Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

1976 Motobecane Super Mirage

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

1976 Motobecane Super Mirage

Reply

Old 01-07-19, 01:03 PM
  #51  
Cheseldine
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Originally Posted by SurferRosa View Post
Overhaul the headset. Take one of the headset bearings to your LBS and ask them the size. Then buy the number you need to refill both headset retainers.
Originally Posted by Aubergine View Post

If your headset is sticking a bit, the better option is to replace the retainers with loose bearings. You can fit in more bearings, which both help bear the stresses better and ride over any small pits in the races. If you do this, donít jam in the bearings; there must be a small gap between the bearings so that the balls can roll freely on the races.
Perfect, I can certainly do this. I did see where Sheldon talks about replacing the caged bearings with loose ones. Is there a particular grease you folks recommend, or can I use standard automotive wheel bearing grease I have on hand?
Cheseldine is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-19, 01:06 PM
  #52  
Cheseldine
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Salamandrine View Post
The easy option is to use the previously recommended Kool Stop Continental brake pads.

Alternatively, Kool Stop sells replacement brake blocks for Weinmann brake pads holders. IOW you keep the original metal pad holders, and replace the rubber part only. There were several variants. You would need to take your current pads out and measure them to ensure you get the right size. A bench vise is the easiest way to get the old pads out. If you aren't confident about doing this, get the Continental pads.
These are the ones you are talking about? Are these the inserts that would go in my old metal housings, or do these not use a metal housing of their own?
Cheseldine is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-19, 01:09 PM
  #53  
SurferRosa
Senior Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 169

Bikes: old school roadies

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 64 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Cheseldine View Post
Is there a particular grease you folks recommend?
Everyone has his favorite. This isn't my favorite (that's Campy), but this is what I use:

park tools ppl-1
SurferRosa is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-19, 01:10 PM
  #54  
SurferRosa
Senior Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 169

Bikes: old school roadies

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 64 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Cheseldine View Post
These are the ones you are talking about? Are these the inserts that would go in my old metal housings, or do these not use a metal housing of their own?
If you look at the photo, the continental pads have integrated bolts (and nuts). So they work without shoes.

I've also had really good luck with these (made by kool-stop): skyway tuff pads.

Last edited by SurferRosa; 01-07-19 at 01:14 PM.
SurferRosa is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-19, 06:31 PM
  #55  
Cheseldine
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Originally Posted by SurferRosa View Post
If you look at the photo, the continental pads have integrated bolts (and nuts). So they work without shoes.

I've also had really good luck with these (made by kool-stop): skyway tuff pads.
Great info, thank you very much!

I've run into another slight problem... I was gently flexing the spokes on the front wheel (they feel much much looser than the rear wheel) and one of them broke in half. It must have been very brittle. At this point do you folks think I should:

1) Purchase all new spokes and learn how to relace the wheel (I don't trust the others since the one was so brittle)
2) Purchase another set of 27" wheels
3) Purchase a set of 700c 120mm wheels

How much does a decent set of 120mm wheels cost? I know I'll have to adjust the brakes (hopefully I have an additional 4mm of reach on the levers). I see wheel sets listed as 100 and 126mm, but mine appear to be 95 and 120mm.

If I am reading this correctly something like this would work if it was 5mm narrower:

http://www.velomine.com/index.php?ma...oducts_id=2529

Last edited by Cheseldine; 01-07-19 at 06:35 PM.
Cheseldine is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-19, 07:06 PM
  #56  
SurferRosa
Senior Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 169

Bikes: old school roadies

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 64 Post(s)
Unless the rims are in remarkable shape, few will recommend rebuilding old 27" rims with new spokes. It's a lot of work to later find out you should have simply bought new rims that might've just cost $35/ea.

Try to find a donor bike with better 27" wheels on your local craigs. Don't toss your old wheels. Either keep them or at least keep the hubs (assuming they're a matching set). You may want to rebuild the hubs using new rims and spokes as many do.

It looks like your pads are already at their lowest point in your calipers, so a 700c conversion may require different brakes. Personally, I don't think this frame warrants that kind of investment.
SurferRosa is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-19, 07:12 PM
  #57  
Raleigh74 
Senior Member
 
Raleigh74's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Greenville, SC / Asheville, NC
Posts: 172

Bikes: '74 Raleigh Professional, '73 Raleigh Grand Prix, '84 Nishiki Medalist, '85 Gazelle Champion Mondial AB, '81 Peugeot Course, '79 Univega Gran Rally

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Itís entirely up to you. Finding a replacement wheelset would be much easier, but more costly. As you found out, the smallest rear hub spacing you can get in a new wheel set is 126mm. So, thatís another thing to think about. Cold setting the rear dropouts to 126 from 120 is an option, but also work and you have to check alignment as well.

Iíve bought used wheel sets off eBay before with success, so thereís also that option. But, you certainly donít want to end up with another set that needs to be relaced right away...so be picky and be sure they are the correct hub width if youíre sticking with 120mm.

700c provides better tire selection, and generally I like the ride a bit more. As you said, verify the brake caliper reach if you go that route.

Oh, and I prefer marine grease. But regular automotive grease will work, the important thing is that things are lubricated.

Last edited by Raleigh74; 01-07-19 at 07:16 PM.
Raleigh74 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-19, 07:19 PM
  #58  
Salamandrine 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 4,434

Bikes: 78 Masi Criterium, 68 PX10, 2016 Mercian King of Mercia, Rivendell Clem Smith Jr

Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1504 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Cheseldine View Post
These are the ones you are talking about? Are these the inserts that would go in my old metal housings, or do these not use a metal housing of their own?
Yeah, those are the Continental Kool Stops. They don't need the metal housings. They bolt right on; no housing/holders needed. So that's choice A, the slightly easier way. These actually date back to the 70s so technically it's vintage correct.

Choice B is to use the existing metal holders, and find the correct Weinmann replacement pads/inserts for them, also sold by kool stop.
There are a few Weinmann insert sizes, so best to be able to measure the original rubber insert pads with a caliper. Most likely yours are 'X' or 4 dot. Here are 4 dots.
Salamandrine is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-19, 07:31 PM
  #59  
Cheseldine
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Originally Posted by SurferRosa View Post
Unless the rims are in remarkable shape, few will recommend rebuilding old 27" rims with new spokes. It's a lot of work to later find out you should have simply bought new rims that might've just cost $35/ea.

Try to find a donor bike with better 27" wheels on your local craigs. Don't toss your old wheels. Either keep them or at least keep the hubs (assuming they're a matching set). You may want to rebuild the hubs using new rims and spokes as many do.

It looks like your pads are already at their lowest point in your calipers, so a 700c conversion may require different brakes. Personally, I don't think this frame warrants that kind of investment.
Originally Posted by Raleigh74 View Post
Itís entirely up to you. Finding a replacement wheelset would be much easier, but more costly. As you found out, the smallest rear hub spacing you can get in a new wheel set is 126mm. So, thatís another thing to think about. Cold setting the rear dropouts to 126 from 120 is an option, but also work and you have to check alignment as well.

Iíve bought used wheel sets off eBay before with success, so thereís also that option. But, you certainly donít want to end up with another set that needs to be relaced right away...so be picky and be sure they are the correct hub width if youíre sticking with 120mm.

700c provides better tire selection, and generally I like the ride a bit more. As you said, verify the brake caliper reach if you go that route.

Oh, and I prefer marine grease. But regular automotive grease will work, the important thing is that things are lubricated.
Do you typically find it more cost effective to buy new 27" rims and spokes to lace to the existing hubs or to buy entirely new wheels?
Cheseldine is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-19, 08:16 PM
  #60  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 4,636

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 531 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Cheseldine View Post
Perfect, I can certainly do this. I did see where Sheldon talks about replacing the caged bearings with loose ones. Is there a particular grease you folks recommend, or can I use standard automotive wheel bearing grease I have on hand?
If you have automotive wheel bearing grease in stock that works. If you have to buy something, get marine boat trailer grease.
dedhed is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-19, 08:18 PM
  #61  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 4,636

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 531 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Cheseldine View Post
Do you typically find it more cost effective to buy new 27" rims and spokes to lace to the existing hubs or to buy entirely new wheels?
Depending on where you live buying a craigslist donor bike is often cost effective
dedhed is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-19, 09:22 PM
  #62  
Cheseldine
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
Depending on where you live buying a craigslist donor bike is often cost effective
That's my problem, I live in a smaller town in northwest Montana. The craigslist market for older bikes is pretty non-existant so I have to pursue other avenues.
Cheseldine is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-19, 09:31 PM
  #63  
SurferRosa
Senior Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 169

Bikes: old school roadies

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 64 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Cheseldine View Post
Do you typically find it more cost effective to buy new 27" rims and spokes to lace to the existing hubs or to buy entirely new wheels?
Generally, new hubs I can afford are cheap and gross, and vintage hubs add tons and tons of character to a vintage bike, so it's not even an issue. So, yeah, I always rebuild with vintage hubs and new rims. If you can find nos vintage rims in good shape, that's even better, but those are often pretty costly, too.
SurferRosa is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-19, 10:03 PM
  #64  
Raleigh74 
Senior Member
 
Raleigh74's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Greenville, SC / Asheville, NC
Posts: 172

Bikes: '74 Raleigh Professional, '73 Raleigh Grand Prix, '84 Nishiki Medalist, '85 Gazelle Champion Mondial AB, '81 Peugeot Course, '79 Univega Gran Rally

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Cheseldine View Post
Do you typically find it more cost effective to buy new 27" rims and spokes to lace to the existing hubs or to buy entirely new wheels?
If you have the time, relacing would be more cost effective. But itís not for everyone and not the easiest thing. I would honestly consider looking for a decent used set to get you on the road. Someone on this forum may even have a 27Ē set laying around for a fair price. Maybe post on the C&V sales sub forum.
Raleigh74 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-19, 11:39 PM
  #65  
Cheseldine
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Would something like this work with my Normandy hubs?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Weinmann-LP18-27-inch-36H-Aluminum-Bike-Rims-Pair/401403790097?epid=1721072974&hash=item5d7587c311:g:HWgAAOSw-jFaHFrC

Or do you guys need more info to tell?
Cheseldine is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-19, 12:04 AM
  #66  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 7,910

Bikes: Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel, Centurion Ironman Expert

Mentioned: 128 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2335 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Cheseldine View Post
So far I've ordered the Jagwire Road Pro kit for the cables and housing, and a SRAM PC 850 replacement chain.
Eventually you'll find it more cost effective to order bulk packs of cables and housings, especially since Jagwire cable kits increased in price a year or so ago -- as a result REI quit stocking those and substituted a cheaper cable/housing kit under their house brand. For the price of two Jagwire cable kits I ordered mini-bulk rolls of Jagwire and Sunlite shifter and brake cable housings (enough to do 10 bikes, fewer with those like the Ironman using full length brake cable housings), Sunshine brand stainless steel shift and brake cables. Just replacing the small bit of shifter cable housing on my Ironman and opening the loop a little more in diameter really helped smooth out the index shifting.

I haven't tried SRAM chains but have been satisfied with KMC Z33 and Z50, but the Z51 and Z72 cost only a little more and include the handy Missing Link quick link.

I know you folks recommend the Kool Stop Salmon break pads, but I am unsure which ones fit. Should I go with the square-ish block style or the longer curved ones?
Jagwire pads are just as good and cost less -- especially the long, thin pads that are curved to match the rim radius. Except for the Kool Stop Eagle 2 (Eagle Claw) pads for cantilever brakes -- nobody else makes a pad quite like it for old school mountain bikes and any bike with canti brakes.

Also, the front fork has a tendency to stick in the middle position indicating worn bearing races according to Sheldon. How can I tell which new races will fit?
Sometimes that's due to overtightening the bearing cups, cones, etc. Almost every time I've disassembled a bearing component that felt gritty and grindy (hubs, bottom brackets, headsets), it turned out to be grossly overtightened. No problems with debris. If there was damage or pitting it was caused by careless assembly and cranking down too much on the lockrings. It takes a little finesse to set the pressure just right -- where there's no slop but the bearing still move smoothly -- then hold it there with one wrench while tightening the lock ring. Usually takes me a few tries to get it just right but it's worth the effort to get it right because it won't need to be done again for a long time.

But headsets can be infiltrated with water, mud wasp nests, etc., so it's worth disassembling to check it out. If the retainer ring bearings and races look reasonably good I'd just clean, regrease and reassemble the original components.

Originally Posted by SurferRosa View Post
Possibly. But he hasn't overhauled the headset, so he doesn't know if the retainers pose any issue. I would overhaul it with the retainers in place, and if it isn't smooth, then disassemble again and use loose balls. Unlike a bottom bracket, I try to stay away from loose balls in a headset. It's an unnecessary headache.

But if he sees indexing or pitting in the races, using loose balls might be a better first choice than replacing the component.
Agreed. I've never needed to replace any bearing retainers. I'll check 'em with a magnifying glass but they've always been fine. I do replace loose bearings whenever I reassemble a hub or BB, but it's probably not necessary.

Originally Posted by Cheseldine View Post
Perfect, I can certainly do this. I did see where Sheldon talks about replacing the caged bearings with loose ones. Is there a particular grease you folks recommend, or can I use standard automotive wheel bearing grease I have on hand?
I'm partial to Phil's just because I've used it since the 1970s. But any marine grease would do. No matter how fast we ride we're not going to stress out any bicycle bearings or exceed the capacity of grease. I just want something that resists water infiltration and lasts a long time.

I get annoyed when I disassemble a bearing component and find it dry or nearly dry, and it appears to have left the factory that way. Grease is cheap. Fill up that cup until it overflows, then wipe the excess. Check it again after a few rides and wipe the excess that extrudes out. It'll be good for years for most of us.
canklecat is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-19, 12:20 AM
  #67  
Aubergine 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Seattle and Reims
Posts: 2,440

Bikes: Too many to list

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 581 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Cheseldine View Post
Would something like this work with my Normandy hubs?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Weinmann-LP...gAAOSw-jFaHFrC

Or do you guys need more info to tell?
They would work fine. But before you change rims, does your bike have steel rims? I was always of the impression that the Super Mirage had aluminum rims. If so, there is no need to change a thing.
__________________
Keeping Seattleís bike shops in business since 1978
Aubergine is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-19, 03:56 AM
  #68  
SurferRosa
Senior Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 169

Bikes: old school roadies

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 64 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Cheseldine View Post
Looks like a good deal to me.

You will learn a lot building new wheels. Probably the best investment you can make.
SurferRosa is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-19, 10:32 AM
  #69  
Cheseldine
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Aubergine View Post

They would work fine. But before you change rims, does your bike have steel rims? I was always of the impression that the Super Mirage had aluminum rims. If so, there is no need to change a thing.
Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
Eventually you'll find it more cost effective to order bulk packs of cables and housings, especially since Jagwire cable kits increased in price a year or so ago -- as a result REI quit stocking those and substituted a cheaper cable/housing kit under their house brand. For the price of two Jagwire cable kits I ordered mini-bulk rolls of Jagwire and Sunlite shifter and brake cable housings (enough to do 10 bikes, fewer with those like the Ironman using full length brake cable housings), Sunshine brand stainless steel shift and brake cables. Just replacing the small bit of shifter cable housing on my Ironman and opening the loop a little more in diameter really helped smooth out the index shifting.

I haven't tried SRAM chains but have been satisfied with KMC Z33 and Z50, but the Z51 and Z72 cost only a little more and include the handy Missing Link quick link.



Jagwire pads are just as good and cost less -- especially the long, thin pads that are curved to match the rim radius. Except for the Kool Stop Eagle 2 (Eagle Claw) pads for cantilever brakes -- nobody else makes a pad quite like it for old school mountain bikes and any bike with canti brakes.



Sometimes that's due to overtightening the bearing cups, cones, etc. Almost every time I've disassembled a bearing component that felt gritty and grindy (hubs, bottom brackets, headsets), it turned out to be grossly overtightened. No problems with debris. If there was damage or pitting it was caused by careless assembly and cranking down too much on the lockrings. It takes a little finesse to set the pressure just right -- where there's no slop but the bearing still move smoothly -- then hold it there with one wrench while tightening the lock ring. Usually takes me a few tries to get it just right but it's worth the effort to get it right because it won't need to be done again for a long time.

But headsets can be infiltrated with water, mud wasp nests, etc., so it's worth disassembling to check it out. If the retainer ring bearings and races look reasonably good I'd just clean, regrease and reassemble the original components.



Agreed. I've never needed to replace any bearing retainers. I'll check 'em with a magnifying glass but they've always been fine. I do replace loose bearings whenever I reassemble a hub or BB, but it's probably not necessary.



I'm partial to Phil's just because I've used it since the 1970s. But any marine grease would do. No matter how fast we ride we're not going to stress out any bicycle bearings or exceed the capacity of grease. I just want something that resists water infiltration and lasts a long time.

I get annoyed when I disassemble a bearing component and find it dry or nearly dry, and it appears to have left the factory that way. Grease is cheap. Fill up that cup until it overflows, then wipe the excess. Check it again after a few rides and wipe the excess that extrudes out. It'll be good for years for most of us.
Originally Posted by SurferRosa View Post
Looks like a good deal to me.

You will learn a lot building new wheels. Probably the best investment you can make.
Thanks for all the help! I do have marine trailer wheel bearing grease I'll use for the headset. I know someone previously mentioned taking the bearings in to the bike shop to determine which new ones I'd need if I have to replace any. Is there any reason I could not just measure them with a dial caliper?

The rims say "Weinmann Made in Belgium" on the inside near the tube air stem. The are definitely an alloy and not steel (although steel is technically an alloy). Any reason not to relace these? If one spoke broke does that mean others are likely to do the same?

Also, according to this site, the original seatpost was probably 26.2 since there was a 26mm seatpost installed with a very thin shim of what appears to be some foil material. Any suggestions on a good 26.2mm replacement? Are there differences in the clamp that actually holds the seat to the post (do different seats require different posts)?

Last edited by Cheseldine; 01-09-19 at 10:40 AM.
Cheseldine is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-19, 11:01 AM
  #70  
Aubergine 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Seattle and Reims
Posts: 2,440

Bikes: Too many to list

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 581 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Cheseldine View Post

The rims say "Weinmann Made in Belgium" on the inside near the tube air stem. The are definitely an alloy and not steel (although steel is technically an alloy). Any reason not to relace these? If one spoke broke does that mean others are likely to do the same?
Relacing the existing spokes would be fine. A broken spoke *may* suggest that others could break, but not necessarily. And for what it is worth, it drives me nuts when people refer to aluminum parts as ďalloyĒ parts for the very reason you mention.

Also, according to this site, the original seatpost was probably 26.2 since there was a 26mm seatpost installed with a very thin shim of what appears to be some foil material. Any suggestions on a good 26.2mm replacement? Are there differences in the clamp that actually holds the seat to the post (do different seats require different posts)?
Are you sure of that measurement? Did you not say that the original post jammed when it was inserted much of the way? Take a look at the slot between the seat post clamp. Are the sides of the slot parallel or are they pinched in? If they are parallel, try clamping the seat post (gently! Donít pinch the sides of the slot together) without the shim and see if it is sloppy.

For a replacement, check eBay. French eBay often has parts that donít show up on the US eBay. And as for the seat rail clamps, most clamps are of a standard size. Yours almost surely is standard.
__________________
Keeping Seattleís bike shops in business since 1978
Aubergine is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-19, 12:23 PM
  #71  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 7,910

Bikes: Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel, Centurion Ironman Expert

Mentioned: 128 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2335 Post(s)
Weinmann Belgium made rims are worth keeping just for nostalgia.

A local experienced mechanic and wheel builder told me the likelihood of spokes continuing to break may depend on where the break occurred -- at the hub or at the rim. Problem is, I don't remember the rest! So when my errand bike's cheap single wall rim rear wheel popped a spoke I just replaced the entire wheel with a sturdy double wall rim with thicker aluminum spokes since that bike often hauls up to 50 lbs of stuff (hey, I'm supporting three cats inherited from my mom and it takes a lot of cat litter).

But for a more interesting rim like yours it'd be worth maintaining and replacing spokes, either as needed or all at once.

Reminds me, I kept the damaged Araya single wall rims from my Univega to practice on. That bike was hit by a car last spring, scraping one rim too badly to salvage but the other was just warped. Good enough to practice on since all I've done before is crude truing on the bike. And I want to salvage the original hubs, even though I've already replaced the wheels.
canklecat is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-19, 12:54 PM
  #72  
Cheseldine
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Aubergine View Post


Relacing the existing spokes would be fine. A broken spoke *may* suggest that others could break, but not necessarily. And for what it is worth, it drives me nuts when people refer to aluminum parts as “alloy” parts for the very reason you mention.



Are you sure of that measurement? Did you not say that the original post jammed when it was inserted much of the way? Take a look at the slot between the seat post clamp. Are the sides of the slot parallel or are they pinched in? If they are parallel, try clamping the seat post (gently! Don’t pinch the sides of the slot together) without the shim and see if it is sloppy.

For a replacement, check eBay. French eBay often has parts that don’t show up on the US eBay. And as for the seat rail clamps, most clamps are of a standard size. Yours almost surely is standard.


Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
Weinmann Belgium made rims are worth keeping just for nostalgia.

A local experienced mechanic and wheel builder told me the likelihood of spokes continuing to break may depend on where the break occurred -- at the hub or at the rim. Problem is, I don't remember the rest! So when my errand bike's cheap single wall rim rear wheel popped a spoke I just replaced the entire wheel with a sturdy double wall rim with thicker aluminum spokes since that bike often hauls up to 50 lbs of stuff (hey, I'm supporting three cats inherited from my mom and it takes a lot of cat litter).

But for a more interesting rim like yours it'd be worth maintaining and replacing spokes, either as needed or all at once.

Reminds me, I kept the damaged Araya single wall rims from my Univega to practice on. That bike was hit by a car last spring, scraping one rim too badly to salvage but the other was just warped. Good enough to practice on since all I've done before is crude truing on the bike. And I want to salvage the original hubs, even though I've already replaced the wheels.
I think after speaking you you folks I'll service the existing hubs (labeled Normandy Made in France) and relace them to the existing Weinmann rims. Do you know which spokes I should order? There are 36 of the per wheel. The rims also appear to have perfectly straight walls with no lip. Would a 27" Pasela Panaracer still work on these?

Last edited by Cheseldine; 01-09-19 at 01:14 PM.
Cheseldine is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-19, 11:39 AM
  #73  
Cheseldine
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
I should have the frame completely stripped down by Sunday - I'm planning to go over the paint with a little polish while removing any rust from the rock chip areas before touch up paint. Do you folks recommend spraying the frame (chrome taped of course) with an automotive clear coat to protect it once it is thoroughly degreased to protect it?
Cheseldine is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-19, 02:19 PM
  #74  
SurferRosa
Senior Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 169

Bikes: old school roadies

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 64 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Cheseldine View Post
Do you know which spokes I should order?
Read Sheldon Brown's wheelbuilding page. You will need to measure the hubs and find the ERD for the rims. Use an online spoke calculator. Then order Sapim Race spokes from danscomp.com (or similar spokes). And follow Sheldon's instruction.

Would a 27" Panaracer Paselas work on these?
Yes, if the rims are 27".

Originally Posted by Cheseldine View Post
I'm planning to go over the paint with ... touch up paint. Do you folks recommend spraying the frame ... with an automotive clear coat?
​​​​​​​Just wax.
SurferRosa is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-19, 11:55 PM
  #75  
Cheseldine
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Aubergine View Post


Relacing the existing spokes would be fine. A broken spoke *may* suggest that others could break, but not necessarily. And for what it is worth, it drives me nuts when people refer to aluminum parts as ďalloyĒ parts for the very reason you mention.



Are you sure of that measurement? Did you not say that the original post jammed when it was inserted much of the way? Take a look at the slot between the seat post clamp. Are the sides of the slot parallel or are they pinched in? If they are parallel, try clamping the seat post (gently! Donít pinch the sides of the slot together) without the shim and see if it is sloppy.

For a replacement, check eBay. French eBay often has parts that donít show up on the US eBay. And as for the seat rail clamps, most clamps are of a standard size. Yours almost surely is standard.
I just snapped this pic of the seat post that the 26mm long steel tube was in, but could not lower more than about half way. Anything you guys can gather?


Last edited by Cheseldine; 01-12-19 at 12:00 AM.
Cheseldine is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service