Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Something weird happened to the gold Sedisport chain I just bought.....

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Something weird happened to the gold Sedisport chain I just bought.....

Old 11-04-18, 09:52 PM
  #1  
Chombi1 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Chombi1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 2,765
Mentioned: 89 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 971 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Something weird happened to the gold Sedisport chain I just bought.....

So I just got this NOS gold colored Sedisport chain recently (First one I ever bought. Usually get silver Sedis chains for my bikes) and I decided to give it my usual cleanup before I install it on one of my builds. Used some mineral WD40 to clean off the old factory grease on it.
It was looking OK when I started and I did notice it was a nice bright gold color, when it was wet with WD40 on it, but after a few passes with a brush and more WD40 sprayed on it, I noticed that the gold color is suddenly gone from the chain, and now it is more of a buff sillver/ nickel color...... Did Sedis just coat these chains with a gold colored varnish and I melted and brushed it off while I was cleaning it??
I would have thought that the gold color was coming from some sort of alloy on the metal or something deposited on the steel surface chemocally/electronically, but I guess I must be wrong....
Don't think the seller misrepresented the chain at all, but maybe that's just how they did gold colored chains?
Chombi1 is offline  
Old 11-05-18, 02:27 AM
  #2  
verktyg 
verktyg
 
verktyg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 2,892

Bikes: Current favorites: 1988 Peugeot Birraritz, 1984 Gitane Super Corsa, 1981 Bianchi Campione Del Mondo, 1992 Paramount OS, 1990 Bianchi Mondiale, 1988 Colnago Technos, 1985 RalieghUSA Team Pro, 1973 Holdsworth

Mentioned: 127 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 502 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 21 Times in 19 Posts
You put in on backwards.....

I always wondered how they got the gold color on those chains as well, Regina Oro and Shimano Uniglide chains too.

Always thought that because brass is an alloy of copper and zinc it wouldn't plate. Not so. It can be done and that's probably the way the chain side plates are "gold plated". FW sprockets too.

You're probably right about a protective coating which was probably dissolved by the solvent in WD40.

verktyg
__________________
Things aren't always what they seem... Don't believe everything you think!

Chas. ;-)
verktyg is offline  
Old 11-05-18, 05:07 AM
  #3  
The Golden Boy 
Extraordinary Magnitude
 
The Golden Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Waukesha WI
Posts: 11,362

Bikes: 1977 Trek TX700; 1978/79 Trek 736; 1984 Specialized Stumpjumper Sport; 1984 Schwinn Voyageur SP; 1985 Trek 620; 1985 Trek 720; 1986 Trek 400 Elance; 1987 Schwinn High Sierra; 1990 Miyata 1000LT

Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1713 Post(s)
Liked 45 Times in 35 Posts
I hope you at least got a pic of the bike with the gold chain on it!!!
__________________
*Recipient of the 2006 Time Magazine "Person Of The Year" Award*

Commence to jigglin’ huh?!?!

"But hey, always love to hear from opinionated amateurs." -says some guy to Mr. Marshall.
The Golden Boy is offline  
Old 11-05-18, 05:13 AM
  #4  
pastorbobnlnh 
Freewheel Medic
 
pastorbobnlnh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Ascending or Descending the NH Mountains NW of Concord!
Posts: 11,181

Bikes: Snazzy* Schwinns, Classy Cannondales, & a Lonely '83 Santana Tandem (* Ed.)

Mentioned: 84 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 463 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 9 Posts
Gold Suntour ProCompe/Perfect sprockets can do the same thing. The "gold" is more like a thin film wash and with the wrong degreasing solution, it will disappear into the solution you are using. Sorry for your loss!
__________________
Bob
Dreaming about riding in NH's summertime!

Visit my websites:
FreeWheelSpa.com orpastorbobnlnh.com
pastorbobnlnh is offline  
Old 11-05-18, 09:48 AM
  #5  
cdmurphy 
Senior Member
 
cdmurphy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: San Marcos, CA
Posts: 555

Bikes: Too many, but sometimes not enough.

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by verktyg View Post
You put in on backwards.....

I always wondered how they got the gold color on those chains as well, Regina Oro and Shimano Uniglide chains too.

Always thought that because brass is an alloy of copper and zinc it wouldn't plate. Not so. It can be done and that's probably the way the chain side plates are "gold plated". FW sprockets too.

You're probably right about a protective coating which was probably dissolved by the solvent in WD40.

verktyg
I assumed the "oro" chains and cogs were a thin coating of Titanium Nitride. (I'm pretty sure that is what KMC does for their current gold chains.) I don't know what sort of surface prep is required, but I can imagine a poorly prepped surface might lead to the film floating over oils or grease, letting it be washed off with solvent.
cdmurphy is offline  
Old 11-05-18, 10:02 AM
  #6  
Salamandrine 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 4,891

Bikes: 78 Masi Criterium, 68 PX10, 2016 Mercian King of Mercia, Rivendell Clem Smith Jr

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1718 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 36 Times in 24 Posts
I'm pretty sure that Regina Oro chains and freewheels were brass plated. Not absolutely sure though. They tended to tarnish just sitting around the shop. IIRC there was some advertising copy at some point describing it. It's a very different look compared to a gold KMC chain.
Salamandrine is offline  
Old 11-05-18, 10:16 AM
  #7  
Chombi1 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Chombi1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 2,765
Mentioned: 89 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 971 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
I even asked everyone in my house to look at the chain to confirm that it did indeed turned all silver on me, lest my eyes are deceiving me, and everyone did....
oh well, I did not buy it for much money anyway, and I always preferred silver Sedis chains. Just a bit puzzled why Sedis did not do a better job on their gold colored chains, being that they had a pretty good reputation back then.....
Oh well,....C'est la Vie!...
Chombi1 is offline  
Old 11-05-18, 12:41 PM
  #8  
Drillium Dude 
NNNN
 
Drillium Dude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Bothell, WA
Posts: 9,247

Bikes: 1973 Colnago Super, 1973 Colnago Super concept, 1979 Medici Pro Strada, 1979 Dennis Sparrow, 1980 Alpina, 1983 Colnago Mexico, 1985 Casati Perfection, 1985 Somec Super Corsa, 2002 Bill Davidson custom

Mentioned: 160 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 971 Post(s)
Liked 27 Times in 18 Posts
Ah, but it'll be black soon enough

DD
__________________
My Flickr pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/30331021@N08/

Drillium Dude is offline  
Old 11-05-18, 02:26 PM
  #9  
Bikerider007 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: AZ
Posts: 2,376

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 432 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
I had a similar incident with a gold chainring recently. I sprayed degreaser on it, wiped and noticed it had reduced the color a fair amount.
__________________
Bikerider007 is offline  
Old 11-06-18, 05:13 AM
  #10  
verktyg 
verktyg
 
verktyg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 2,892

Bikes: Current favorites: 1988 Peugeot Birraritz, 1984 Gitane Super Corsa, 1981 Bianchi Campione Del Mondo, 1992 Paramount OS, 1990 Bianchi Mondiale, 1988 Colnago Technos, 1985 RalieghUSA Team Pro, 1973 Holdsworth

Mentioned: 127 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 502 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 21 Times in 19 Posts
Gold "Plating

Originally Posted by cdmurphy View Post
I assumed the "oro" chains and cogs were a thin coating of Titanium Nitride. (I'm pretty sure that is what KMC does for their current gold chains.) I don't know what sort of surface prep is required, but I can imagine a poorly prepped surface might lead to the film floating over oils or grease, letting it be washed off with solvent.
There are several processes used for Titanium Nitride (TiN) coatings. The oldest method, CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) is applied in a vacuum chamber at ~1925° F (~1050 C°). CVD TiN is most frequently used for Tungsten Carbide metal cutting tools. It came into common use in the 1970s.

PVD (Physical Vapor Deposition) TiN is applied at 400° to 900° F (200 C° to 480 C°). The process was developed in Russia at the University of Moscow. The Russians lacked the means to commercialize the process. Several European companies refined the process and PVD TiN became commercially viable 1980.

The PVD coating process requires surfaces to be chemically cleaned. A pinhead size spec of dirt or grease on a part can contaminate the whole coating chamber and leave splotchy surfaces on everything in it. The chamber needs to be sand blasted to remove the contaminants before it can be reused. Companies that do PVD coatings are very careful with what they put in their chambers. The cost of a basic PVD coating chamber is $250,000! Special pre-cleaning equipment, another $100,000+. That's just to get started.

PVD "coatings" and not just coatings. Ions of the coating material get embedded into the surface and don't rub off. TiN can be harder than Tungsten Carbide and Silicon Carbide, under Diamond.

Today the cost for PVD TiN coating has become a lot more economical. It's very possible that the links on KMC chains are PVD TiN coated.

To change the subject, @Chombi1 is it possible that the "gold" color came from hardened grease on the surface and after you cleaned it up, it turned silver"

I think you just failed your alchemist's test! You're supposed to turn things into gold, not gold into silver!

verktyg
__________________
Things aren't always what they seem... Don't believe everything you think!

Chas. ;-)

Last edited by verktyg; 11-06-18 at 05:22 AM.
verktyg is offline  
Old 11-06-18, 10:25 AM
  #11  
Chombi1 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Chombi1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 2,765
Mentioned: 89 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 971 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Nope, I don't think it was "golden" old grease. You should have seen how nice and gold it looked under the pool of WD40 in my component cleaning tray before the finish disappeared......
Chombi1 is offline  
Old 11-06-18, 10:31 AM
  #12  
Cute Boy Horse
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 613
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 217 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Well the WD40 tells us you wanted the chain ruined anyway. Seems it worked.
Cute Boy Horse is offline  
Old 11-06-18, 11:18 AM
  #13  
Lascauxcaveman 
Senior Member
 
Lascauxcaveman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Port Angeles, WA
Posts: 7,256

Bikes: A green one, "Ragleigh," or something.

Mentioned: 158 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1304 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by Cute Boy Horse View Post
Well the WD40 tells us you wanted the chain ruined anyway...
Because...?
__________________
● 1971 Grandis SL ● 1972 Lambert Grand Prix frankenbike ● 1972 Raleigh Super Course fixie ● 1973 Nishiki Semi-Pro ● 1980 Apollo "Legnano" ● 1981 Miyata 1000 ● 1984 Bianchi Limited ● 1984 Nishiki Landau ● 1984 Peugeot Vagabond ● 1985 Trek 600 ● 1985 Shogun Prairie Breaker ● 1986 Univega Nuovo Sport ● 1986 Merckx Super Corsa ● 1987 Schwinn Tempo ● 1988 Schwinn Voyageur ● 1989 Trek 400 ● 1990 Cannondale ST600 ● 1993 Technium RT600 ● 1996 Kona Lava Dome ● And a Bike to Be Named Later ●
Lascauxcaveman is offline  
Old 11-06-18, 11:48 AM
  #14  
Cassave
Senior Member
 
Cassave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Woodland Hills, Calif.
Posts: 1,655
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I'd guess the "gold" is actually cadmium with a chromate treatment.
In the US the AMS spec is QQ-P-416 Type II. It's an excellent corrosion inhibitor and the chromate solutions can range from
brassy gold to olive drab.
Scrubbing with a solvent can reduce the chromate layer exposing the silvery cadmium base.
Cassave is offline  
Old 11-06-18, 04:42 PM
  #15  
Cute Boy Horse
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 613
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 217 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Lascauxcaveman View Post
Because...?
WD40 is what clueless dads use when they think "how hard can it be?".
Cute Boy Horse is offline  
Old 11-06-18, 07:33 PM
  #16  
Chombi1 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Chombi1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 2,765
Mentioned: 89 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 971 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by Cute Boy Horse View Post
WD40 is what clueless dads use when they think "how hard can it be?".
Obviously, you are just a anti WD40 snob that does not know that much.........
WD40 is just a kerosene based product made more convenient because it's in a spray can , so easy to clean parts with it by blasting it with the spray. Perfect for cleaning chains on motorcycles as the solvent will not harm the O rings on motorcycle chains. That is what I and many other motorcyclists use to clean their chains, that's why I naturally pass on the method to clean my bicycle chains, and have been doing so for many years.
What do you clean your chains with, gasoline??
Chombi1 is offline  
Old 11-06-18, 10:52 PM
  #17  
dwing
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 230
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 79 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Do all the colored chains.. red, blue, etc.. wash away using specific cleaning liquids and lubes? It doesnt seem reasonable gold would be any different from mfg standpoint.
dwing is offline  
Old 11-06-18, 11:12 PM
  #18  
Chombi1 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Chombi1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 2,765
Mentioned: 89 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 971 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by dwing View Post
Do all the colored chains.. red, blue, etc.. wash away using specific cleaning liquids and lubes? It doesnt seem reasonable gold would be any different from mfg standpoint.
Really depends on how the finished/color was applied to the links. A surface coating similar to colored/tinted varnish which I now suspect my chain was finished with) or paint would sure eventually can just wear off and wash off after some use and exposure, but as already noted, there are other ways to color metal that would be more embedded in the surface of the steel of the chain. I think those can still eventually wear or scratch off, but not just after a few scrubbings in solvent.
Chombi1 is offline  
Old 11-06-18, 11:36 PM
  #19  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 41,632

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6838 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 216 Times in 180 Posts
Sedisport was thrown under the Bus, When Sram bought the Fichtel Sachs group,
along with Malliard, etc.
/
Right?
fietsbob is offline  
Old 11-06-18, 11:49 PM
  #20  
Chombi1 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Chombi1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 2,765
Mentioned: 89 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 971 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Sedisport was thrown under the Bus, When Sram bought the Fichtel Sachs group,
along with Malliard, etc.
/
Right?
Sedis actually survived for a few years making chains under the Sachs/Sedis brand name. Lots of 7/8 speed era narrow chains are still available, out there, NOS.
I even had a Sachs/Sedis narrow chain that was sold in Campy packaging. I guess Campy found them to work well with some of their early indexed shifting systems.
Sedis also sold chains for industrial tools and machinery. Not sure if they are still around in that capacity or if Sachs eventually just absorbed them and killed off that subsidiary.
Chombi1 is offline  
Old 11-07-18, 12:51 AM
  #21  
verktyg 
verktyg
 
verktyg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 2,892

Bikes: Current favorites: 1988 Peugeot Birraritz, 1984 Gitane Super Corsa, 1981 Bianchi Campione Del Mondo, 1992 Paramount OS, 1990 Bianchi Mondiale, 1988 Colnago Technos, 1985 RalieghUSA Team Pro, 1973 Holdsworth

Mentioned: 127 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 502 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 21 Times in 19 Posts
Sedis Sport Gold Chain

Originally Posted by Chombi1 View Post
Nope, I don't think it was "golden" old grease. You should have seen how nice and gold it looked under the pool of WD40 in my component cleaning tray before the finish disappeared......
Here ya go Chombi1, Sedis Sport Gold chain on my 1980 Bertin C37bis that I got new 37 years ago. This is the original chain and I haven't ridden this bike that much, maybe less than 1000 miles. It's dirty but it's original dirt... Actually an old picture I took a few years ago to show the Simplex plastic pusher plate.. You can still see gold color on the links. It would look better cleaned up, but it would just get dirty again....



I suspect that the gold color on the side plates was brass plated. It seems like that was the the most economical way to manufacturer them. The biggest problem is fixturing those small parts.

As far as the colored fixiefool chains, I think that the component parts on those chains are coated with an epoxy type paint.

verktyg
__________________
Things aren't always what they seem... Don't believe everything you think!

Chas. ;-)
verktyg is offline  
Old 11-07-18, 01:28 AM
  #22  
Lascauxcaveman 
Senior Member
 
Lascauxcaveman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Port Angeles, WA
Posts: 7,256

Bikes: A green one, "Ragleigh," or something.

Mentioned: 158 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1304 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by Cute Boy Horse View Post
WD40 is what clueless dads use when they think "how hard can it be?".
Yeah. And pretty much every bicycle mechanic (professional and amateur) I've met uses WD40 to good effect for degreasing old components. I haven't met one who's complained about it 'ruining' anything. Except maybe a thin and fragile gold colored finish on a chain. And frankly, that's a new one to me, since I've cleaned up a couple of old gold Uniglide chains with the stuff and those chains are still nice and gold-colored. I'm guessing contact time matter quite a bit here.

If you want to make the point that WD40 is not a very good lubricant, I'll go along with you there, as it evaporates pretty quickly. But for cleaning stuff up before you add the lube; it's pretty hard to beat.
__________________
● 1971 Grandis SL ● 1972 Lambert Grand Prix frankenbike ● 1972 Raleigh Super Course fixie ● 1973 Nishiki Semi-Pro ● 1980 Apollo "Legnano" ● 1981 Miyata 1000 ● 1984 Bianchi Limited ● 1984 Nishiki Landau ● 1984 Peugeot Vagabond ● 1985 Trek 600 ● 1985 Shogun Prairie Breaker ● 1986 Univega Nuovo Sport ● 1986 Merckx Super Corsa ● 1987 Schwinn Tempo ● 1988 Schwinn Voyageur ● 1989 Trek 400 ● 1990 Cannondale ST600 ● 1993 Technium RT600 ● 1996 Kona Lava Dome ● And a Bike to Be Named Later ●
Lascauxcaveman is offline  
Old 11-07-18, 09:12 AM
  #23  
verktyg 
verktyg
 
verktyg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 2,892

Bikes: Current favorites: 1988 Peugeot Birraritz, 1984 Gitane Super Corsa, 1981 Bianchi Campione Del Mondo, 1992 Paramount OS, 1990 Bianchi Mondiale, 1988 Colnago Technos, 1985 RalieghUSA Team Pro, 1973 Holdsworth

Mentioned: 127 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 502 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 21 Times in 19 Posts
Originally Posted by Lascauxcaveman View Post
Yeah. And pretty much every bicycle mechanic (professional and amateur) I've met uses WD40 to good effect for degreasing old components. I haven't met one who's complained about it 'ruining' anything. Except maybe a thin and fragile gold colored finish on a chain. And frankly, that's a new one to me, since I've cleaned up a couple of old gold Uniglide chains with the stuff and those chains are still nice and gold-colored. I'm guessing contact time matter quite a bit here.

If you want to make the point that WD40 is not a very good lubricant, I'll go along with you there, as it evaporates pretty quickly. But for cleaning stuff up before you add the lube; it's pretty hard to beat.
WD40 was developed to displace water in electrical equipment thus WD. Back in the 70's it was supposed to to contain some silicone which is a light duty lube???

In the 70's in New Mexico we used to use WD40 for chain lube. Water was almost never a problem but dust was. Most other lubricants at the time would pick up the fine grit and wear out your chain and sprockets. I applied the stuff before every ride. It helped keep the chains clean too.

Since I was running the shop and we bought Sedis Sport chains on 50 meter and 100 meter wooden spools, I changed my chains every 3000 miles whether they need it or not. They only cost me $3.00 each.

Fortunately I saved the old ones in baggies. I was having some shifting problems with my Ironman with a 7 sp SIS indexing RD. Out of frustration, I bought a Park CC-3 Chain Wear Gage. I found the problem, it was a worn out upper pulley. But Wait! I checked out all the old Sedis Sport chains and they were all good.

verktyg
__________________
Things aren't always what they seem... Don't believe everything you think!

Chas. ;-)
verktyg is offline  
Old 11-07-18, 09:12 AM
  #24  
verktyg 
verktyg
 
verktyg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 2,892

Bikes: Current favorites: 1988 Peugeot Birraritz, 1984 Gitane Super Corsa, 1981 Bianchi Campione Del Mondo, 1992 Paramount OS, 1990 Bianchi Mondiale, 1988 Colnago Technos, 1985 RalieghUSA Team Pro, 1973 Holdsworth

Mentioned: 127 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 502 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 21 Times in 19 Posts
Originally Posted by Lascauxcaveman View Post
Yeah. And pretty much every bicycle mechanic (professional and amateur) I've met uses WD40 to good effect for degreasing old components. I haven't met one who's complained about it 'ruining' anything. Except maybe a thin and fragile gold colored finish on a chain. And frankly, that's a new one to me, since I've cleaned up a couple of old gold Uniglide chains with the stuff and those chains are still nice and gold-colored. I'm guessing contact time matter quite a bit here.

If you want to make the point that WD40 is not a very good lubricant, I'll go along with you there, as it evaporates pretty quickly. But for cleaning stuff up before you add the lube; it's pretty hard to beat.
WD40 was developed to displace water in electrical equipment thus WD. Back in the 70's it was supposed to have contained some silicone which is a light duty lube???

In those days in New Mexico we used to use WD40 for chain lube. Water was almost never a problem but dust was. Most other lubricants at the time would pick up the fine grit and wear out your chain and sprockets. I applied the stuff before every ride. It helped keep the chains clean too.

Since I was running the shop and we bought Sedis Sport chains on 50 meter and 100 meter wooden spools, I changed my chains every 3000 miles whether they need it or not. They only cost me $3.00 each.

Fortunately I saved the old ones in baggies. I was having some shifting problems with my Ironman with a 7 sp SIS indexing RD. Out of frustration, I bought a Park CC-3 Chain Wear Gage. I found the problem, it was a worn out upper pulley. But Wait! I checked out all the old Sedis Sport chains and they were all good.

verktyg
__________________
Things aren't always what they seem... Don't believe everything you think!

Chas. ;-)
verktyg is offline  
Old 11-07-18, 09:22 AM
  #25  
exmechanic89
Senior Member
 
exmechanic89's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Richmond VA area
Posts: 2,722

Bikes: '00 Koga Miyata Full Pro Oval Road bike.

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 474 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Cute Boy Horse View Post
Well the WD40 tells us you wanted the chain ruined anyway. Seems it worked.
I tend to agree. The factory lube on chains is imo the best lubricant the chain will ever see in it's limited life, due to how it is applied when the chain is made. Removing it right away takes away one of the best parts of a new chain. YMMV.
exmechanic89 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.