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Early '80's Bike Nashbar Toure MT facelift..

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Early '80's Bike Nashbar Toure MT facelift..

Old 11-12-18, 04:51 PM
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dodgebar
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Early '80's Bike Nashbar Toure MT facelift..

Got an old '84 (83-85?) Bike Nashbar Toure MT. Would like to upgrade many of the components (except frame and wheels) to make it...better/lighter etc.

I'm not a bicycle knowledgable guy, so I'm not sure which parts might work/fit. I know it is a 15 speed with the rear gear set being a total of 5. Came with racing type handlebars, but would like something more "urban". Has center pull brakes and the shifters are on the lower from tube. What would you change do to upgrade the old guy?

any help/ideas/suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
Roger
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Old 11-12-18, 04:59 PM
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Just to help, a similar bike...

https://restoringvintagebicycles.com...hbar-toure-mt/
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Old 11-12-18, 05:11 PM
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That's the beast. Mine is not quite in that nice of shape..but is deserving of some TLC I think, just not sure what if any newer improved components might fit?

thanks!
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Old 11-12-18, 06:33 PM
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Hi Roger-

If you've got that model of bike as pictured in the blog entry above- it's a high quality bike, with mostly high quality parts- There's not a lot to upgrade- since most parts are among the best of their time. There's all kinds of ways to upgrade and refresh a bike- and it's up to you how you do it and how much money you want to put into it.

If you want to sort of keep it the same (sort of period correct-ish)- and just change the handlebars and stuff-

Replace the brake cables and housing, regrease the headset- if you have those wheels and that bottom bracket- they're Suntour sealed bearing units and REALLY really good- but need no refresh until they're grinding. I'd probably replace the brake pads. And new tires- Panaracer Pasela 1 1/4" or Swift Tire 1 3/8" tires are great and look right on a bike like that.

Following that link- if you still have the stock original Mountech rear derailleur- those had a propensity for blowing up. I'd swap that out for a MTB/ATB derailleur- I don't like new modern looking parts mixed in to old bikes- it just looks piecemeal- again- it's your judgement what's cool to you and how much money you want to pump into it...

Something like this rear derailleur looks pretty slick and relatively inexpensive:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-fro...4bJh:rk:4:pf:0

(I've got no affiliation with the seller or auction- just one I found on an ebay search)

As far as handlebars- it's kind of your call if you want flat bars, riser bars, north road bars or something like moustache bars or albatross bars... if you want some riser bars- this looks like kind of a decent deal (I think)- https://www.ebay.com/itm/Ritchey-For...MsF:rk:25:pf:0

It breaks my 'new new stuff' rule- but it's all together (unless you really feel like putting this together piece by piece) and you'll have to replace the shifters-

These look pretty slick to me: https://www.ebay.com/itm/VTG-Suntour...S!-1:rk:3:pf:0

The hardest part, if your bike is like the one in the blog- is going to be how to route your cables- the Symmetric shifter mount causes problems- there used to be cable stops that mounted to that braze on- but they're really hard to find and expensive when you do find them. I guess I'd have to bite the aesthetic thing and mount band mounted cable stop on there, something sorta like this:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Suntour-Cla...yHJ0:rk:5:pf:0



Now- if you wanted to go with indexed (click) shifting... there's a few things you need- you *can* use your existing freewheel and 6 speed shifters- but you'll be missing one gear. I would personally see if a 6 speed Shimano or SunRace freewheel would fit on your rear hub. If so- it makes things nice for you.

I would go with something very similar to these: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Shi...ynBv:rk:5:pf:0

And the matching rear derailleur: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vtg-Shimano...rtl6:rk:2:pf:0

I would also change the middle chain ring to something like a 38. If you can deal with Biopace (elliptical) chainrings- this looks like a pretty decent deal- https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Shi...6L0l:rk:1:pf:0

otherwise look for a 38 tooth 110BCD chainring.

If you have questions- ask!

I'd go through this thread and make a mental list of what looks sweet to you: Show us your Vintage Touring bikes


Good luck!
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Old 11-12-18, 06:34 PM
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Picked one up last month. All I'm doing is swapping the chainrings, chain, and freewheel to gearing more suited to my riding and replacing the cables, housing, brake pads, and tires:



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Old 11-13-18, 08:15 AM
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FYI, the Toure MT was introduced for the 1985 model year. Samples that have surfaced are typically manufactured by Maruishi. Original MSRP was $349 US.
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Old 11-13-18, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
FYI, the Toure MT was introduced for the 1985 model year. Samples that have surfaced are typically manufactured by Maruishi. Original MSRP was $349 US.
CrMo frame/fork, Mountech/Suntour Sealed Bearing hubs and BB at that price range?
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Old 11-13-18, 12:31 PM
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Heres mine, that was a great bike for the next to nothing i got it for. I didnt change much other than the brakes and Brake levers. it was my commuter for a while but decided i didnt need it and the Cannondale T1000 , so the Toure Mt went to a local HS Teacher.

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Old 11-13-18, 12:41 PM
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1) Keep the drop bars. Replace the downtube shifters with a cable stops, and then add a set of SunTour Barcon shifters.
2) A good set of tires, as commented above.
3) Measure chain and determine whether it needs replacing
4) All cables and cable housings once you've settled on the shifters
5) Fresh bar tape after cables are done

Option:

6) Use a gearing calculator (like on Sheldon Brown's site) to portray the gearing combinations that you have right now. It might be that varying the front largest two chainrings will produce better gear range overlap for you, but I don't know.
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Old 12-17-18, 07:24 PM
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Hello - I've recently inherited the same bike from my father and will be going through a similar process. I'm not a bike guy, but am hoping to upgrade the Nashbar to provide me a nice ride to begin triathlon training. I'm not tremendously competitive, but do will need something that will be comfortable and responsive. Will likely purchase a newer bike in the next year or so, but I do want to restore the Nashbar to make it enjoyable as a training bike for years to come - and for the simple nostalgia.

One of the biggest upgrades I want to make will be to the wheels - I plan on keeping the Araya wheels that are on the bike but I want to purchase a new set for the race, as the wheels make a huge difference. However, I realize that the newer wheels out there (Campo Zonda C17s, for instance) appear to only come in a 9-11 speed and I'm concerned about the gearing compatibility. I know the existing cassette won't work, but will it be fairly easy to upgrade the cassette to a 9 speed, so that it can be married to the Zonda hub body? Thoughts and recommendations are appreciated.

Jay
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Old 12-17-18, 08:29 PM
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Hi Jay, you'd be better off getting another race specific bike. There is to much there to upgrade and you would still be racing on a touring bike. I think your dad's bike would be lost in the process.
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Old 12-18-18, 08:31 AM
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^ Agreed, the Nashbar MT is a touring bicycle. As such it's not designed for triathlons. However, since you're "not tremendously competitive", rather than make a large investment in a new bicycle, I'd use it for a season to see how much you enjoy sport. Rather than new wheels, my only modification would be the addition of a set of add-on aero/triathlon handlebars. These will make a far bigger difference than a new set of wheels. If you're still interested in triathlons after the first season, then invest in a more appropriate bicycle and transfer the aero bars.
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Old 12-19-18, 08:29 AM
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Originally Posted by jmerry View Post
I do want to restore the Nashbar to make it enjoyable as a training bike for years to come - and for the simple nostalgia.
For a tri bike- you’re going to want a lightweight, nimble bike- Touring bikes are generally not lightweight and favor stability over being nimble.

Think of using a big ol’ Cadillac in a Rally Cross race instead of something like a WRX. Or a big ol’ Harley Davidson for motocross...

The touring bike is for long distance, leisurely pace, and carrying loads.
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Old 12-20-18, 05:40 PM
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Thanks guys. Yes, I certainly understand the difference in a touring bike versus a tri or road bike. Again, my intent in considering an upgrade to the Nashbar was to avoid buying a new or used out of the gate, as I participated in my first triathlon - so that I would be less financially committed before determining if the sport is something I would like to pursue. The goal would be to take an old touring bike and add a few modifications, that could be reversed, to make it a bit more modern for the aforementioned purpose. I would argue that even modern touring bikes are significantly lighter and more responsive than the Nashbar, underscoring the fact that lighter wheels, better saddle, and so forth would simply assist in making it a better touring bike down the road.

The aero bars are a great idea, and absolutely transferrable. Could the same be said for an upgraded wheelset, per my previous question?

Thanks again everyone.
Jay
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Old 12-20-18, 06:23 PM
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Replacing the wheels is usually one of the most effective improvements you can make on a bike.

But in your case, it is a bit non-trivial because:
  • the rim size is most likely 27" (630mm) rather than 700c (622mm) size
  • your drive train is based around a 5-speed freewheel rather than a cassette
  • your rear dropout spacing is likely 120 or 126mm rather than 130mm
So replacing the wheelset would either lead to a cascade of additional changes to get things sorted, or would require you to purchase a wheelset specific to the bike rather than transferable to a new one.

Perhaps a simpler solution would be to simply upgrade the tires to reduce weight and perhaps handling/feel. What brand/model/size are your current tires? You should be able to find that via the label or markings on the sidewall.

Your choices are limited if indeed 27" tires, which is nearly obsolete. Perhaps 27 x 1-1/4" Continental Gatorskins would be suitable.If actually 700c, then you have an enormous set of choices to balance weight/cost.

Also, be sure to install new tubes if needed, especially if the original tubes are old or heavy due to "slime" used to avoid flats. Reducing rotational mass is the goal, and the Gatorskins have good flat-resistance built in.

Last edited by CO_Hoya; 12-20-18 at 06:29 PM.
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Old 12-20-18, 07:33 PM
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Jay,

That is a cool bike. Well made, nice parts, and it was your dad's. Panaracer makes some fine tires that will fit your nice rims. Skip the new wheelset. A wheelset that fits your bike and the parts it came with will not be an upgrade. I think that after a tune up, your dad's bike will be much faster than you for some time. Ride lots, ask questions here, and I think as you get stronger, you can make better decisions about "upgrades".

Jeff
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