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Really need some help

Old 11-21-18, 10:15 AM
  #1  
NicolaasVandenB
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Really need some help

Hello!
I'm a guy that loves vintage bikes and I would love to restore my old bicycle in the old fashioned and original state.
I live in Belgium Antwerp and have checked the internet to look for some good parts for my bike but I have no real experience with restoring old bikes so I would like some advice!

I have got a Hero bicycle (what is seems like). However I have no clue from what year it is or if it even is a real Hero bicycle.
I have driven this bike for a year and then the front fork got loose.
I have no idea if it is still a possibility to repair it. I have more pictures of the bike but I could only post 10.

Thanks in advance!


This is the logo of the bike, I have no idea from what year it is.



At some spot you can see the (original) painted gold stripes. I think it's original paint, I'm not sure.


At some spot you can see the (original) painted gold stripes. I think it's original paint, I'm not sure.




This is the loose front fork, I think it says Hero Royal. You can see that the loose part of the front fort fits into the orangish part of the bike however it got loose. Is it possible to weld this?


It says Hero, not sure if a real Indian Hero Bike.


The original tire, it says made in India, this is the front tire, the back tire was so teared up that I had to change it.


The back wheel has got 4 loose bicycle spokes, no idea if I can fix these, all advice is appreciated!
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Old 11-21-18, 10:26 AM
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Cool bike!

Fork can be welded back together

Spokes are easily replaced. Make sure they are the same length as the ones they replace.

Welcome to BF!
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Old 11-21-18, 10:50 AM
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That is indeed a cool bike, I especially like the chain ring with the Hero name in it.
I guess everything can be fixed, but could be pricey if you have to outsource the work and not doing it yourself. I would keep as much of the original Patina alive as possible.
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Old 11-21-18, 04:12 PM
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Patina=Paint Brushed Coatiing

Originally Posted by Maytag View Post
I would keep as much of the original Patina alive as possible.
The "patina" looks like a hand painted urethane or similar coating.

The failure of the fork looks to be a poor quality original braze. I wouldn't trust that fork unless it was disassembled and re-brazed by a competent frame builder. That of course would ruin the paint, and... be quite expensive.

This was a very inexpensive urban transportation bike.

I'm sure that you could lots of similar "cool bikes" if not in Belgium then in the Netherlands that would require a lot less work to make them safe to ride. You can also probably find a replacement fork quite inexpensively.

Old adages from rural America: Silk stockings on a rooster... and You can't make a silk purse from a sows ear!

Google translations: zijdekousen op een haan & u **** geen zijdebeurs van het oor van eenvarken maken

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Old 11-22-18, 04:19 AM
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Originally Posted by verktyg View Post
I'm sure that you could lots of similar "cool bikes" if not in Belgium then in the Netherlands that would require a lot less work to make them safe to ride. You can also probably find a replacement fork quite inexpensively.
So if I did understand you correct, you would suggest getting a 'new' bike and save myself lots of work and money instead of trying to repair this bike?
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Old 11-22-18, 04:25 AM
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Originally Posted by 3speedslow View Post
Cool bike!

Fork can be welded back together

Spokes are easily replaced. Make sure they are the same length as the ones they replace.

Welcome to BF!
I've never got any experience with welding myself and I would not be able to do it myself correctly without any mistakes. I really like this bike and it was a joy to ride it! However I would not be able to spend more than 100 euro (around 115 dollars) for the fix. I could go to some garage sales where you can find some hidden pearls and buy a cheap bike there, however as I said before, I really like this bike though.
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Old 11-22-18, 04:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Maytag View Post
That is indeed a cool bike, I especially like the chain ring with the Hero name in it.
I guess everything can be fixed, but could be pricey if you have to outsource the work and not doing it yourself. I would keep as much of the original Patina alive as possible.
This is what I was afraid for I do not want to spend more than 100 euro or approximately 115 dollars, which is already a lot if you know that I bought this bike for 30 euro. It was alright at that time and I only had to fix the saddle and get a 'headlight' (no idea what the front light is in English ).
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Old 11-22-18, 05:07 AM
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Originally Posted by NicolaasVandenB View Post
This is what I was afraid for I do not want to spend more than 100 euro or approximately 115 dollars, which is already a lot if you know that I bought this bike for 30 euro. It was alright at that time and I only had to fix the saddle and get a 'headlight' (no idea what the front light is in English ).
I would scrap the bike and purchase another, as suggested by verktyg. Repair will likely be very expensive if you can't do the work yourself. Maybe worth it on rare and better bike, but it doesn't sound like it would be on yours. Good luck!
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Old 11-22-18, 05:39 AM
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Alright! Thanks for the advice, I'll search for some bikes and if I get a 'new' one, I'll post some pictures of my new catch thank you guys!
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Old 11-22-18, 06:26 AM
  #10  
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Start taking this one apart just for the experience.
What have you got to lose and experience to gain.
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Old 11-22-18, 07:04 AM
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Well... if there's nothing broken on the frame... why not try replacing just the fork? Should be a fairly common size, many other bits can fit off a junker bike of similar shape & size.

If you can't weld or braze... have you heard of JB Weld? Cold weld epoxy... does a decent job gluing metals together (especially dissimilar metals) but best to clean off rust from mating surfaces first.

Broken spokes can be replaced; or swap in a whole wheel if you've got a cheap donor.

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Old 11-22-18, 08:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Tamiya View Post
If you can't weld or braze... have you heard of JB Weld? Cold weld epoxy... does a decent job gluing metals together (especially dissimilar metals) but best to clean off rust from mating surfaces first.
I've fixed a lot of things with JB Weld. A fork would not be one of the places I would use it. It's just not made for that kind of repair or the consequences of failure on a fork.
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Old 11-22-18, 08:10 AM
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Replace the fork. Strip all of the parts off the frame, clean and re-lube everything, and reassemble.
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Old 11-22-18, 08:20 AM
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I'd either take the fork to a someone who really knows what they're doing to fix the fork or throw on a similar fork. If its some rare valuable thing keep the fork and any original parts you remove in case you/the next owner want to make it 100% original again.
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Old 11-22-18, 08:54 AM
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Your fork resembles, and may be identical to, those used on a Raleigh Sports. Available used, in quantity, around here for around $5 = 4.38 Euro, or less. Don
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Old 11-22-18, 08:58 AM
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Originally Posted by John E View Post
Replace the fork. Strip all of the parts off the frame, clean and re-lube everything, and reassemble.
I thought about that however I would like to keep all the original parts together, I know that it might be impossible if I want a safe and driveable bike, but there is just something in my mind that finds it hard to replace it with a random other front fork. I donít know why
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Old 11-22-18, 10:21 AM
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Originally Posted by degan View Post
I'd either take the fork to a someone who really knows what they're doing to fix the fork or throw on a similar fork. If its some rare valuable thing keep the fork and any original parts you remove in case you/the next owner want to make it 100% original again.
Iíll show some pictures to a specialist and let him decide if it is still possible, otherwise Iíll get a new bike, thanks for the tips!
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Old 11-22-18, 10:22 AM
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Originally Posted by ollo_ollo View Post
Your fork resembles, and may be identical to, those used on a Raleigh Sports. Available used, in quantity, around here for around $5 = 4.38 Euro, or less. Don
Hmm if I canít solve the problem with the original part, Iíll check for these front forks and try replacing it! Thanks for the advice!
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Old 11-22-18, 11:00 AM
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Here are a couple of pics of the fork on my Superbe (fancy version of Raleigh Sports) to illustrate.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
IMG_0966.jpg (1.56 MB, 184 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_0970.jpg (1.31 MB, 183 views)
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Old 11-22-18, 02:47 PM
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Transmogrification

Somewhere in the world is a Kia or Tatra patiently awaiting the arrival of your bike.

Transmogrification:









Your Carma ran over my dogma...

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Old 11-22-18, 07:35 PM
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Originally Posted by NicolaasVandenB View Post
So if I did understand you correct, you would suggest getting a 'new' bike and save myself lots of work and money instead of trying to repair this bike?
Yes. Do this, unless you have a huge sentimental attachment to the Hero. It wasn't a high-quality bike to begin with, and for what you'll spend refurbishing this one you can get a pretty nice vintage bike to ride.

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Old 11-22-18, 09:11 PM
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Originally Posted by NicolaasVandenB View Post
So if I did understand you correct, you would suggest getting a 'new' bike and save myself lots of work and money instead of trying to repair this bike?
The key in projects is picking one worth the time and effort. This is not that project. I have spent a lot more than 30 euros on projects that did not work out. I have one I paid over 500 euros for that was a big mistake. I've hung it up on the wall in front of my workshop so I am reminded every day to not do that again.

If you want to start working on bikes, spend some time on the web and you will quickly learn how to spot something good!
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Old 11-23-18, 02:13 AM
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Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
The key in projects is picking one worth the time and effort. This is not that project. I have spent a lot more than 30 euros on projects that did not work out. I have one I paid over 500 euros for that was a big mistake. I've hung it up on the wall in front of my workshop so I am reminded every day to not do that again.

If you want to start working on bikes, spend some time on the web and you will quickly learn how to spot something good!
Oh okay I understand! Letís leave this bike for what it is then if there is no possible way of fixing it without losing too much money on it!
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Old 11-23-18, 05:11 AM
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I think it is better to take it to bike service in order to fir properly.
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Old 11-23-18, 11:33 PM
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Fork Blade To Fork Crown Connection

The fork blade to fork crown connections are the highest stressed joints on a bicycle. Look closely at the brazed areas (gold colored) vs. the rusted areas with no brazing material. It's safe to assume that the other side was poorly brazed too.




The fork was probably dipped in paint rather than spray painted as you can see the black painted area inside the crown and at the inner area inside rear of the fork blade.

If these critical joints were so poorly constructed, what about the rest of the bike?

Also note how thin the wall thickness is on that fork blade, less than 1/2 of even gas pipe tubing.

As mentioned above, unless a bike has value as a rarity (which it doesn't) or sentimental value, it's not worth the effort and Ä to fix it to make it safely rideable.

There were millions of bikes like this produced world wide over the hundred + year span between 1900 and 2000.

"I think it is better to take it to bike service in order to fir properly." HUH?

"If you can't weld or braze... have you heard of JB Weld? Cold weld epoxy... does a decent job gluing metals together (especially dissimilar metals) but best to clean off rust from mating surfaces first."

Less than snarky response:

JB Weld products are epoxy based adhesives and fillers. They have a tensile strength of 5,000 psi. The common variety of JB Weld recommended by C&V contributors is essentially a GLUE!

The weakest aluminum alloy has a tensile strength of 15,000 psi. Aluminum alloy 6061 used for most bike components has a tensile strength of 40,000+ psi.

The lowest strength steels have tensile strengths of ~40,000 psi while alloy steels like Reynold 531 and Columbus tubing are around 125,000 psi.

Brazing alloys for steel range from 40,000 psi up to 70,000 psi.


My rant is with what I call the lazereth syndrome. I've seen it a lot more with folks restoring old cars. There are a number of members who seem obsessed with making suggestions on how to restore a low value bike (fighting entropy).

The suggestion to use JB Weld as a solution for ALL problems in one of the symptoms! Making those STOOPID kinds of suggestions is dangerous!

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