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Normandy Lux Competition Hubs opinion

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Normandy Lux Competition Hubs opinion

Old 11-29-18, 02:07 AM
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Cycologist
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Normandy Lux Competition Hubs opinion

I have been using these hubs since they are standard on my 60-70's Peugeot PX10's. But was wondering how good are these hubs actually. I took my new 71 PX10 with Normandy L. Competition hubs laced to a Mavic E tubular rims out for a ride and was so impressed with the ride. Also impressive was the smoothness and the amount of speed I was able to generate.


It got me thinking what hubs and rims would Eddy Merckx raced with the PX10. I always assumed that the Campagnolo Record hub was a superior hub when compared to the Normandy Lux. Comp. I'm using both the red and gold label and can't tell a difference.

Was the Normandy Lux. Comp equivalent to the Tipo Nuevo hubs? And was the Campagnolo Record hub of same year far superior?
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Old 11-29-18, 02:33 AM
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I'd say that Competitions are nicer than Tipo hubs, but not as nice as Campy Record hubs. No doubt some BF member knows the detailed differences in specifications.

You aren't going to feel the difference from the hubs when you are riding. The mechanical friction is nearly infinitesimal compared to everything else. Better hubs used better materials, fully hardened races, precision bearings, etc. They would as a result last a lot longer and hold up to being ridden massive miles. Campy hubs were also precise enough that they were glass smooth when spun. You could barely feel them turn. Very unusual at the time.
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Old 11-29-18, 01:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Salamandrine View Post
I'd say that Competitions are nicer than Tipo hubs, but not as nice as Campy Record hubs. No doubt some BF member knows the detailed differences in specifications.

You aren't going to feel the difference from the hubs when you are riding. The mechanical friction is nearly infinitesimal compared to everything else. Better hubs used better materials, fully hardened races, precision bearings, etc. They would as a result last a lot longer and hold up to being ridden massive miles. Campy hubs were also precise enough that they were glass smooth when spun. You could barely feel them turn. Very unusual at the time.
---

+1

From what I have been able to make out the Luxe Competition was produced in four generations.

The very earliest ones did not have the oil hole and oil hole clip but did have the relieved flanges. Have only ever seen Rebour drawings of these, never and actual set, either in person or in photos. They were also sold badged as Milremo.

By 1967 the second generation with the oil hole was out, do not know a specific launch date.

The third generation with the gold foil label seemed to launch in ~1970.

The red label fourth generation launched ~1973 and only seemed to enjoy a brief production life.

Suspect Luxe Competition discontinued sometime subsequent to the 1973 launch of the Maillard 700, which ironically was produced by Perrin for Maillard.

-----
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Old 11-29-18, 01:59 PM
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Tipo hubs had accurately machined cones, but the cups were stamped and made precise adjustment more hit/miss.

The better Maillard-built hubs seem to feature good machining. The ones with plastic dust shields may require glue to hold the aged/shrunken shields in place.

As with any hubs, the key to long life is leaving enough freeplay in the bearing adjiustment so that the play only disappears as the quick-release lever compresses the axle.
Failure to allow for axle compression will shorten the life of any hub and result in immediate tight and rough turning even before the actual damage sets in.
The other key to long life is preventing water intrusion and keeping the grease from getting too contaminated from use.
Using the right amount of grease allows the balls to rotate free of the bulk of the grease load. Most of the grease gets pushed aside and remains stationary in the hubshell, acting as a barrier to dust and water.

Beware of French-made hubs having "metric" or French freewheel threading. Confirm French threading using a 1mm thread gage, or use a non-Campagnolo standard front or rear axle as a thread gage (observing complete meshing of the threads in front of a lighted background).
Standard (English or Italian) freewheel threading will mesh with a 24tpi gage (or with an English or Italian bottom bracket cup's threads).

Last edited by dddd; 11-29-18 at 02:07 PM.
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Old 11-30-18, 06:03 AM
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Do NOT try to remove the dust shields.
Don't ask me how I know that.

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(looking for a picture and not seeing it? Thank the Photobucket fiasco.PM me and I'll link it up.)
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Old 11-30-18, 07:39 AM
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Originally Posted by top506 View Post
Do NOT try to remove the dust shields.
Don't ask me how I know that.

Top
lol

yep thems were the first hubs I repacked and most difficult, they are a pain to clean out.
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Old 11-30-18, 07:50 AM
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Needs a photo don’t you think?
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Old 11-30-18, 06:50 PM
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Nice and smooth spinning but if you leave them unattended and the cups go bad...there's no help for these: AFAIK you either can't press old cups out and/or never can find replacement cups even if you could! Too bad that they didn't see the light and make them serviceable as Campy did, there might be a lot more still on the road!
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Old 11-30-18, 08:44 PM
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Excellent information from everyone. I was on a quest to find some Record Hubs for the bike but after reading the comments, It doesn't seem like I will achieve much. The Lux is probably what Eddy Merckx had on his PX 10.

The picture above looks fantastic. It's nice to see a polished set. As far as the cups are concerned. Where are the cups. I remember re-lubing these at one point. But what would be the "cup" not to remove.
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Old 11-30-18, 09:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Cycologist View Post
Excellent information from everyone. I was on a quest to find some Record Hubs for the bike but after reading the comments, It doesn't seem like I will achieve much. The Lux is probably what Eddy Merckx had on his PX 10.

The picture above looks fantastic. It's nice to see a polished set. As far as the cups are concerned. Where are the cups. I remember re-lubing these at one point. But what would be the "cup" not to remove.
The cups are the steel races pressed inside the hub shell. BITD, most people just tossed campy hubs once the steel races had worn out. It took a very long time if the hubs were properly maintained. They could be replaced if you wanted to go to the trouble. Cones did get replaced regularly.

The dust shields are a different thing entirely. It's the shield over the ball bearings on the outside of the hubs. On campy hubs, it's pretty easy to pop out the dust shield to make cleaning out the old dirty grease and repacking the bearings easier. I prefer to leave them in place, and just stick the end of a rag in there to clean it up. Faster overall, and less chance of denting the shields.
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Old 11-30-18, 09:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Salamandrine View Post
The cups are the steel races pressed inside the hub shell. BITD, most people just tossed campy hubs once the steel races had worn out. It took a very long time if the hubs were properly maintained. They could be replaced if you wanted to go to the trouble. Cones did get replaced regularly.

The dust shields are a different thing entirely. It's the shield over the ball bearings on the outside of the hubs. On campy hubs, it's pretty easy to pop out the dust shield to make cleaning out the old dirty grease and repacking the bearings easier. I prefer to leave them in place, and just stick the end of a rag in there to clean it up. Faster overall, and less chance of denting the shields.

Good to know. I have a pair I'm getting together for a 1950's PLX10. Although not original to the bike. Finding the original parts are cost prohibitive.
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