, as a subsidiary of Tube Investments Ltd. While cycle tubing was a major product, they also produced tubing for the automotive, chemical and furniture industries, among many others.

The ideal method to measure the seat post and inner diameter of the seat tube is with a caliper. A tape measure is typically not accurate enough but in this case it is sufficient to tell that it's very close to 1" (25.4mm), which is typical of hi-tensile steel.It's certainly not the 1-1/16" (27.0mm) you would expect for a seat post used with a Reynolds 531 butted seat tube.
Cool I figured it would be enough to ball park it.
I'm getting the feeling this is a lower quilaity frame... would I be right on that?
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Old 07-15-18, 10:07 PM
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I realize I'm talking to you about pretty much the same thing in two threads so feel free to just respond to one or the other haha
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Old 07-16-18, 08:54 AM
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If you want a more accurate measurement pending acquisition of calipers, it is quite easy:

1.Cut a strip of paper, approximately 1cm x 10cm.

2. Wrap it tightly around a clean section of the seat post.

3.Using a sharp pencil, mark the paper where it overlaps.

4. Remove the paper and measure the longer distance from one end to the pencil mark. You should be able to accurately measure to the nearest 0.5mm.

5. Divide the measurement by pi (3.14) to calculate the diameter of the seat post. Provided you were accurate to within 0.5mm in the above step, the diameter should be accurate to within 0.2mm.

6. Repeat steps 2-5 to check your result.

Using this method, I'm able to routinely measure seat posts within 0.2mm of my caliper measurements.
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Old 07-16-18, 01:06 PM
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
If you want a more accurate measurement pending acquisition of calipers, it is quite easy:

1.Cut a strip of paper, approximately 1cm x 10cm.

2. Wrap it tightly around a clean section of the seat post.

3.Using a sharp pencil, mark the paper where it overlaps.

4. Remove the paper and measure the longer distance from one end to the pencil mark. You should be able to accurately measure to the nearest 0.5mm.

5. Divide the measurement by pi (3.14) to calculate the diameter of the seat post. Provided you were accurate to within 0.5mm in the above step, the diameter should be accurate to within 0.2mm.

6. Repeat steps 2-5 to check your result.

Using this method, I'm able to routinely measure seat posts within 0.2mm of my caliper measurements.
Im pretty near my LBS so Ill likely have them do the measuring. That is an excellent trick though, I will definitely keep it in mind. Thanks!
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