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1988 Centurion Dave Scott Ironman Master Restoration

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1988 Centurion Dave Scott Ironman Master Restoration

Old 11-11-18, 12:43 PM
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UCSD1989
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1988 Centurion Dave Scott Ironman Master Restoration

I thought I'd start this with a bit of background.

In late 88 I was on the cycling team during my sop****re year of college at UCSD. When I joined the team I was riding an 85 Peugeot touring bike that I had bought new while I was living as a military brat in Germany. While the Peugeot was a nice bike, it wasn't really up to the job of being a racing bike. I started looking at a local bike shop in San Diego. Most of my friends then were riding Cannondales. I test rode one in my price range, but it felt soft and didn't seem to handle well. It could have been the frame geometry but I attributed it at the time to the aluminum frame. I then test rode the Ironman and was immediately impressed. It helped that with the Ironman I got Shimano 600 Ultegra instead of 105 series hardware.

Anyway, I rode it for my one season on the team, and while the bike was good I was still slow! :-) I continued to ride it after leaving the team, and rode it almost daily back and forth from my Dad's house to my law school campus downtown. After graduating law school, I immediately got married and moved to Hawaii and didn't bring the bike with me. It gathered dust in my in-laws' garage until I finally got it back about 5 years later when I moved to Arizona. Once I got to Arizona, I brought it out about once. The rest of the time it hung in my garage, suffering through year after year of 100+ garage temps during the Arizona summers.

A couple years ago I got the idea to get back on my bike as a means to get in shape. By then I had moved to a new house. The bike was dusty and tired and I knew it would need to be cleaned, lubricated and to have new tires, at the least, to make it road worthy again. Meanwhile, though I thought I had kept my Shimano hard soled racing shoes, I couldn't find them. Also, I had gotten used to the SPD pedals on my Yokota Twin Peaks, and decided that I wanted to get new shoes and "Look" style pedals that would be period correct, rather than continue to use the original "clipless" pedals with the Shimano cleats and toe straps.

I finally started to clean and look at the bike closely. After buying new tires and tubes I put the wheels back and and pedaled it. I could feel some drag and figured it was the bottom bracket. So began the idea of doing a mechanical restoration. I got a work bench mounted bike stand and mounted and started to tear it down, assess what I needed and hunt for parts. The seat was worn and dried out, and the handlebar tape worn as well. I managed to find OEM versions of both (the tape is NOS).

While the paint is mostly good, after pulling off the front derailleur, it became apparent that the pearl white paint was no longer truly white. From my research it appears that the paint used on these bikes was high quality, and presumably car paint. I have a friend that runs a production body repair shop who offered to repaint it, but (a) it's only original once, and (b) I'm not sure how or whether I could recreate the decals. Beyond the yellowing, there are numerous chips, particularly along the bottom of the frame in the white areas. My current thinking (and I'm open to suggestions) is to find some pearl paint and see if I can fill the chips, and then hit the rest with polishing compound to see if I can get the yellow out.

During my tear down I discovered the bottom bracket wasn't dragging, after all. Instead it was one of the jockey wheels. Apparently 600 Ultegra specific jockey wheels are unobtanium now, so I ordered some expensive Teflon replacements. The BB uses un-caged bearings, which apparently are preferred. So I ordered a kit of bearings off of Amazon that has both the sizes for the BB and for the headset.

At some point in the process I took apart the crankset, and didn't take a pic ahead of time. Now I'm not entirely sure how the small and large chainrings go in relation to each other. This being a biopace, I believe there is a specific right way they go together, and how the align with the crankarm. I am looking for help here, too.

I also bought new white cable sheaths and new cables.

The aero hoods are NLA and I have yet to find any NOS OEM versions. There are similar Shimano styles available new, but apparently they aren't a good fit. Mine are a bit oily and ugly, and they're also gummy. I've read that you can clean them up well and then put talc or the like on them to take away the gummy feel.

Beyond all of that, I cannot seem to get the pedals off of the crank arms. I just cannot seem to get them to break loose. So, I'm looking for help on this, too.

I will post photos once I figure out how to get them uploaded in a way that this forum will accept.
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Old 11-11-18, 12:59 PM
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Thread moved from C&V Appraisals forum to regular C&V forum.
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Old 11-11-18, 01:00 PM
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Whoops! Not sure how I managed to do that. Thanks.

I attempted to upload photos from (alternately) dropbox, from my computer hard drive, and from what appear to be uploaded photos to the forum. I keep getting the error message than I cannot post URLs until I have 10 posts. This is not my first forum, but it has been a while. Apparently I've lost technical proficiency.

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Old 11-11-18, 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by UCSD1989 View Post
I will post photos once I figure out how to get them uploaded in a way that this forum will accept.
Generally, if you resize your images <1MB, they will post.

Looking forward to the pics.
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Old 11-11-18, 02:48 PM
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@UCSD , hang in there we will get it figured out . There is this guy here that speaks IM https://www.pedalroom.com/bike/1988-...n-master-38044

He is usually here Post your Centurion Ironman.. For the love of 80s paint jobs!
There are a few other guys too .
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Old 11-11-18, 03:01 PM
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You will figure it out but here's some helpful pics.
Notice biopace (high side)should be engraved at the 12 o'clock while the pedal is at 6 o'clock. Also there's a protrusion that should line up on the underside of the crank arm.
Your drive side pedal is right hand threaded while your non drive side is left hand threaded so make sure your loosening in the correct direction.
​​​​​​​Looking forward to your restoration pics.
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Old 11-11-18, 07:43 PM
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Currently available hoods for those lever fit pretty good i think.
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Old 11-11-18, 07:50 PM
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Originally Posted by UCSD1989 View Post
Beyond all of that, I cannot seem to get the pedals off of the crank arms. I just cannot seem to get them to break loose. So, I'm looking for help on this, too.
Soak the threads with PBblaster overnight. Next day, using a pedal wrench and a mallet they should break free, if you strike in the direction as if you were reversing your pedaling. If that doesn't work, pull the cranks, clamp with a towel in a large vise, and go at it.
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Old 11-11-18, 08:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Classtime View Post


Currently available hoods for those lever fit pretty good i think.
Do I spy Cinelli Criterium (65 series) bars???
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Old 11-11-18, 10:59 PM
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Great year for the Ironman, one of my favorites, if not the favorite.


Welcome to the forum, for sure.


The yellowing is the clear coat over the 5 layers of paint, and yes, that paint job is very difficult to duplicate. You may be able to get down into it with rubbing compound, but the clear will remain a bit yellowed.


The decals are under the clearcoat, so removing them would be difficult. If you can get through the clear, you can also remove the decals, and new ones are available at VeloCals for the '88 "squiggles" theme.


There is already a photo of the crankset configuration with the chain rings properly aligned.


For about $50 in tools, you can disassemble that bike pretty well, clean, re-pack, and adjust the components, then re-assemble it. Since it already fits, and you know it well, it can be a great bike.


I plead bias, of course. The Ironman legend (not a myth) as a world-beater, aphrodisiac, champion steed, and general chick magnet is, of course, well known.
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Old 11-11-18, 11:24 PM
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Originally Posted by RiddleOfSteel View Post
Do I spy Cinelli Criterium (65 series) bars???
Wow! Good eye. Bars, stem and levers currently on my son's 89 IM. They weren't quite right on the Trek 710.
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Old 11-11-18, 11:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Classtime View Post

Wow! Good eye. Bars, stem and levers currently on my son's 89 IM. They weren't quite right on the Trek 710.
Thanks! I guessed them as I have two of those Criterium bars myself and really really like them. The bars really "get out of the way" of the brake lever, which allows essentially STI/Ergo alignment of one's hands when gripping the levers. Very natural and very comfortable, with the additional benefit of a killer cool old school side profile of the bike. All the benefits of, say, a Giro d'Italia with none of the comfort drawbacks. They're in a good place on the IM. I had them briefly on my '81 Trek 710, but only for verification of that frame's goodness (verdict: VERY GOOD). The bars have since migrated about my fleet. They're resting on my '91 Cannondale SC2000 at present. We shall see where they go next, hahaha.
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Old 11-12-18, 08:06 AM
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Originally Posted by oddjob2 View Post
using a pedal wrench and a mallet they should break free, if you strike in the direction as if you were reversing your pedaling.
Actually, the pedals loosen in the same direction they spin while forward pedaling. That always confused me.
Great story. Looking forward to pictures... those should be possible after you have ten posts.
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Old 11-20-18, 10:39 AM
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You will figure it out but here's some helpful pics.
Notice biopace (high side)should be engraved at the 12 o'clock while the pedal is at 6 o'clock. Also there's a protrusion that should line up on the underside of the crank arm.
Your drive side pedal is right hand threaded while your non drive side is left hand threaded so make sure your loosening in the correct direction.
​​​​​​​Looking forward to your restoration pics.
Thanks, that's very helpful. I just realized (remembered) that the pin on the outer chainring is to hold the chain in the event of a derailment. I'll have to look at mine when I get a chance.

As for the pedals, I thought I already hit them with PB Blaster, but if not, I'll give that a shot. Since the whole thing is disassembled right now I don't have anything to apply leverage against. I can put it in my bench vice if I can find a way to do that without scratching the crap out of the finish on the crank arms (which appear to be clear coated). I may have to create some wood blocks that will fit the vice and hold the crank arm while I apply pressure to break the pedals loose.

Last edited by UCSD1989; 11-20-18 at 10:54 AM.
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Old 11-20-18, 10:44 AM
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Originally Posted by RobbieTunes View Post
Great year for the Ironman, one of my favorites, if not the favorite.

The yellowing is the clear coat over the 5 layers of paint, and yes, that paint job is very difficult to duplicate. You may be able to get down into it with rubbing compound, but the clear will remain a bit yellowed.

The decals are under the clearcoat, so removing them would be difficult. If you can get through the clear, you can also remove the decals, and new ones are available at VeloCals for the '88 "squiggles" theme.

For about $50 in tools, you can disassemble that bike pretty well, clean, re-pack, and adjust the components, then re-assemble it. Since it already fits, and you know it well, it can be a great bike.
I've got a set of tools, and if I could actually post photos you'd see that I have the bike mostly disassembled right now. I've also bought the parts I need to do the restoration, except perhaps the hoods, which I cannot find (esp. in the original white).

I'm leaning toward finding some pearl white and filling in the various nicks and such and then spraying new clear coat over the fixed areas. For the rest, I'm inclined to polish it as much as possible and then leave it alone. I suppose that given its age, it SHOULD have some patina, right? :-)
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Old 11-20-18, 11:04 AM
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While I'm working my way to the minimum post count, I figure I'll give a bit more detail about myself. I have owned, cleaned and mostly maintained my own bicycles pretty much my entire life. I just haven't regularly ridden one for many years. Between work and kids and other priorities, it just didn't happen.

I'm not a complete mechanical moron, though I suppose I've done my fair share of stupid things. But together with a buddy I completely restored a 1980 FIAT X1/9. That's along with having worked on a variety of other cars over the years. So, I guess I'm not your average lawyer who drives a car whose name he cannot even pronounce and who lacks any mechanical wherewithal. It helps that my Dad was a mechanic and that I have had a natural inclination to take things apart and put them back together since I was a toddler (though as a toddler I wasn't so gifted or concerned with the putting back together aspect).

I have a vague recollection of having watched a bit of the original ironman race in Hawaii on Wide World of Sports in the early 80s. My Dad was an avid cyclist when I was younger, and did a bicycle tour of Europe with a girlfriend in the late 70s. His youngest brother was and is an avid cyclist who raced on a team at Fresno State in the 80s, and who went on to become a pilot and for a while was a pilot for a now infamous cyclist. It was through this brother (who is only about 4.5 years older than I) that I became aware of and then a fan of the Tour de France, beginning in the Lemond era.

I suppose all of this should be in my welcome post or in a thread along the lines of "Tell Us Your History with Bicycles" but I figured since I'm killing time until I make a post count and since this might give some insight into why I have this bike and my abilities relative to its restoration, I'd just share it here.
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Old 11-20-18, 03:46 PM
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Originally Posted by UCSD1989 View Post
I thought I'd start this with a bit of background.

In late 88 I was on the cycling team during my sop****re year of college at UCSD. When I joined the team I was riding an 85 Peugeot touring bike that I had bought new while I was living as a military brat in Germany. While the Peugeot was a nice bike, it wasn't really up to the job of being a racing bike. I started looking at a local bike shop in San Diego. Most of my friends then were riding Cannondales. I test rode one in my price range, but it felt soft and didn't seem to handle well. It could have been the frame geometry but I attributed it at the time to the aluminum frame. I then test rode the Ironman and was immediately impressed. It helped that with the Ironman I got Shimano 600 Ultegra instead of 105 series hardware.

Anyway, I rode it for my one season on the team, and while the bike was good I was still slow! :-) I continued to ride it after leaving the team, and rode it almost daily back and forth from my Dad's house to my law school campus downtown. After graduating law school, I immediately got married and moved to Hawaii and didn't bring the bike with me. It gathered dust in my in-laws' garage until I finally got it back about 5 years later when I moved to Arizona. Once I got to Arizona, I brought it out about once. The rest of the time it hung in my garage, suffering through year after year of 100+ garage temps during the Arizona summers.

A couple years ago I got the idea to get back on my bike as a means to get in shape. By then I had moved to a new house. The bike was dusty and tired and I knew it would need to be cleaned, lubricated and to have new tires, at the least, to make it road worthy again. Meanwhile, though I thought I had kept my Shimano hard soled racing shoes, I couldn't find them. Also, I had gotten used to the SPD pedals on my Yokota Twin Peaks, and decided that I wanted to get new shoes and "Look" style pedals that would be period correct, rather than continue to use the original "clipless" pedals with the Shimano cleats and toe straps.

I finally started to clean and look at the bike closely. After buying new tires and tubes I put the wheels back and and pedaled it. I could feel some drag and figured it was the bottom bracket. So began the idea of doing a mechanical restoration. I got a work bench mounted bike stand and mounted and started to tear it down, assess what I needed and hunt for parts. The seat was worn and dried out, and the handlebar tape worn as well. I managed to find OEM versions of both (the tape is NOS).

While the paint is mostly good, after pulling off the front derailleur, it became apparent that the pearl white paint was no longer truly white. From my research it appears that the paint used on these bikes was high quality, and presumably car paint. I have a friend that runs a production body repair shop who offered to repaint it, but (a) it's only original once, and (b) I'm not sure how or whether I could recreate the decals. Beyond the yellowing, there are numerous chips, particularly along the bottom of the frame in the white areas. My current thinking (and I'm open to suggestions) is to find some pearl paint and see if I can fill the chips, and then hit the rest with polishing compound to see if I can get the yellow out.

During my tear down I discovered the bottom bracket wasn't dragging, after all. Instead it was one of the jockey wheels. Apparently 600 Ultegra specific jockey wheels are unobtanium now, so I ordered some expensive Teflon replacements. The BB uses un-caged bearings, which apparently are preferred. So I ordered a kit of bearings off of Amazon that has both the sizes for the BB and for the headset.

At some point in the process I took apart the crankset, and didn't take a pic ahead of time. Now I'm not entirely sure how the small and large chainrings go in relation to each other. This being a biopace, I believe there is a specific right way they go together, and how the align with the crankarm. I am looking for help here, too.

I also bought new white cable sheaths and new cables.

The aero hoods are NLA and I have yet to find any NOS OEM versions. There are similar Shimano styles available new, but apparently they aren't a good fit. Mine are a bit oily and ugly, and they're also gummy. I've read that you can clean them up well and then put talc or the like on them to take away the gummy feel.

Beyond all of that, I cannot seem to get the pedals off of the crank arms. I just cannot seem to get them to break loose. So, I'm looking for help on this, too.

I will post photos once I figure out how to get them uploaded in a way that this forum will accept.
I'll work my way up, as it's easier when viewing the original post.

1-The leverage provided by a pedal wrench cannot be discounted. Most shops have them, and they can be bought for $15-$20. The key to them is a sharp, accurate 15mm opening (too big rounds off the pedal part), and a long arm, for leverage. Remember, they unscrew in the opposite manner of the pedal rotation, so on the R side, counterclockwise, and on the L side, clockwise.

2-The hoods are available, eBay has them quite often, the search is just a bit tedious. A lot depends on whether you want black or white, but the 6400 SLR hoods that were on the bike as OEM are out there. Another suggestion is to find a set of levers with hoods, and swap over the hoods, or just use the other set of levers/hoods. On white, mild soap (like bar soap) and a Magic Eraser or generic equivalent will be fine. If they get gummy, that's a pretty much "set" situation, but can be alleviated with Armor-All protectant, talc, and other stuff that doesn't deteriorate the rubber compound in the hood.

3-Ok, you're set on the cables/housings. Sheath is a little creepy.


4-There should be a small "spike" on the large chainring that goes under the R crank arm. If not, look for markings or an indicator tab on the chainring, like a pointer. There should be one on the inner chainring. Since this is a friction L shifter, you can mount the inner ring any way you want, as long as it lines up correctly. There is no inside out. We used to wear out the teeth a bit, then turn them inside out.

5-Bearings, if the right size, are bearings, so clean the BB cups, use good fresh grease, and simply repack and adjust them.

6-As far as the jockey wheels, they're not "generic," but close. The "wobbly" wheel should be on the bottom of the RD. (I think). Slick 50's "1-Lube" is a good lube for those brass/plastic sleeves. It is a lube, not a solvent, so be careful, you'll have to really clean your hands after using it. I use it for all pivot points on components, and inside my cable housings. For shifter cable, I spray some on a rag and run the cable through it. Messy but works.

7-You won't get a lot of the yellowing out of that pearl clear coat. Rubbing compound will not do it. Wash the frame with soap and water, but remember, detergents are hard on good finish. I often spend at least an hour on a bare frame and fork, liberally applying WD40 and then rubbing the frame hard. You'd be surprised that what appear to be paint defects are just stuck foreign materials.

8-VeloCals has the decals for your model. The frame stickers are separate, on top of the clear coat. The decals are under the clear coat.

8-Saddles, like their contact with you, are personal. While the brand spec'd a Turbo, ride what is comfortable and works.

Lastly, but firstly, in the order I'm doing this...Welcome to Bike Forums. There is a particular kind of crazy here.
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Old 11-20-18, 05:06 PM
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For pedals I always remember loose equals toward the back of the bike

you will find there is a lot of interest in Ironman bike here.......

Ironman Information Thread

Post your Centurion Ironman.. For the love of 80s paint jobs!
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Old 11-20-18, 05:07 PM
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Originally Posted by RobbieTunes View Post
3-Ok, you're set on the cables/housings. Sheath is a little creepy.
Well, the definition of a sheath is a close-fitting cover for something, especially something that is elongated in shape. Seems to fit the bill, though my juvenile brain certainly understands from where you are coming.

Originally Posted by RobbieTunes View Post
Lastly, but firstly, in the order I'm doing this...Welcome to Bike Forums. There is a particular kind of crazy here.
Thanks! I think I probably fit that special kind of crazy.
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Old 11-20-18, 05:10 PM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
For pedals I always remember loose equals toward the back of the bike

you will find there is a lot of interest in Ironman bike here.......
Yes, that's how I wound up here in the first place. I did some google searches for Centurion Ironman.
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Old 11-20-18, 10:15 PM
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Originally Posted by UCSD1989 View Post
Yes, that's how I wound up here in the first place. I did some google searches for Centurion Ironman.

I just realized I have a set of those decals sitting right here.
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Old 11-20-18, 10:24 PM
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Pearl white is one of the hardest colors, because its shade is very much affected on how the metallic flakes in the paint "lay" and it us close to impossible to match how the flakes in the original paint surround ding a touch up are distributed and laid down in the paint.
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Old 11-20-18, 10:26 PM
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The '88 is a great model. Just had a good balance.

My most "recent" one, came from oddjob2 here on Bike Forums. He is world renowned for his ability to chat up Continental tire "representatives." Mainly because of his Ironman connection. The legends are true.

This one served me well, from hot NC rides to The Storming of Thunder Ridge, and the Dairyland Dare, from 2x8 Campy cheapo to 2x9 DA.

However, it got a bit rusty, especially on the top tube cable guides. I had to do an intervention, before it was too late.

I talked it into a makeover. I promised not to 650B it, and it held still during the process.

Some call it heresy, some say bike blasphemy. It's an Ironman, it rolls how it rolls. Always good. It's not "pretty" anymore, and the '80's vibe is sort of gone. But, no fear, it rolls like the Clash on a hot summer stage.
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Old 11-22-18, 02:19 PM
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Now that I've Posted 10 Times...

O.K. Now that I've got my 10 post minimum, it's time to show a bit of what the bike looks like right now. These were relatively recent photos I took to (a) make sure I had images of what the decals looked like, and (b) to show the yellowing in the pearl white paint.


Notice brighter white band where derailleur used to be.





Decals still in good shape.


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Old 11-22-18, 06:25 PM
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So full disclosure I've never tried this on a bicycle but I have on guitars. And all the guitars I've used this technique on were way more valuable than any bicycle I've ever owned.
Some guitars are in very yellow looking condition making them appear "vintage" but in fact simply yellowed from the elements e.g. smoke. This may be the case with your bicycle. The cure is to use a clean cloth (its very important that the cloth be clean) and squirt some Lighter Fluid on the cloth and clean your frame. It dries very quickly. It does wonders on hard gigged guitars. Like I said I've never used it on bicycles but I think @rccardr has. Hopefully he can chime in.

As a side note, you may have difficulty locating nail polish in the white seeing how there's not a lot of demand for yellowed white nail polish and that sparkle is very hard to replicate. Honestly I'm not sure the purpleish sparkle is in the white but in the clear coat.
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