Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

My Latest Resto Project. C & V & cycling-related.

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

My Latest Resto Project. C & V & cycling-related.

Reply

Old 12-04-18, 08:10 AM
  #26  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,494

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 326 Post(s)



Progress pics above. Will apply clear lacquer to boiler and motor before reassembly. Taking the fasteners to hardware store to replace the rusty ones with stainless steel or brass. Placing an order for gaskets etc.

This machine led a hard life. Heating element gasket leaked, causing scale on boiler exterior and pitting rust on the floor of the frame in that corner. Motor casing was also rusty. Lots more rust where the motor mount sits flush on the frame floor. There will be some patina on this machine.

This model is still made. Here's a still from a recent Elektra video.
jyl is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-18, 08:19 AM
  #27  
Honusms 
Senior Member
 
Honusms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 151

Bikes: More than my husband knows about

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Great progress! My Elektra A-3 single group has been a joy for the past 22 years. They are top quality, both mechanically and aesthetically.
Honusms is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-18, 12:53 PM
  #28  
MarcoBianchi 
Senior Member
 
MarcoBianchi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Saragossa. Spain
Posts: 199

Bikes: . Bianchi 28c 1980. Coppi Giro di Lombardia. Vitoria Vintage 1990. Orbea Luarca 1977. Trek 950.

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
You will need this!
https://www.redbubble.com/es/people/...ef_id=25190407
MarcoBianchi is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-18, 12:56 PM
  #29  
MarcoBianchi 
Senior Member
 
MarcoBianchi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Saragossa. Spain
Posts: 199

Bikes: . Bianchi 28c 1980. Coppi Giro di Lombardia. Vitoria Vintage 1990. Orbea Luarca 1977. Trek 950.

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Or maybe this:
https://www.etsy.com/es/listing/2482...coffee-grinder
MarcoBianchi is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-18, 01:38 AM
  #30  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,494

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 326 Post(s)

jyl is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-18, 01:42 AM
  #31  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,494

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 326 Post(s)
Well I kind of eff'd up. Buffed the boiler as you see above. Then I sprayed it with clear lacquer to protect from oxidation, but didn't do it right (too cold in garage) and the boiler is now a shiny satin copper. I am disappointed but am going to stop obsessing for now and proceed with reassembly. I can always remove the lacquer with acetone, even after the machine is in operation, and try applying lacquer again.
jyl is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-18, 01:43 AM
  #32  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,494

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 326 Post(s)

jyl is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-18, 01:35 AM
  #33  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,494

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 326 Post(s)


Frame looks a lot nicer now, it was very rusty


I sprayed boiler with clear lacquer but it was too cold in the garage and the lacquer ended up more of a satin finish, too bad as the naked boiler was nearly a mirror finish. I might use acetone to strip off the lacquer and try again.


I was worried I wouldn't get the lines in the right places but it was easy enough. Fittings not tightened down yet.


Groups, as found. I am not sure if these should be completely disassembled and every o-ring replaced, or if they should simply be cleaned up and then replace stuff if they don't work.


Valves as found. I need to find a used hot water valve.

Here's where we are. Going to turn to the groups and valves now. Then the electrical and last the exterior.
jyl is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-18, 05:18 AM
  #34  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 20,127
Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7082 Post(s)
You're doing some amazing work!!!!

It will almost be a shame to cover up all that copper work.

I picked this up a couple of years ago, hoping to build up an espresso cart. Or, perhaps merging coffee with another small business. But, alas, I stopped drinking coffee within a few months of that.

I still have my niece in mind who might be just about old enough for a summer job.

I'd like to preheat the hot water with solar.



I suppose I'm living in a lost time, but when I was in Italy, there were no button operated espresso machines. No one button does all machines. It was all these lever operated machines.

One note about the old machines. They were all made for short cups. You could probably rebuild for tall cups if you desired.
CliffordK is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-18, 05:55 AM
  #35  
jimmuller 
What??? Only 2 wheels?
 
jimmuller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Boston-ish, MA
Posts: 12,852

Bikes: '73 Raleigh Carlton Gran Sport, '72 Peugeot UO-8, '82 Peugeot TH8, '87 Bianchi Brava, '76? Masi Grand Criterium, '87 Centurion Ironman Expert, '74 Motobecane Champion Team, '86 Gazelle champion mondial, '81? Grandis, '82? Tommasini, '83 Peugeot PFN10

Mentioned: 158 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 965 Post(s)
Authentic steampunk! Way cool!
__________________
Real cyclists use toe clips.
With great bikes comes great responsibility.
jimmuller
jimmuller is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-18, 06:49 AM
  #36  
MiloFrance 
Not riding enough
 
MiloFrance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Capestang, France
Posts: 1,010

Bikes: Lots of French, some British and a couple of Italian

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 126 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Lascauxcaveman View Post
Not really my cup of tea.
I see what you did there...

Fabulous project, if I had the skills and the space...
__________________
I'm on holiday whenever I ride my bike
MiloFrance is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-18, 11:44 PM
  #37  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,494

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 326 Post(s)
Four M4 steel screws are rusted and broken off in the group bodies. These are supposed to be brass screws but there's a lot of bodgy stuff been done to this machine. Sky is going to help me drill out and retap the holes and I'll use stainless bolts. One of the group solenoids and one of the valves look bad and replacements are on order. All the gaskets look pretty perished. All stuff we're used to in C&V, eh?
jyl is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-18, 11:47 PM
  #38  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,494

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 326 Post(s)
Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
You're doing some amazing work!!!!

It will almost be a shame to cover up all that copper work.

I picked this up a couple of years ago, hoping to build up an espresso cart. Or, perhaps merging coffee with another small business. But, alas, I stopped drinking coffee within a few months of that.

I still have my niece in mind who might be just about old enough for a summer job.

I'd like to preheat the hot water with solar.



I suppose I'm living in a lost time, but when I was in Italy, there were no button operated espresso machines. No one button does all machines. It was all these lever operated machines.

One note about the old machines. They were all made for short cups. You could probably rebuild for tall cups if you desired.
That's quite a machine! Does the location tight under the cabinet create any problem? Heat, moisture, etc? I'm eventually going to have to face the issue of where can I install my machine...
jyl is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-18, 11:52 PM
  #39  
gugie 
Crapmaster Emeritus
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 6,605

Bikes: JP Weigle'd Raleigh Competition reconstruct, 73 Raleigh Competition 650b'ed, 96 Bike Friday NWT, 83 Lotus Classique, 78 Centurion ProTour, 73 Raleigh Grand Sports

Mentioned: 625 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1864 Post(s)
If’n any brazing be needed, L’Atelier gratis, just cause worthy project
gugie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-18, 11:55 PM
  #40  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,494

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 326 Post(s)
The buttons (electronic controls) are a potential obstacle for this project. If they turn out to be non working, each of the two sets costs $500...

However, all they do - AFAIK - is control how much volume of water is delivered to the group. There are flowmeters that measure the volume and solenoids that open and close the valves.

So my backup plan, if the electronic controls don't work, is to replace with something homebrew. I don't know anything about Arduino computers but I'm sure it wouldn't be toooo hard.
jyl is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-18, 11:57 PM
  #41  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,494

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 326 Post(s)
Originally Posted by gugie View Post
If’n any brazing be needed, L’Atelier gratis, just cause worthy project
Thank you! I didn't realize Gugificazione extended to espresso machines. That's a very Italian business empire you are building!
jyl is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-18, 01:07 AM
  #42  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 20,127
Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7082 Post(s)
Originally Posted by jyl View Post


That's quite a machine! Does the location tight under the cabinet create any problem? Heat, moisture, etc? I'm eventually going to have to face the issue of where can I install my machine...
Well... as I mentioned, it hasn't particularly been a problem since I pretty much quit drinking coffee a few months after the purchase. I do drink some decaf, but don't drink much at home.

The machine really is a commercial size. It might be nice for a group event, but I'm not sure I could drink 5 gallons of espresso in a day.

At some point, I should probably tear it down and clean and inspect everything as you're doing. Double check gaskets, seals,etc.

That is a good point, if I do get it hooked up, I may need to find a more open place for it.

Are you redesigning yours so the inside copperwork will be visible once it is assembled? Or is that the thing now, to leave the insides skeletal and open?

How will the lacquer deal with heat? It shouldn't get that hot, but would repeatedly hit boiling, or a little over boiling.
CliffordK is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-18, 01:27 AM
  #43  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 20,127
Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7082 Post(s)
Originally Posted by jyl View Post
The buttons (electronic controls) are a potential obstacle for this project. If they turn out to be non working, each of the two sets costs $500...

However, all they do - AFAIK - is control how much volume of water is delivered to the group. There are flowmeters that measure the volume and solenoids that open and close the valves.

So my backup plan, if the electronic controls don't work, is to replace with something homebrew. I don't know anything about Arduino computers but I'm sure it wouldn't be toooo hard.
Hopefully the electronics aren't that complicated. Let's see, yours is a 1993... hopefully not fully computerized.

I'd anticipate that behind your button covers, you will find a row of small cube shaped buttons.

In some cases, those little cubes can be disassembled and cleaned without disturbing the underlying circuitry. Or, should only cost pennies to replace.

I'm not sure how they would have achieved flow and dosing, but it could be rather simple. Electra may also be able to provide complete wiring diagrams.
CliffordK is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-18, 07:55 AM
  #44  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,494

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 326 Post(s)
Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
Well... as I mentioned, it hasn't particularly been a problem since I pretty much quit drinking coffee a few months after the purchase. I do drink some decaf, but don't drink much at home.

The machine really is a commercial size. It might be nice for a group event, but I'm not sure I could drink 5 gallons of espresso in a day.

At some point, I should probably tear it down and clean and inspect everything as you're doing. Double check gaskets, seals,etc.

That is a good point, if I do get it hooked up, I may need to find a more open place for it.

Are you redesigning yours so the inside copperwork will be visible once it is assembled? Or is that the thing now, to leave the insides skeletal and open?

How will the lacquer deal with heat? It shouldn't get that hot, but would repeatedly hit boiling, or a little over boiling.
I have not decided whether to modify so as to expose the innards. The easiest way would be to make a plexiglass (acrylic) or tempered glass replacement for the warming shelf. Plexiglass panels are also possible. Someone has suggested operating it naked, steampunk style, which is intriguing but 240v 30A...

Or we could just quote Longfellow

"In the elder days of Art,
Builders wrought with greatest care
Each minute and unseen part;
For the Gods see everywhere."

Lacquer should be fine, cookware and coffee makers are commonly lacquer coated to protect brass and copper. Remember "Revereware" pots and pans, from our childhood, the "copper bottom" cookware? My grandmother liked that stuff.
jyl is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-18, 08:54 AM
  #45  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 20,127
Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7082 Post(s)
I had thought about plexiglass, but would be concerned about heat and plastic, especially heat+plastic+loading it down with weight.

Where was this photo taken?


Hmm... I see the danger electricity signs in the background

I've been shocked many times by 110V power, and lived to tell the tale. It worries me, but hurts less than an electric fence. The USA, of course, uses grounded 240V. So, either lead + ground ==> shock. Both leads may well be necessary for a significant danger.

You could add conduit, and some kind of cover over any bare electrical contacts, even if the cover is just partial, but blocks easy access.

But, you're right. You can console yourself on a job well done, even if unseen.
CliffordK is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-18, 09:02 AM
  #46  
gugie 
Crapmaster Emeritus
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 6,605

Bikes: JP Weigle'd Raleigh Competition reconstruct, 73 Raleigh Competition 650b'ed, 96 Bike Friday NWT, 83 Lotus Classique, 78 Centurion ProTour, 73 Raleigh Grand Sports

Mentioned: 625 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1864 Post(s)
Originally Posted by jyl View Post


Thank you! I didn't realize Gugificazione extended to espresso machines. That's a very Italian business empire you are building!
I like a free cuppa joe like anybody.
gugie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-18, 11:31 AM
  #47  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,494

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 326 Post(s)

Photo is a still from a video of Elektra factory. They still make this machine.

I've seen pics of machines modded with acrylic side panels, so the temps are probably okay.

I think I'd be nervous about electrical risk if the panels are totally removed.

Anyway that call is a ways off. I'm only about 25% of the way through this resto.

I have access to a laser engraving machine. Can give daughter an Illustrator file and have her use the machine at school. Thinking what can do with that as well.

Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
I had thought about plexiglass, but would be concerned about heat and plastic, especially heat+plastic+loading it down with weight.

Where was this photo taken?


Hmm... I see the danger electricity signs in the background

I've been shocked many times by 110V power, and lived to tell the tale. It worries me, but hurts less than an electric fence. The USA, of course, uses grounded 240V. So, either lead + ground ==> shock. Both leads may well be necessary for a significant danger.

You could add conduit, and some kind of cover over any bare electrical contacts, even if the cover is just partial, but blocks easy access.

But, you're right. You can console yourself on a job well done, even if unseen.

Last edited by jyl; 12-07-18 at 02:08 PM.
jyl is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-18, 11:43 AM
  #48  
noobinsf 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 917

Bikes: '04 Felt SR91, '82 Univega Competizione, '72 Motobecane Grand Record, '72 Puch Bergmeister

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 244 Post(s)
Originally Posted by jyl View Post


Thank you! I didn't realize Gugificazione extended to espresso machines.

noobinsf is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-18, 04:37 PM
  #49  
madpogue
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Madison, WI USA
Posts: 1,840
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 201 Post(s)
Originally Posted by jyl View Post
I have not decided whether to modify so as to expose the innards. The easiest way would be to make a plexiglass (acrylic) or tempered glass replacement for the warming shelf. Plexiglass panels are also possible. Someone has suggested operating it naked, steampunk style, which is intriguing but 240v 30A...
What about an open frame with painted open-mesh screening where the panels would be? Should be insulated, offer some visibility to the innards, and would definitely carry the steampunk look.
madpogue is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-18, 05:31 PM
  #50  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 20,127
Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7082 Post(s)
I might worry about 212°+ tanks and tubes rather than the electricity.

Perhaps @gugie could braze up some expanded steel panels.

It actually should be an easy project for almost anybody, although the tricky thing would be to design a mount that could be opened for cleaning (with adequate safety procedures for power and heat).

Perhaps with that in mind, just leave it closed.

The plexiglass does sound neat though. It may depend a bit on whether the back side will actually be visible and/or accessible.
CliffordK is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service