Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Squealing brakes

Old 11-11-18, 09:05 PM
  #1  
shoff535
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
shoff535's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Dallas
Posts: 88

Bikes: Current Stable: 1973 Mercian Vincitore;1985 CIOCC Designer'84;1988 Raleigh "531c USA" ;1990 LeMond Maillot Jaune Z Team;1996 Calfee LunaPro-Lemond Z team Tribute Replica

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Squealing brakes

installed a set of the salmon kool stop pads on some Modolo Speedy calipers. The front are fine, but the rear squeal when used. In the old days, with Dia-Compe Id tru to bend the caliper arms a bit so that the front would contact the rim first... is that still a good option with 35 year old brakes?

thanks
Steve
shoff535 is offline  
Old 11-11-18, 09:47 PM
  #2  
mtbikerinpa
Shimano Certified
 
mtbikerinpa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: PA
Posts: 1,840

Bikes: 92 Giant Sedona ATX Custom

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I wouldn't consider strictly age to be a problem with wether or not to bend them. If they look relatively unmolested you should be fine to fine adjust them.
mtbikerinpa is offline  
Old 11-11-18, 10:25 PM
  #3  
Lascauxcaveman 
Senior Member
 
Lascauxcaveman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Port Angeles, WA
Posts: 7,258

Bikes: A green one, "Ragleigh," or something.

Mentioned: 158 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1307 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 19 Posts
Or just 'toe-in' the new pads by sanding them down a bit. Your belt sander can do this in 4 seconds, or if you don't have one, maybe 20 seconds if you just do it with a piece of sandpaper laid flat on the shelf. This is my preference because brake pads and sandpaper are both cheaper than new brake calipers. If they are aluminum alloy you should only bend them once.
__________________
● 1971 Grandis SL ● 1972 Lambert Grand Prix frankenbike ● 1972 Raleigh Super Course fixie ● 1973 Nishiki Semi-Pro ● 1980 Apollo "Legnano" ● 1981 Miyata 1000 ● 1984 Bianchi Limited ● 1984 Nishiki Landau ● 1984 Peugeot Vagabond ● 1985 Trek 600 ● 1985 Shogun Prairie Breaker ● 1986 Univega Nuovo Sport ● 1986 Merckx Super Corsa ● 1987 Schwinn Tempo ● 1988 Schwinn Voyageur ● 1989 Trek 400 ● 1990 Cannondale ST600 ● 1993 Technium RT600 ● 1996 Kona Lava Dome ● And a Bike to Be Named Later ●

Last edited by Lascauxcaveman; 11-11-18 at 10:33 PM.
Lascauxcaveman is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 07:00 AM
  #4  
shoff535
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
shoff535's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Dallas
Posts: 88

Bikes: Current Stable: 1973 Mercian Vincitore;1985 CIOCC Designer'84;1988 Raleigh "531c USA" ;1990 LeMond Maillot Jaune Z Team;1996 Calfee LunaPro-Lemond Z team Tribute Replica

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Ah, thanks both for the comments and thoughts. I think my concern with bending the speedy's was/is more related to .. they don't make them like that anymore, as well as I thought one of the early criticisms of the speedys was that the caliper arms were "thinner" than others and therefore flexed more (not sure if that's correct, but it is something I've run across).

I'd actually thought of saning the pads, but I guess I wasn't sure if it would work, so I'm glad that it was suggested.. I'll give it a try !

Thanks,
Steve
shoff535 is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 08:17 AM
  #5  
HarborBandS
HarborBandS
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Chicago Western Suburbs
Posts: 279
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 8 Posts
If the new brake pads have the proper set of nuts/bolts/washers, you should be able to toe-in the pads without bending the caliper arms or sanding the pads. Just stick a dime under the trailing side of the brake pad when it's against your rim and tighten it down.

My bike shop years were from 1991-1996, so most of the bikes that came in for repairs were "vintage" going back to the 1960's, and I don't think I ever had to bend a caliper arm to toe in brake pads, with the exception of some really inexpensive department store bike brakes.

Other reasons for squeaky brakes could be brake pad wear and the rim surface, so you may also want to clean the surface of your rims with a cotton ball dipped in rubbing alcohol. Or you may want to roughen up the brake pad surface with sand paper.
HarborBandS is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 10:30 AM
  #6  
Chombi1 
Senior Member
 
Chombi1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 2,766
Mentioned: 89 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 971 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
In the early 80's the Weinman sidelulls on my Peugeot responded well to toeing in its brake pads by slightly bending in the caliper ends, using an adjustable wrench. I've found out from this forum though, that the same does not work for other brake calipers and you can end up breaking off the ends of the caliper if you try to bend them. I guess it comes down to how brittle the aluminum that was used to make the caliper was.
Chombi1 is online now  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Sgvpicker
Classic & Vintage
20
03-29-19 06:14 AM
Omnicycler
Recumbent
3
05-25-13 04:02 PM
calamarichris
Southern California
8
12-03-09 08:07 AM
ElJamoquio
"The 33"-Road Bike Racing
0
04-20-08 06:42 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.