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Peugeot UO-8 Build

Old 10-18-18, 10:59 AM
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pumabicycle
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Peugeot UO-8 Build

In a fit of senselessness I bought two Peugeot UO-8s. I dismantled one, stripped the paint and laid down some primer. Original owner told me both are 1972. I sold a vintage Porsche and it was a bit of a heartbreaker so building a bike thatís reminiscent of the car and color scheme will ease my pain.

Thereís something I like about this bike. Iím thinking to rebuild with some modern components and some vintage. Itís likely not profitable to build up with excellent components and sell. Iím a bit short on space even though Iíd like to keep it. Iíve heard great things about these frames.

help me decide what to do?

I have questions about part interchangeability if building up is practical? Is this a stupid idea?

What Iíd like to do:

Just keep frame and fork, repaint slate grey, lugs red.
Vintage campy strada crank
modern campy chain
Modern chorus rear derailleur, no front
11 speed cassette
mavic OP tubular 32/32 700s
hubs?
vintage campy aero seat post
modern Chorus Brifters
modern cabling

I've no idea if vintage strada crank will work with modern campy chain and chorus derailleur?

Will strada crank mount to original bottom bracket? Velo orange bracket? Or should/can I have bottom bracket re-tapped to Italian standard?

Will Mafac Racer brakes reach 700 wheels?

Probably too many questions, sorry. Thanks for your help. All the advice I can get is appreciated.

-PB




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Old 10-18-18, 11:32 AM
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Here is what I suggest:

- Start reading here: https://www.sheldonbrown.com/velos.html. Sheldon Brownís site is the first stop for anyone interested in old bikes.
- Consider a tear down and rebuild to original specifications. What you learn will help you decide what to do next.

A modern build plan like yours is likely to be frustrating with a UO-8 unless you know enough to be very deliberate about the compatibility issues you will encounter. UO-8s are really good bikes and are worthy of some upgrades, but as you read, research, and rebuild, youíll understand what people tend to do with these to make them better than original.

A modern build like you laid out is certainly possible with this bike, but prepping the frame to accept these changes may be a more involved process than you want to tackle.

Last edited by noobinsf; 10-18-18 at 11:35 AM.
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Old 10-18-18, 11:41 AM
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Thanks for replying

Iíve read every page of Sheldon's site. I did this same idea with a 1983 Puch a few years ago. The bike turned out well but the frame probably wasnít the best starting point. I spread the rear dropouts built the bike spokes up with with good results.

Im guessing the Peugeot is a better frame from a handling perspective but Iíve never ridden one so Iím not sure.

It has been a while since I read Sheldonís site. I donít recall if he mentions vintage crank/modern chain compatibility? Iíll check.
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Old 10-18-18, 11:45 AM
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Honestly I would do a lot less than you are suggesting. It is a fine frame if a bit heavy.

First, I'd avoid repainting unless necessary. The original paint job is good quality and it is part of what makes that a special bike.

Second, the mafac racers should reach to 700c wheels.

Third, I'd consider putting in a cotterless crank (but you'll need a French bottom bracket) and certainly alloy wheels. The bike came with a 5 speed (120 mm) rear but the rear triangle is easy peasy to spread to 126. Velo mine sells cheap good quality alloy wheels built around Sun CR 18 rims.

Fourth, I'd get rid of the simplex derailleur and run suntour.

It is classic bike and a good one. If you spruce it up, it will ride very, very well.
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Old 10-18-18, 12:53 PM
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Been there ... done that ... love my UO8, which is my go-to transportation beater.

1. aluminum rims -- essential
2. KoolStop brake pads -- likewise
3. road quill pedals with toeclips and straps (or modern clipless system, if you already use one on your other bikes -- I don't happen to)
4. SunTour derailleurs
5. 6-speed or 7-speed freewheel
6. aluminum crankset -- I was fortunate to find French-thread Sugino cups
7. better shift levers -- I use SunTour ratchet barcons
8. shorter reach brake levers (I can panic-grab my trusty old Weinmanns far faster and more securely than any Mafac or Modolo or Campagnolo lever I have tried -- function of finger length/strength)
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Old 10-18-18, 01:49 PM
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Thanks for the great replies!

I searched Sheldonís site for an answer regarding chain to no avail.

I may do a less expensive build. Iím teetering. I have money to spend on it but I should probably be conservative.

In measuring the seat post I came up with 25.5. Well first I measured 26.0 but realized I was spreading the tube a bit. (Has slit cut into it that widens with pressure). So not exactly certain on sizing.

It was neccesary to paint. There were some minor rust spots that needed to be addressed. I wanted to paint slate grey like my old car.

I could also do a single speed. I havenít ridden one since my BMX days. Thereís quite a few hills Ďround these parts so that might be a problem. Decisions, decisions. Probably best to have rear derailleur.

If I go 11 speed what width would I need to spread frame?
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Old 10-18-18, 02:45 PM
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The seat post on my AO-8 was also 25.5 mm. Get a 25.4 mm post and shim it with a slice of pop can, or get a 25.6 mm post and sand it down.

As others have said those old Peugeots are great bikes to ride. Put on good wheels and tires, first off! Then decide what else you might want to play with. If you decide to go with a modern Campagnolo ten speed, you’ll need to spread the rear triangle to 130 mm. For my bike, I chose instead to go with a Spťcialitťs TA Cyclotouriste triple crank, Huret DuoPar rear derailleur, Nuovo Record front. It works a treat.


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Old 10-18-18, 02:56 PM
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Thatís beautiful and really useful. Great job!
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Old 10-18-18, 03:36 PM
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Why the need for 11 speeds? One of the nice things with a UO-8 is it has 18 inch chainstays. Like two inches longer than on racing bikes. I always found that all five of my cogs were a good chainline with either chainring. Do you need more than 10 speeds?

So rather than updating, why not backdating it. Source a nice Stronglight cottered crank from the 60's. Maybe Campy Record or Gran Sport derailleurs. Tubular wheels. Ideale or other funky french saddle. Just my two cents.
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Old 10-18-18, 04:41 PM
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If I may suggest clean it up, build it on the cheap and RIDE it before you go crazy with upgrades and as you ride think about:
  • Do I like how this bike rides?
  • Does this bike fit me?
  • When I'm done with the ride do I have a big dumb grin on my face?
  • Nothing worse than sinking time and $$ into a bike that you find out doesn't really fit, ask me how I know
As has been mentioned you can upgrade a UO-8 but there are hurdles to navigate and as for going full modern with a vintage frame I would say maybe not on a U0-8, not a knock on UO-8s which I happen to like but there are better places to start (there is a thread around somewhere about retro mods). YMMV

One word of warning the downtube shifters on the UO-8 have a very unique set up so beware of that it, maybe the easiest option for upgrade to update the plastic simplex to a nicer metal simplex (photo below) which can be found on ebay, failing that would be Suntour Bar cons option mentioned above. At the very least keep the original parts to use or adapt.




shifter boss on only one side


metal Shifter parts like the UO-10 had

Last edited by ryansu; 10-18-18 at 04:45 PM.
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Old 10-18-18, 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by big chainring View Post
Why the need for 11 speeds? One of the nice things with a UO-8 is it has 18 inch chainstays. Like two inches longer than on racing bikes. I always found that all five of my cogs were a good chainline with either chainring. Do you need more than 10 speeds?

So rather than updating, why not backdating it. Source a nice Stronglight cottered crank from the 60's. Maybe Campy Record or Gran Sport derailleurs. Tubular wheels. Ideale or other funky french saddle. Just my two cents.
I just thought eleven speeds would be nice considering I donít want a front derailleur. It isnít necessary.

I do want a vintage crank. Mostly because I really love the look of the super record strands crank. I just need to know if itís compatible?

My preference is definitely for Campagnolo. I tried it once and now Iím hooked. I also prefer tubular wheels.

I looked at a Berthoud saddle because theyíre decidedly funky. If theyíll make me a red one Iíd do it. But they are pricey.
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Old 10-18-18, 05:05 PM
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Originally Posted by ryansu View Post
If I may suggest clean it up, build it on the cheap and RIDE it before you go crazy with upgrades and as you ride think about:
  • Do I like how this bike rides?
  • Does this bike fit me?
  • When I'm done with the ride do I have a big dumb grin on my face?
  • Nothing worse than sinking time and $$ into a bike that you find out doesn't really fit, ask me how I know
As has been mentioned you can upgrade a UO-8 but there are hurdles to navigate and as for going full modern with a vintage frame I would say maybe not on a U0-8, not a knock on UO-8s which I happen to like but there are better places to start (there is a thread around somewhere about retro mods). YMMV

One word of warning the downtube shifters on the UO-8 have a very unique set up so beware of that it, maybe the easiest option for upgrade to update the plastic simplex to a nicer metal simplex (photo below) which can be found on ebay, failing that would be Suntour Bar cons option mentioned above. At the very least keep the original parts to use or adapt.




shifter boss on only one side


metal Shifter parts like the UO-10 had
this is a good, practical suggestion. I could spend a small amount turning it into a single speed and new saddle. Ride around for a while and see how I like it. Truth be told Iíve always wanted a vintage Italian bike of note but donít know enough about them to know what is good and what is worth it. The prices I see are high for vintage Framesets. Iíll check the thread you mentioned. Thank you!
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Old 10-19-18, 12:23 PM
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Yes you can keep the brakes, and they are the best components on the bike. They will fit with 700c wheels.
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Old 10-19-18, 01:52 PM
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I would not try to convert one of these bikes to an 11 speed rear. It would be imo, a ton of work and probably not ever really work 100%. I agree with the suggestion to RIDE IT FIRST before changing anything, to make sure it fits and you like the ride.
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Old 10-19-18, 02:14 PM
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Originally Posted by exmechanic89 View Post
I would not try to convert one of these bikes to an 11 speed rear. It would be imo, a ton of work and probably not ever really work 100%. I agree with the suggestion to RIDE IT FIRST before changing anything, to make sure it fits and you like the ride.
True. A 6- or 7-speed conversion will get you most of the 11-speed benefit with a lot less work and uncertainty, not to mention expense.
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Old 10-19-18, 02:18 PM
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Originally Posted by pumabicycle View Post
In a fit of senselessness I bought two Peugeot UO-8s. I dismantled one, stripped the paint and laid down some primer. Original owner told me both are 1972. I sold a vintage Porsche and it was a bit of a heartbreaker so building a bike thatís reminiscent of the car and color scheme will ease my pain.

Thereís something I like about this bike. Iím thinking to rebuild with some modern components and some vintage. Itís likely not profitable to build up with excellent components and sell. Iím a bit short on space even though Iíd like to keep it. Iíve heard great things about these frames.

help me decide what to do?

I have questions about part interchangeability if building up is practical? Is this a stupid idea?

What Iíd like to do:

Just keep frame and fork, repaint slate grey, lugs red.
Vintage campy strada crank
modern campy chain
Modern chorus rear derailleur, no front
11 speed cassette That will be a big stretch. The bike is (or at least was) 120 spaced. Shouldn't bother the very mild UO-8 stays but Peugeot never dreamed anybody would ever do that.
mavic OP tubular 32/32 700s I have memories of many thousands of miles on a sewup'd UO-8
hubs?
vintage campy aero seat post Size? I'm guessing you cannot get the narrow French post from Campy.
modern Chorus Brifters
modern cabling

I've no idea if vintage strada crank will work with modern campy chain and chorus derailleur? Can you get a French threaed BB to work with that crank?

Will strada crank mount to original bottom bracket? Velo orange bracket? Or should/can I have bottom bracket re-tapped to Italian standard?

Will Mafac Racer brakes reach 700 wheels? Yes, with no issues. See above.

Probably too many questions, sorry. Thanks for your help. All the advice I can get is appreciated.

-PB
My thoughts in red.

Ben
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Old 10-19-18, 04:00 PM
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Thanks for all the response. Iím learning that these French bikes are problematic for what Iíd like to do.

I did figure out that the most cassette i can I can get to work with strada crank is an eight speed. As suggested above this might be a bit much for the frame. I donít know if I can get strada crank to fit bottom bracket? Thereís so much unknown to me here.

So likely best best bet is to build a single speed. I do already have a geared bike that serves me well. Iíve always wanted to build a 20 spoke wheel for a particular spoke pattern so Iíll see if I can find some 20 hole tubular rims and hubs.

I painted the frame and frankly I went too heavy with the primer and should probably strip it again and start over.

Thanks again.
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Old 10-19-18, 05:54 PM
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This U08 has experienced numerous changes, modifications and updates/upgrades since I came to possess the beat up bike minus a wheelset. The only original parts are the frame, fork and headset. Otherwise everything was changed to fit my specs and taste. Stronglight Impact compact 50/34 crank, inexpensive Weinmann alloy wheelset, a newer with alloy bars, an alloy seatport (25.4mm) as @Aubergine mentioned and everything else in between. I love this bike and it is my daily workhorse logging over 8K urban miles in the past 3 years. I also went with a 6 speed freewheel and find it completely satisfactory. It is up to you but in my eyes an 11 speed upgrade might not be what you need...


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Old 10-19-18, 07:08 PM
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They make a fun fixed ride.
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Old 10-20-18, 01:56 AM
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Originally Posted by pumabicycle View Post
Thanks for all the response. Iím learning that these French bikes are problematic for what Iíd like to do.

I did figure out that the most cassette i can I can get to work with strada crank is an eight speed. As suggested above this might be a bit much for the frame. I donít know if I can get strada crank to fit bottom bracket? Thereís so much unknown to me here.
Ok, here are some more answers.

The Campagnolo NR and SR cranks work fine with ten speed cassettes. I know because I upgraded three 1980 era bikes from Campy NR and SR groups to take ten-speed cassettes and rear derailleurs. You can easily get a Campy-compatible French bottom bracket from Phil Wood or Velo Orange. I recommend the Phil, which will be more versatile in setting the chain line. (And for various reasons, I have had niggling problems trying to get the VO BBs to work to my satisfaction.)

IMO you would have no problems cold-setting the Peugeot frame to 130 mm. Just make sure you also tweak the dropouts so that they are parallel after the stays have been spread.

The difficulties of setting up old French bikes are overrated. There are solutions to all of the supposed difficulties, and all you need to do is ask.
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Old 10-21-18, 10:29 AM
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My concern here would be the use of such narrow chain on any vintage crankset.

Depending to some degree on the tooth counts of the two chainrings and other factors, I have had even 8sp chain give difficulties with Nuovo Record cranksets in certain instances, where I then had to remove the small chainring and bend each tooth a half-millimeter toward the big chainring using an adjustable wrench. This was even much more of an issue with classic Stronglight 93 and SR APEX cranksets.

So not a major problem in other words, and with the option to fine-tune the effective chainring spacing later (simply by holding a long file against the tips of the small chainring's teeth so as to apply a bevel to one side or the other of the tips of the teeth).
The challenge here is to have one's hand and arm out of the way of the rotating crankarms while holding the file (which I stand on end on a small block of wood, for stability).

I actually use this sort of "chainring tuning" on any bike that tends to have the chain either falling inward off the small chainring during a downshift, or where the chain "skates" atop the small ring's teeth (while possibly trying to wedge between the two chainrings).
Used chainrings are rarely perfect (they have a bit of lateral runout, and individual teeth may have deformed tips).
Using the file against the rotating chainring can make for more reliable engagement of the chain falling onto the teeth of the small chainring by keeping the tips of all of the teeth consistently in the right position.

Showing here how the file against a rotating crank can be positioned to bevel each side of the small chainring's teeth.




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