Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Why canít I get past 8?

Old 09-29-18, 04:28 AM
  #1  
mountaindave 
Happy Commuter
Thread Starter
 
mountaindave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Flathead Valley, MT
Posts: 3,315

Bikes: Red bikes. Why do I have so many red bikes?! I thought green was my favorite color

Mentioned: 94 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 672 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 4 Posts
Why canít I get past 8?

I have a number of bikes that I have built with 8s drivetrains that are 8/9/10 compatible (none with brifters at the moment, but I have two sets of Sachs ergos waiting...). I have even bought two sets of 10s bar end shifters (donít ask me why... but then most people here probably arenít phased by that) and a 10s cassette. But I still canít bring myself to set a bike up with 10s. (9s is just out of the question because it feels like a red-headed step child.)

Maybe itís becasue 8s just works. I can build wonderful cassette combos that donít seem to be ďlacking.Ē The chains I buy are backward compatible with all my 7s, 6s and 5s bikes.

Perhaps I am afraid of 10s chains and their chainring differences. Perhaps I am stuck in the early 90ís (formative high school days).

I just canít get past 8.
mountaindave is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 04:54 AM
  #2  
Giacomo 1 
Senior Member
 
Giacomo 1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Queens NYC
Posts: 3,183

Bikes: Colnago Super, Basso Gap, Pogliaghi, Fabio Barecci, Torelli Pista, Miyata 1400A

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 311 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Maybe because you don't really need more than 8?

I have 1 9 speed, and I rarely (never) use all of it. 7 speed seems to be my sweet spot and all that I really ever need. But I'm not climbing the Alps either.
Giacomo 1 is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 04:58 AM
  #3  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 22,439
Mentioned: 166 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8518 Post(s)
Liked 76 Times in 68 Posts
Each person is a bit different.

I spent most of my life riding 5x2 and 6x2 drivetrains. When ten-speed really meant ten-speed.

I think I had settled on 42/54 x 13/23 or so. Over the last couple of years, I've been expanding my gearing range somewhat, especially hitting the high end a bit more (as well as going to a 53/34 wide range crankset). I was never satisfied with the 13T. I did get a 12T cluster years ago, but wore out the 12T.

Anyway, for general riding, I just don't need anything more than that 34/23. A bit more might be nice for certain cargo loads, and those super-steep > 20% hills, but not for most of my riding.

I've gone to 11-speed just so I can get a few more of those high gears (which I don't use as often as I thought I would). But, I can see why one might choose 8s or 9s.
CliffordK is online now  
Old 09-29-18, 05:06 AM
  #4  
SJX426 
Senior Member
 
SJX426's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Fredericksburg, Va
Posts: 6,319

Bikes: '72 Motobecane Le Champion(totaled), '73 Bottecchia Giro d'Italia, '83 Colnago Superissimo, '84 Trek 610, '84 Trek 760, '88 Pinarello Tre Cime, '91 Pinarello Montello, '94 Burley Duet, 97 Specialized RockHopper, 2010 Langster, Tern Link D8

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 468 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
@mountaindave - My largest block is on one bike and it is 8V. I think it is just about right. I find a lot of hills to take advantage of the large sprocket (23t) and a few downhills that let me get to a decent cadence with the smallest (24). I can now understand the 1x10/11 approach. The issue for me is being able to get a low enough ratio for steeper hills. If I liked the spacing on the current block, I guess there would be a reason for 10 to go a couple more teeth on the large and one down on the small. Hmmmmmmm.

BTW I just converted to Ergo's from DT index and am shifting a lot more and feeling more comfortable. On really bumpy roads, being able to shift confidently in heavy traffic is a real relief.
__________________
Bikes don't stand alone. They are two tired.
SJX426 is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 05:08 AM
  #5  
RobbieTunes 
Half drunk? Finish!
 
RobbieTunes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Very Southern Indiana
Posts: 25,756
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 346 Post(s)
Liked 60 Times in 50 Posts
Originally Posted by mountaindave View Post
I have a number of bikes that I have built with 8s drivetrains that are 8/9/10 compatible (none with brifters at the moment, but I have two sets of Sachs ergos waiting...). I have even bought two sets of 10s bar end shifters (donít ask me why... but then most people here probably arenít phased by that) and a 10s cassette. But I still canít bring myself to set a bike up with 10s. (9s is just out of the question because it feels like a red-headed step child.)

Maybe itís becasue 8s just works. I can build wonderful cassette combos that donít seem to be ďlacking.Ē The chains I buy are backward compatible with all my 7s, 6s and 5s bikes.

Perhaps I am afraid of 10s chains and their chainring differences. Perhaps I am stuck in the early 90ís (formative high school days).

I just canít get past 8.
Count with your thumbs, too.
RobbieTunes is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 05:10 AM
  #6  
abellanti
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 244
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
i have bikes ranging from 5 to 11 speeds. I have always thought nine was perfect for me. 11 speed setup seems a little to finicky and always seems to be fine tuned. I also like the look of nine speed groups on vintage bikes. The shifting is solid, the cassette range is good, the design is pleasing...no need for more.
abellanti is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 05:16 AM
  #7  
RobbieTunes 
Half drunk? Finish!
 
RobbieTunes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Very Southern Indiana
Posts: 25,756
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 346 Post(s)
Liked 60 Times in 50 Posts
8....

If you have the range and the legs, you only need what your cogs provide.....I have some 13-28 7sp setups that work for 99% of my riding.

However, the weight difference with a 2x9 or 2x10 DA set of downtube shifters and modern, light wheels and cassette attracted me to try it.

I liked it.

Nimble , quick, flexible, all the advantage of downtube shifting and the weight and range of modern stuff.

Give it a try?
RobbieTunes is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 05:25 AM
  #8  
masi61
Senior Member
 
masi61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 2,056

Bikes: Puch Marco Polo, Saint Tropez, Masi Gran Criterium

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 390 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 9 Times in 9 Posts
I was stuck in the 1980’s and 6/7 speed for the longest time. When I went to 9 speed (only about 9 years ago, 10 had already been out for a few years when I cautiously ordered my 7700 parts) - I felt so great shifting through those 9 gears.

You’re the most intuitive type of cyclist! You get it with your 8 speed setups. I agree that they are great too! Such reliability, affordability and no real deficits if you change your range carefully. Plus the cogs last forever, it seems. My SunTour Superbe Pro 8 speed cassette bike is badass! The shifting with my Command thumbshifters, XC Pro short cage rear derailleur and Wippermann inox 8 speed chain is very different than Shimano but no less precise.

But Shimano is also precise. And the more cogs you add, the more you’re going to love that 16 tooth or 18 tooth you were lacking before. This year was the 1st year I rode (used) Dura Ace 7800 equipped bike. The 10 speed cassette is a SRAM PG-1070 (12-25). I really did not expect the shifting to feel much different than the 7700/7703 of my other bike, but it was!

My hat is off to you for rocking the 8 speed so successfully. Because you have amassed a few of the 10 speed parts, now is the time to complete that new (old- ha Ha) build. You will gain new depth of insight about the things that have worked really well for you. But you will also be treated to how great 15 year old bike technology was and is....
masi61 is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 05:51 AM
  #9  
52telecaster
ambulatory senior
 
52telecaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Peoria Il
Posts: 2,649

Bikes: Bob Jackson World Tour, 81 miyata 912 and 86 miyata 312.

Mentioned: 35 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 816 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 21 Times in 10 Posts
8 speed is extremely versatile and affordable. You'll get no argument from me but then I am a slow tourist.
52telecaster is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 05:55 AM
  #10  
plonz 
Senior Member
 
plonz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Northampton, MA
Posts: 1,900
Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 374 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My own experience is 6/7/8 are fine when riding alone, in casual groups or even in fast groups using a narrow block with no hills. Faster the group and greater the elevation = more the gears needed.

When I put 11 speed on my Raleigh, I gained a 16t which really helped level out my cadence in mid 20s pace lines. I ride in more “sensible” groups now and it’s no big deal. Taking a 6spd today.
plonz is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 07:49 AM
  #11  
beicster 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Berea, KY
Posts: 571
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 146 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by mountaindave View Post
But I still canít bring myself to set a bike up with 10s. (9s is just out of the question because it feels like a red-headed step child.)
.
As a red-headed step child who rides a 9 speed bike, I just want to add that we aren't all that bad.
__________________
Andy
beicster is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 08:38 AM
  #12  
ryansu 
Ride.Smile.Repeat
 
ryansu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 1,774

Bikes: 2009 Handsome Devil, 1978 Motobecane Grand Touring, 1987 Nishiki Cresta GT, Former bikes; 1986 Miyata Trail Runner, 1979 Miyata 912, 2011 VO Rando, 1999 Cannondale R800, 2012 Soma Smoothie, 1986 Schwinn Passage

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 463 Post(s)
Liked 40 Times in 33 Posts
I hear 8 is great... I have a 5, 6 and a couple sevens and one red headed step child -which is set up as a 1x9, but no 8s
ryansu is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 08:47 AM
  #13  
Chrome Molly 
Senior Member
 
Chrome Molly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Forksbent, MN
Posts: 3,277

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 296 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I rode 8 for years and the fact that Campy 10s brifters shifted Shimano rear derailleurs (of a not too distant era) across an 8s Shimano cassette kept me in 8s a long while. Eventually I just moved straight into 10/11 speed systems as my climbing gear and 16t cog needs became a solid preference as I got older.

If I lived where the hills were mild, I might have never left 8s. A few bikes in the fleet are still 8s systems, so even now the upgrade benefit is something I view as marginal.
Chrome Molly is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 08:57 AM
  #14  
shuru421
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 641
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 240 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
All Ill ever need is 8 speeds. The teeth count is more important if you're looking to achieve greater speeds (52/13 etc..). In my opinion, more gears would be more helpful when climbing but thats about it. Something I learned from my 'road to higher gears' quest.
shuru421 is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 09:07 AM
  #15  
Narhay
Senior Member
 
Narhay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Toronto, ON, Canada
Posts: 2,737
Mentioned: 91 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 555 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
10 and 11 speed groups are great. My 5 speed cluster leaves something to be desired in terms of gearing gaps.
Narhay is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 09:10 AM
  #16  
Homebrew01
Super Moderator
 
Homebrew01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Ffld Cnty Connecticut
Posts: 21,048

Bikes: Old Steelies I made, Old Cannondales

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 798 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 30 Times in 22 Posts
I use all 10, but hardly ever in the big ring. By the time I shift into the big ring, another small hill is approaching.
__________________
Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike.

FYI: http://www.bikeforums.net/forum-sugg...ad-please.html
Homebrew01 is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 09:20 AM
  #17  
seamuis
aire dŪthrub
 
seamuis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: chatham
Posts: 529

Bikes: Raleigh Competition, Pashley Roadster Sovereign, Cielo Sportif Classic, Mercian Vincitore Speciale

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 241 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 32 Times in 21 Posts
Iíve always been of the opinion that a 10spd is best as a 1x, which of course makes it a proper 10spd. My road bike is set up this way. 53x11-36. I use a non pinned/ramped shimano SG chainring (DA 7400 crank) and an Deore XT 10spd mtb cassette. I run a DA 7700 rear derailleur with a Wolftooth Ďroadlinkí, mated to a DA 7900 indexed downtube lever. Works a treat, not counting the forever frustration of cable actuated indexed shifting. I think 10spd is great, especially if you think outside the box on how to utilise it. But as others have already stated, itís really down to the individual rider as to what works best for them. If 8spd works great for you, then there is no worthwhile reason to waste any time worrying about anything more.

Iím reminded of a casual friend of mine when I lived in the UK (north west London, more specifically) who was someone Iíd call a Ďsuper commuterí. (I mean the guy was literally riding on solid rubber ĎTannusí tires, so I think itís an apt title) He had a triple up front (I donít recall the specific numbers, but Iím sure the largest was less than 48t) an 11-40 11speed cassette mated to a sturmey-archer 3spd cassette hub, giving him 99 speeds. He proudly boasted that there wasnít a mountain anywhere he couldnít climb and heíd never even have to get out of the saddle. North London is pretty hilly, but not that hilly. It worked for him though. So if you think 10 or 20 is excessive, just think that there are people plodding along with 99! Letís not talk about cvtís though because thatís a rite can of worms there.

Last edited by seamuis; 09-29-18 at 09:28 AM.
seamuis is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 09:42 AM
  #18  
dddd
Ride, Wrench, Swap, Race
 
dddd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Northern California
Posts: 6,526

Bikes: Cheltenham-Pederson racer, Boulder F/S Paris-Roubaix, Varsity racer, '52 Christophe, '62 Continental, '92 Merckx, '75 Limongi, '76 Presto, '72 Gitane SC, '71 Schwinn SS, etc.

Mentioned: 78 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 535 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 19 Times in 19 Posts
Originally Posted by Narhay View Post
10 and 11 speed groups are great. My 5 speed cluster leaves something to be desired in terms of gearing gaps.
I had also found that to be true over the years, yet I at times wanted to keep an old ten-speed only ten speeds.

Finally I put a nice (bought-used) Phil-hubbed wheelset into service on one of those bikes, so first tried to fit an Ultra-6 freewheel, but it didn't have close to enough space for the U-6 freewheel. So noting that the bike's crankset had a large 52-36t spread, I decided to build up a reasonably "tight" 5s freewheel, 13-15-17-20-24t, which would give me the exact same low gear as my "usual" 42-28t.

The only hitch to this setup was having to learn to quickly make a double-shift whenever I changed between chainrings, so the resulting shift sequence would give seven evenly-spaced sequential ratios that top out at 52-13t.
But I never find this setup lacking, especially since the Simplex Prestige shifting performance is so snappy.

Each # of speeds on the rear wheel can give good results in most cases with just a little compromise. I've even used four-speed blocks but so often these are on bikes with half-step chainrings, so hills have to be attacked at speed!

A lot of the old bikes I ride (before selling) end up with a 13-28t, 6s freewheel, and fortunately the Uniglide freewheels in this size are plentiful at the co-ops and on cheap parts-bike acquisitions.

Here's my favorite ten-speed setup:

Last edited by dddd; 09-29-18 at 09:48 AM.
dddd is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 09:44 AM
  #19  
gugie 
Crapmaster Emeritus
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 7,358

Bikes: JP Weigle'd Raleigh Competition reconstruct, 73 Raleigh Competition 650b'ed, 96 Bike Friday NWT, 83 Lotus Classique, 78 Centurion ProTour, 73 Raleigh Grand Sports

Mentioned: 775 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2216 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 42 Times in 34 Posts
Simple for me, 8-speed chains are cheaper. I get why you want/need tightly spaced gearing in a paceline. There's that perfect cadence where optimal power output and smoothness of your pedal stroke that you need to keep. I very rarely ride like that anymore.
__________________
If someone tells you that you have enough bicycles and you don't need any more, stop talking to them. You don't need that kind of negativity in your life.
gugie is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 10:13 AM
  #20  
repechage
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 13,341
Mentioned: 77 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 936 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 11 Posts
I only have one bike with 8 cogs in back.
Almost all the others 5, a few 6, one 7.
Riders today shift too much.
repechage is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 10:18 AM
  #21  
nesteel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Midwest
Posts: 1,806

Bikes: See the signature....

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 395 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 4 Posts
10 speed should be considered the red headed stepchild. I love 9speed of both flavors. I've tried 10 speed from both, and frankly just don't like it. Three of my rides are equipped with campy 9 and I have enough parts to equip a fourth. Too me, it really is the sweet spot of gearing, in regards to modern stuff anyway.
nesteel is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 11:05 AM
  #22  
RiddleOfSteel
Lugged, Dura-Ace Glory
 
RiddleOfSteel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 2,518

Bikes: '87 Schwinn Prologue - '74 Schwinn Paramount P15 - '8X Davidson Impulse - '88 Land Shark Road Shark - '92 Specialized Epic Carbon - '15 Cannondale CAAD10 Disc - '81 Trek 710 - '92? Bushnell Track Bike

Mentioned: 153 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 797 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 27 Times in 23 Posts
I understand and very much appreciate a well-spaced 7-speed or 8-speed cassette and have them on a few bikes. A good 12-28T / 13-28T cogset out back gives me the desired low gear (28T) for the numerous steep hills around here, the spacing allows me to find a good cadence when on the mostly-flats (knees are happy, too), and a 12T gives me a top end gear for going down said steep hills and not spinning out within the first 100 ft.

That being said, 10-speed can give you an 11-28T range with plenty of nicely spaced cogs in the middle of those high/low extremes. I've been working on keeping a good cadence and not grinding it out when I don't need to. Between that, some stretching, and knee warmers, my human drivetrain has been very happy and I seem to have gained power when it comes to the occasional "leaning into the gear" a bit (for short times). 9-speed is nearly the same. I should mention that 99% of my cycling happens on the road with cars, in the city, so when the many gears are combined with a racy frame, strong brakes, and zoo of cars and stoplights, I have all speed tools at my disposal and lack essentially nothing.

It seems that as we've progressed in cog counts for road bikes, the general gear range capability of cassettes is wider. 8-speed: 13-26 9-speed: 12-27 10-speed: 11-28. Obviously, there are multiple combos offered in those speed ranges that are outside those bounds, but this is in general!

Campagnolo is really good at offering tight cog spacing so you can perfectly tune your cadence if you like. A 13-26T 9-speed cassette is a wonderful thing to shift, even if it doesn't get you the lowest low end and the highest high end like Shimano would. But hey, that's what triples are for! Campy was reluctant on that front. 9-speed Ergos have a great shift clarity. 10-speed requires a slightly more delicate touch, but the shifting is still nice.

Just installed 10s bar-end shifters (Shimano) on my Paramount Touring bike. You will not regret doing that! If your commuting or casual riding don't involve hectic scenarios, and you have the low gears for the hills you need to conquer, then keeping going with 8-speed is just fine. 8-speed is very robust and robust feeling. The chains are cheap, too. Ride what you like, but don't be worried about 10-speed's longevity. It's proven itself for some time.
RiddleOfSteel is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 12:02 PM
  #23  
rccardr 
aka: Dr. Cannondale
 
rccardr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,308

Bikes: I'd rather not count how many, thank you

Mentioned: 146 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1008 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 11 Posts
I tend to see gearing as a "6 plus" conversation.

On my 6 speed bikes, I use a 14-16-18-21-24-28 freewheel with a 52/42 or 53/39 crankset. Ones with a 50/34 crankset get a 13-15-17-21-24-28 freewheel. The most used combinations are either 52 (or 53)/18 and 21, or 50/17 and 21. The 30-ish to 100-ish gear inch range gets me up all of the local hills and is good for some group rides as well.

On my 7 speed bikes, I use that gearing PLUS a 12 tooth smallest cog. Both of them have 50/34 cranksets, so these bikes are used on local rides with some hills but a lot of flats, rollers and false flats. Think group rides with pace lines.

8 speed bikes get either the standard gearing PLUS a 34 tooth bailout cog (so 12-14-16-18-21-24-28-34) matched with a 50/34 crankset for big hills (think Thunder Ridge, Dairyland Dare, Skyline Drive), or standard gearing PLUS a middle gear for crusing (12-14-16-17-18-21-24-28).

I LOVE 9 speed stuff. DA 7700 was my introduction to Dura Ace and is also on the bike in my collection I've owned the longest, an early 80's Merckx with STI's. Gearing on that one is still standard with a compact as noted above, but PLUS both a low 12 tooth cog and an extra extra middle range cog, so 12-14-16-17-18--19- 21-24-28. Super paceline bike, awesome for event riding, really lets you maintain speed in the rollers (but not geared for super long or super big hills). Have a Zunow set up the same way but with down tube shifting. Alternatively, the Pelizzoli uses the standard gearing PLUS the middle cruising gear, PLUS a 34 bailout, so 12-14-16-17-18-21-24-28-34 matched with a 50/34 crankset. Makes it an excellent big hill rider, but even better when equipped with a 48/36/24 triple (same crank, different ringset, different BB). Think Eroica or Cino.

Only have one ten speed bike, Schwinderella, which is 650b set up with a 48/36/24 triple for hilly gravel rides (again, Eroica, Cino or VA area gravel events). Only difference between that and the Pel is the addition of a 13 tooth cog for downhill running, as I like to keep the pedals moving on downhill gravel, so 12-13-14-16-17-18-21-24-28-34. That gives me optimum gearing for those steep downhills, the long coastal run with a small group, and also the gearing for those loooooong steep gravel hills.

Hope this all makes sense!


__________________
Hard at work in the Secret Underground Laboratory...

Last edited by rccardr; 09-29-18 at 12:07 PM.
rccardr is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 12:39 PM
  #24  
repechage
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 13,341
Mentioned: 77 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 936 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 11 Posts
On the flats I spend much time in a 42x17 or 40x16. Just Spin baby.
Always smile when I come up to a mod bike guy in a 53 x (your choice- middle of the cassette downward)
repechage is offline  
Old 09-29-18, 01:01 PM
  #25  
ThermionicScott 
hungry
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 18,490

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers)

Mentioned: 68 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2028 Post(s)
Liked 97 Times in 80 Posts
Originally Posted by mountaindave View Post
I have a number of bikes that I have built with 8s drivetrains that are 8/9/10 compatible (none with brifters at the moment, but I have two sets of Sachs ergos waiting...). I have even bought two sets of 10s bar end shifters (don’t ask me why... but then most people here probably aren’t phased by that) and a 10s cassette. But I still can’t bring myself to set a bike up with 10s. (9s is just out of the question because it feels like a red-headed step child.)

Maybe it’s becasue 8s just works. I can build wonderful cassette combos that don’t seem to be “lacking.” The chains I buy are backward compatible with all my 7s, 6s and 5s bikes.

Perhaps I am afraid of 10s chains and their chainring differences. Perhaps I am stuck in the early 90’s (formative high school days).

I just can’t get past 8.

I can't seem to get past 7 speeds, myself.

Wider range and closer spacing have obvious riding benefits, and more cogs allow for more pleasing progressions of ratios. (For example, a 7-speed 13-26 cassette or freewheel puts the biggest jump between the two smallest cogs, which is generally where you want the smallest jumps. An 8-speed or higher puts a 14T in between, fixing that situation.) So I ought to be all about upgrading whenever more speeds are available!

But my first road bike was 7-speed, and I covered enough ground on that thing to learn how to make do with the ratios available to me. As I explored different combinations of chainrings and cassettes on my bikes, I've found setups that rarely left me wanting anything more. Indeed, I find myself double-shifting a lot on the bike with a 13-21T cassette, and sometimes that's annoying. Sadly, Shimano seems to have discontinued all but their lowest-tier 7-speed parts, but I acquired some spare hubs and cassettes a few years ago, and since it never wears out, it'll take a long time before I'm confronted with a need to change anything.

There's probably some "imprinting" at work, too.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498

Last edited by ThermionicScott; 09-29-18 at 01:12 PM.
ThermionicScott is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.