Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Bike Shop Rip Van Winkle

Old 11-12-18, 09:18 AM
  #1  
HarborBandS
HarborBandS
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Chicago Western Suburbs
Posts: 279
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 8 Posts
Bike Shop Rip Van Winkle

I worked in a (now defunct) glorious Local Bike Shop from 1991-1996, during the boom years of early mountain bike and hybrids. It was a small operation (2-4 employees during my tenure), so I was both a wrench and a salesman. I owned a 1989 Fuji Sagres SP "sport touring" road bike and a bonded carbon/aluminum Trek 8700 mountain bike, which I raced occasionally in local races. I operated a "SAG Wagon" for a local Metric Century, and road my bikes as often as I could. Then I moved to some larger urban areas and largely lost my interest in cycling, only to jump back in this year after a 20 year absence.


My early 2018 trips to area bike shops had the disorienting feeling of Rip Van Winkle's decades long slumber. I have naturally gravitated toward the C&V forum here just because the bikes are from the era I know, so it feels more comfortable. Sure, we were selling a lot of 1990's Trek 730 Hybrids and GT Tequestas at the time, but we were servicing hundreds of bikes from the 1960's through the 1980's as well.


So how does 20+ years of change in the bike industry look to a 1990's bike shop employee who was frozen in a block of ice during that time?


1. Mountain Bikes. What the heck happened to mountain bikes? This is by far the biggest set of changes that were immediately apparent. Everything from wheel size to frame geometry is radically different. They don't even look like the same machines. Yet I still see hundreds of 1990's chromoly mountain bikes in daily use on local streets due to their practicality as daily commuters, and rarely see anyone riding a "29'er" unless they are truly riding off road. It seems like they have lost the mass appeal of the older MTB's, except in the kid's market.


2. Road Bikes. Less change is apparent here. "Brifters" are now ubiquitous throughout most price points, while they were only on higher-end groupsets back in the early 90's. Frame geometries are now "compact" with sloping top tubes and more seat post exposed, but effective top tube lengths and wheel-bases are not that different. Bottom brackets are higher off the ground to avoid pedal strikes. I'm still trying to figure out how other changes have affected ride, comparing my vintage rides to my friends' modern bikes.


3. Frame materials. Steel is gone for the most point on large production bikes, and has been banished to small manufacturers and custom builds. Aluminum is now the least expensive option, and tube sections aren't necessarily round. Tubes can be formed and shaped in to sweeping curves or aerodynamic forms. Carbon options abound and allow for even more radical shapes and aerodynamic forms. I actually have a friend who is an active cyclist and says he has never owned "one of those skinny tube bikes".


4. New Bike Genres. Gravel bikes. Cyclocross bikes. Adventure bikes. It seems like there are at least a dozen micro-genre's for various drop-bar bikes. It also seems like the "gravel bike" is perhaps the best mix of options for most people, though I'm pretty sure we all came up with it on our own 25 years ago by changing tires on road or touring frames with higher tire clearances.


5. Price. Holy $@$%^#@, bikes have gotten expensive. Back in the 1990's we still sold a crap load of $350 bikes, a smaller number of $500+ bikes, a couple dozen $1,000+ bikes, and had maybe one or two $2,000+ bikes in the shop a year as showpieces that never sold and ultimately ended up in the hands of the shop owner (which he then sold used the following year for a significant price break). Now we are seeing $5,000 or even $10,000+ bikes on my local streets here in the Chicago burbs. Even with inflation-adjusted dollars, it does seem like the prices of bikes have increased quite a bit, and that the higher end is more popular than it used to be.


What are the other monumental changes of the last 25 years? What did I miss? I hear that a certain celebrity American cyclist got in to some trouble with PED's...

Last edited by HarborBandS; 11-12-18 at 11:21 AM. Reason: Rip Van Winkle, not Rumpelstiltskin
HarborBandS is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 09:26 AM
  #2  
wgscott
Occam's Rotor
 
wgscott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: The Timbers of Fennario (CL77)
Posts: 4,888

Bikes: Steel

Mentioned: 61 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2366 Post(s)
Liked 214 Times in 133 Posts
Arse Technica just had an article on this. (It is very basic and not written for a bike audience.)

https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2018...-wheeled-tech/

For road bikes, the biggest changes I personally noticed between my latest (2014) purchase and my previous one (1987):

1. Frame materials (although I stuck with steel).
2. Disc brakes.
3. Drive train (especially the transition from freewheel to feehub and much wider gear range).
4. Shifters (I went from downtube friction to Di2).

I got the distinct impression that several of the advances (disk brakes, stems, etc.) originated with mountain bikes.

Last edited by wgscott; 11-12-18 at 09:37 AM.
wgscott is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 09:35 AM
  #3  
HarborBandS
HarborBandS
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Chicago Western Suburbs
Posts: 279
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
Arse Technica just had an article on this. (It is very basic and not written for a bike audience.)

https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2018...-wheeled-tech/
Cool article. Thanks for posting. The Trek 1200 in that photo brings back some memories.
HarborBandS is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 09:53 AM
  #4  
HarborBandS
HarborBandS
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Chicago Western Suburbs
Posts: 279
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 8 Posts
Other changes that confounded me:

Disk brakes
Hydraulics brake lines
Electronic shifting
Hollowtech II and other external bearing bottom brackets/cranksets
Through-axle
Steerers tapered or larger than 1-1/8"
"Dropper" seat posts
Multiple-click "trim" on a front shifting brifter
Straight-pull spokes

Last edited by HarborBandS; 11-12-18 at 09:56 AM.
HarborBandS is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 10:19 AM
  #5  
SpeedofLite 
Senior Member
 
SpeedofLite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Henderson, NV, USA
Posts: 446

Bikes: Litespeed (8); Slingshot (6); Specialized (2); Kestrel (2); Softride (2); Cervelo (1); FELT (1); Cannondale (1); Fuji (1); Centurion (1); Schwinn (1)

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 110 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by HarborBandS View Post
What are the other monumental changes of the last 25 years? What did I miss?
Aerodynamics of triathlon/TT bikes, including integration of componentry with the frame.

Modern re-issues of collectible classics, especially Schwinn Sting-Rays and coaster brake heavyweights/middleweights.
__________________
WTB: Slingshot road model (1990s era; 18" L or 20" XL frame size)
WTB: Slingshot promotional documents (catalog, pamphlets, etc).
WTB: Bicycling! Issues Oct 1969 and Jan 1973.
WTB: ZIPP 500 front wheel (650c clincher)
SpeedofLite is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 11:04 AM
  #6  
3speedslow
Senior Member
 
3speedslow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Jacksonville, NC
Posts: 7,273

Bikes: A few

Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1241 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 25 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by SpeedofLite View Post
Aerodynamics of triathlon/TT bikes, including integration of componentry with the frame.

Modern re-issues of collectible classics, especially Schwinn Sting-Rays and coaster brake heavyweights/middleweights.
+1 Have you seen the bike with little doors on the head tube that open up to allow the wheel to turn? The front brake is tucked into the HT and needs the door to open so it has the space to move. Bike shop employee must of thought I was an idiot standing there moving the handle bar back and forth.
3speedslow is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 11:10 AM
  #7  
Trakhak
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 1,699
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 366 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 11 Posts
Rip van Winkle, not Rumpelstiltskin.
Trakhak is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 11:11 AM
  #8  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 8,272

Bikes: '87 Schwinn Prelude, Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara/Centurion Ironman, '18 Diamondback Syncr, '18 handmade steel roadbike

Mentioned: 76 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2968 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 148 Times in 105 Posts
Rip Van Winkle? That dude slept.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 11:17 AM
  #9  
Pompiere
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NW Ohio
Posts: 2,464

Bikes: 1984 Miyata 310, 1986 Schwinn Sierra, 2011 Jamis Quest, 1980 Peugeot TH8 Tandem, 1992 Performance Parabola, 1987 Ross Mt. Hood, 1988 Schwinn LeTour, 1988 Trek 400T

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 218 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 7 Posts
In 2011, I decided that I deserved a new bike, after riding the same bike for 27 years. I had to ask the salesperson how to work the new-fangled shifters.
Pompiere is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 11:46 AM
  #10  
SpeedofLite 
Senior Member
 
SpeedofLite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Henderson, NV, USA
Posts: 446

Bikes: Litespeed (8); Slingshot (6); Specialized (2); Kestrel (2); Softride (2); Cervelo (1); FELT (1); Cannondale (1); Fuji (1); Centurion (1); Schwinn (1)

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 110 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by 3speedslow View Post


+1 Have you seen the bike with little doors on the head tube that open up to allow the wheel to turn? The front brake is tucked into the HT and needs the door to open so it has the space to move. Bike shop employee must of thought I was an idiot standing there moving the handle bar back and forth.
No, I haven't seen or heard of that. Who makes the frame?
__________________
WTB: Slingshot road model (1990s era; 18" L or 20" XL frame size)
WTB: Slingshot promotional documents (catalog, pamphlets, etc).
WTB: Bicycling! Issues Oct 1969 and Jan 1973.
WTB: ZIPP 500 front wheel (650c clincher)
SpeedofLite is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 12:09 PM
  #11  
wgscott
Occam's Rotor
 
wgscott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: The Timbers of Fennario (CL77)
Posts: 4,888

Bikes: Steel

Mentioned: 61 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2366 Post(s)
Liked 214 Times in 133 Posts
Originally Posted by HarborBandS View Post
Holy crap, you're right! Apparently my time away from classic fairy tales has been longer than my time away from bike shops.

Any idea how to change a thread title?
Change it to "TrumpleThinSkin" and they will move it to P&R.
wgscott is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 01:39 PM
  #12  
stardognine
Turquoise gatherer.
 
stardognine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Arid Arizona, for now.
Posts: 1,568

Bikes: 1985 Cannondale ST400

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 330 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 17 Times in 17 Posts
Originally Posted by HarborBandS View Post


4. New Bike Genres. Gravel bikes. Cyclocross bikes. Adventure bikes. It seems like there are at least a dozen micro-genre's for various drop-bar bikes. It also seems like the "gravel bike" is perhaps the best mix of options for most people, though I'm pretty sure we all came up with it on our own 25 years ago by changing tires on road or touring frames with higher tire clearances.

:
That's pretty interesting, that your list included Adventure bikes. Cannondale called my Silk Path an adventure bike, in their 2000 catalog, but I don't recall seeing that term in writing, anywhere else (besides the decal). 🤔😉 This one's like a beefed up touring bike, with a built-in Headshok. 😎
stardognine is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 02:06 PM
  #13  
HarborBandS
HarborBandS
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Chicago Western Suburbs
Posts: 279
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by stardognine View Post
That's pretty interesting, that your list included Adventure bikes. Cannondale called my Silk Path an adventure bike, in their 2000 catalog, but I don't recall seeing that term in writing, anywhere else (besides the decal). ���� This one's like a beefed up touring bike, with a built-in Headshok. ��
The newer genres seem pretty fluid. "Adventure Bike" seems like it could really describe just about anything.

Another genre bender that seems to have come and gone is the "fitness bike", which I think was just a hybrid built for a little more speed with street tires and lighter wheels. Is anyone selling these any more?

I had never heard of cyclocross until a few years ago when a friend posted Facebook photos of a bunch of racers running up a grassy hill with bikes slung over their shoulders. I completely missed that one. Apparently it's been around for many decades in some form or another, but the popularity increased after the mid-1990's, thus developing during my hibernation. For us 25 years ago a "cross bike" was a "hybrid bike". Cyclocross bikes are pretty well-developed and now governed by UCI, so clearly it's a thing.

It took some serious examination to tell the difference between a cyclocross bike and a gravel bike, but I think GCN has set me straight on that one. Maybe.

We did a lot of experimentation with different tires and builds, however. MTB's with slicks and touring bikes with knobby tires were around. Someone brought around an early version of a "Fat Bike". I appreciate the ingenuity, and sometimes something catches on.
HarborBandS is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 02:53 PM
  #14  
The Golden Boy 
Extraordinary Magnitude
 
The Golden Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Waukesha WI
Posts: 11,366

Bikes: 1977 Trek TX700; 1978/79 Trek 736; 1984 Specialized Stumpjumper Sport; 1984 Schwinn Voyageur SP; 1985 Trek 620; 1985 Trek 720; 1986 Trek 400 Elance; 1987 Schwinn High Sierra; 1990 Miyata 1000LT

Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1713 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 36 Posts
Originally Posted by HarborBandS View Post
Other changes that confounded me:

Disk brakes
Hydraulics brake lines
Electronic shifting
Hollowtech II and other external bearing bottom brackets/cranksets
Through-axle
Steerers tapered or larger than 1-1/8"
"Dropper" seat posts
Multiple-click "trim" on a front shifting brifter
Straight-pull spokes

I read these words... I do not know what they mean. For all I know you're making up pentoozium processo words to confound me.
__________________
*Recipient of the 2006 Time Magazine "Person Of The Year" Award*

Commence to jigglin’ huh?!?!

"But hey, always love to hear from opinionated amateurs." -says some guy to Mr. Marshall.
The Golden Boy is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 03:04 PM
  #15  
wgscott
Occam's Rotor
 
wgscott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: The Timbers of Fennario (CL77)
Posts: 4,888

Bikes: Steel

Mentioned: 61 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2366 Post(s)
Liked 214 Times in 133 Posts
Originally Posted by HarborBandS View Post
Another genre bender that seems to have come and gone is the "fitness bike", which I think was just a hybrid built for a little more speed with street tires and lighter wheels. Is anyone selling these any more?
A little company called Trek.

https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/b...-bikes/c/B420/

This is our most popular bike category
Also, Specialized: https://www.specialized.com/us/en/sh...rban/c/fitness

My wife has one of these. Basically a road bike with flat bars for people who don't like drops. I think it lowers the price, too, because they can use less expensive mountain bike parts.

Last edited by wgscott; 11-12-18 at 03:18 PM.
wgscott is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 03:05 PM
  #16  
3speedslow
Senior Member
 
3speedslow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Jacksonville, NC
Posts: 7,273

Bikes: A few

Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1241 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 25 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by SpeedofLite View Post
No, I haven't seen or heard of that. Who makes the frame?
I think, think it is a Trek gizmo item. I was so puzzled by the whole #$%* I first thought it was air resistance brakes or steering aids.
3speedslow is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 04:02 PM
  #17  
USAZorro
Señor Member
 
USAZorro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Florence, KY
Posts: 16,214

Bikes: Mostly English - predominantly Raleighs

Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 695 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by HarborBandS View Post
Holy crap, you're right! Apparently my time away from classic fairy tales has been longer than my time away from bike shops.

Any idea how to change a thread title?
Click the red ! symbol, and ask the moderators to change the title.

It's down here
.................|
.................|
............../
.........../
......../
__________________
In search of what to search for.

Last edited by USAZorro; 11-12-18 at 04:07 PM.
USAZorro is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 04:18 PM
  #18  
Spaghetti Legs 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Central Virginia
Posts: 3,217

Bikes: Numerous

Mentioned: 69 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 799 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 16 Times in 14 Posts
Cyclocross began in Europe some time around the end of WW1, so not a new thing, although got more popular in the states 15-20 years ago.

I think maybe more people ride ultra high end bikes now but I wonder if that’s a sign of the economy and willingness to burn disposable income rather than bikes being more expensive in general. I bought a Trek 1000 on sale at a shop in SF in 1991. The first (I think maybe only) new complete bike I ever bought. It was somewhere around $300. I also bought a 105 RD and Royal Gran Compe brakes out of the sale bin. What is that in 2018 bucks - $600? I could probably get an equivalent bike for about the same today. The catalog that the original owner gave me when I bought his ‘89 Bianchi Giro had $1250 written for the price. You could probably find a Campy Centaur equipped bike for $2500 today without too much trouble.

I often wonder if I’m just an old grouch, but bikes today just aren’t as pretty. Mountain bikes hit a sweet spot with semi sloping top tubes, front suspension only and they looked tough and graceful at the same time. Now they just look like tractors.
__________________
N = '96 Colnago C40, '04 Wilier Alpe D'Huez, '10 Colnago EPS, '85 Merckx Pro, '89 Merckx Century, '85 Moser, '86 Tommasini Professional, '04 Teschner Aero FX Pro, '05 Alan Carbon Cross, '86 De Rosa Professional, '82 Colnago Super, '95 Gios Compact Pro, '95 Carrera Zeus, '84 Basso Gap, ‘89 Cinelli Supercorsa
Spaghetti Legs is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 04:29 PM
  #19  
wgscott
Occam's Rotor
 
wgscott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: The Timbers of Fennario (CL77)
Posts: 4,888

Bikes: Steel

Mentioned: 61 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2366 Post(s)
Liked 214 Times in 133 Posts
It doesn't really matter. It is a good thread, by any name.
wgscott is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 04:36 PM
  #20  
HarborBandS
HarborBandS
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Chicago Western Suburbs
Posts: 279
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by Spaghetti Legs View Post
The first (I think maybe only) new complete bike I ever bought. It was somewhere around $300. I also bought a 105 RD and Royal Gran Compe brakes out of the sale bin. What is that in 2018 bucks - $600?
$551.98, according to the BLS CPI calculator.

In my mind, a $1,000 bike in the early to mid ‘90’s was a very good bike. Not top of the line, but respectable at a race. That’s $1,600 to $1,800 today, which is near entry level for a new Trek or Specialized.
HarborBandS is offline  
Old 11-12-18, 04:38 PM
  #21  
RandolphCarter
Senior Member
 
RandolphCarter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Round Lake. NY
Posts: 231

Bikes: 1986 Trek 310 Elance, 1997 Schwinn HydraGlide, 1987 Trek Antelope 800, 2003 Haro F4, 198? Allsop Offroad Climber

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 2 Posts
i too had an extended period of time hibernating from trends in the cycling industry.

In addition to what the other posters have mentioned, there are some things that just stood out to me.

The first was threadless headsets. This was a complete, full stop, 'OK, WTF' moment, where i had to resort to youtube clips to get up to speed.

The second was how incredibly crappy the big box store low end bikes have gotten. It is really really difficult to keep the brakes and gears on those things in tune, and the hub and bottom bracket bearings seem designed to catch any and all road grit and water for maximum race and cone damage.

The most unexpected thing was how much cheaper a full groupset is when you order it from one of the large British-based bike part websites
RandolphCarter is offline  
Old 11-13-18, 12:13 PM
  #22  
gugie 
Crapmaster Emeritus
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 7,363

Bikes: JP Weigle'd Raleigh Competition reconstruct, 73 Raleigh Competition 650b'ed, 96 Bike Friday NWT, 83 Lotus Classique, 78 Centurion ProTour, 73 Raleigh Grand Sports

Mentioned: 777 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2219 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 47 Times in 35 Posts
Welcome to the crowd.

As many have noted, C&V might as well refer to the people who post here rather than the bikes. Your path is similar to mine and many others. Lots of us worked in an LBS "BITD", then life got in the way. For me it was a real career (nowadays > 40 hrs/week), then marriage (need to spend time with her), finally kids (yeah, now there's 10 lbs of crap to stuff in a 5 lb sack), so the bikes collected dust. At some point the kids needed to learn how to ride a bike, so off we went on 1-2 mile rides together. At some point they grow up to the point where they're not asking you for help every 15 minutes or needing supervision, and a sliver of spare time became available, and we realized that we really like to ride and work on our bikes. I don't work on brifters and all this new stuff mainly because my knowledge is frozen in the late 80's. Eroica rules limit us to pre-1987 technology, many of us wonder why we need anything past that!
__________________
If someone tells you that you have enough bicycles and you don't need any more, stop talking to them. You don't need that kind of negativity in your life.
gugie is offline  
Old 11-13-18, 12:56 PM
  #23  
madpogue 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Madison, WI USA
Posts: 2,864
Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 652 Post(s)
Liked 49 Times in 42 Posts
Originally Posted by Spaghetti Legs View Post
I often wonder if I’m just an old grouch, but bikes today just aren’t as pretty. Mountain bikes hit a sweet spot with semi sloping top tubes, front suspension only and they looked tough and graceful at the same time. Now they just look like tractors.
+1 on the tractor look. In another recent thread, another member referred to the side-on view of a modern MTB as looking like "a dog pooping". Now I can't get either image out of my mind.....
madpogue is online now  
Old 11-13-18, 01:14 PM
  #24  
HarborBandS
HarborBandS
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Chicago Western Suburbs
Posts: 279
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by RandolphCarter View Post
The first was threadless headsets. This was a complete, full stop, 'OK, WTF' moment, where i had to resort to youtube clips to get up to speed.
My time in the mid-90's did overlap the threadless headset introduction on higher end models (the famous "Ahead-Set" and it's immitators), so I did at least have some experience with those. But now the head tubes have gotten HUGE on some frames, and there is these tapered steerers. So far I haven't worked on any of these.

And there are also the low profile headsets that disappear in to the frame.

YouTube was my friend for the new HollowTech II bottom brackets. Thank you RJ the Bike Guy.

So headsets disappear in to the frame, but bottom brackets are pulled out? Okay.

Originally Posted by madpogue View Post
+1 on the tractor look. In another recent thread, another member referred to the side-on view of a modern MTB as looking like "a dog pooping". Now I can't get either image out of my mind.....
Oh, I can't un-see it now.
HarborBandS is offline  
Old 11-13-18, 02:26 PM
  #25  
crank_addict
Senior Member
 
crank_addict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 6,420
Mentioned: 80 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1064 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 18 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by HarborBandS View Post

5. Price. Holy $@$%^#@, bikes have gotten expensive. Back in the 1990's we still sold a crap load of $350 bikes, a smaller number of $500+ bikes, a couple dozen $1,000+ bikes, and had maybe one or two $2,000+ bikes in the shop a year as showpieces that never sold and ultimately ended up in the hands of the shop owner (which he then sold used the following year for a significant price break). Now we are seeing $5,000 or even $10,000+ bikes on my local streets here in the Chicago burbs. Even with inflation-adjusted dollars, it does seem like the prices of bikes have increased quite a bit, and that the higher end is more popular than it used to be.

Compare or avg. out the CPI 1990 to 2018 / avg. 2.5% yr. Then discuss the cost of typical premium frame material of carbon fiber 1990 to 2018.

Yes of course the $10k MSRP bikes exist but if one clears the head of ether, the dollar today for a dang light, super shifting, awesome braking bike is amazing.

You can purchase name brand, NEW but discounted 2018 carbon fiber mtb or road $1200 / 1,500 as example. Quite frankly, its even easier to purchase vs. 1990. Online marketplace has made the advantage to buyer, though less profitable to sellers.

Leads to today's LBS fading away.

Last edited by crank_addict; 11-13-18 at 02:30 PM.
crank_addict is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.