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Vintage components made in the USA?

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Vintage components made in the USA?

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Old 01-10-19, 06:29 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by crank_addict View Post
Perhaps someone could shed more light of Scott Sports and their handlebars- where made, etc.. They also 'grabbed' onto the aero bar patent and sold licensing rights of it, in the mid or late 1980s.
Scott did sell relabeled Modolo brake levers as their own though......
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Old 01-10-19, 06:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Estuche View Post
Heard back from Ritchey, quill stems made by Nitto, they are not sure about 26.0 handlebars but definitely not in the US, interesting historical bits.
That was quick. Thanks for the info!
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Old 01-10-19, 06:34 PM
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did anyone mention Bob Reedy???

Here's an article from way back (not my scan... it comes from Robert Broderick, back when he was active on the CR list)

Steve in Peoria



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Old 01-10-19, 06:36 PM
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Originally Posted by wesmamyke View Post
I've seen early Sun rims labeled as US made, still some floating around as late as 2000ish.
Good call on Sun rims. I had a wicked light 700c wheelset in the tail end 1980's (1990). USA made Sun M?? rims, Nukeproof Ti hubs / rear cassette, and drum roll please.... Fiber Flite carbon fiber spokes (radial laced on the front).

And about Salsa stems, Ross Shafer worked the earlier days (1980ish) Santana tandems. Before the threadless stem became mtb mainstream, he made a beauty fillet brazed for the road tandem stoker.

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Old 01-10-19, 06:55 PM
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These came on a bike I recently acquired. If you go to the thread titled "1982 Trek 412 maybe," someone responded with some info on them.

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Old 01-10-19, 07:09 PM
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Originally Posted by crank_addict View Post
There was the Swiss owned Weinmann that produced rims in Olney, IL. I'm curious if any brake products were produced there as well. Went up in smoke... literally.
Very interesting, I'm curious too

Originally Posted by Chombi1 View Post
Scott did sell relabeled Modolo brake levers as their own though......
This as well, very good to know!

Originally Posted by wesmamyke View Post
I've seen early Sun rims labeled as US made, still some floating around as late as 2000ish.

Proshift/Precision billet made derailleurs, you can buy an updated one from Toronto cycles I think. The White Industries derailleur used it's own crazy grip shifter thing with double cables, so maybe counts for US made shifter.

Came across some Grove Innovations road stems the other day, thought they only did MTB stuff. Very American, SAE/imperial hardware and threads on everything.
Wow those Groove bar stem combos look aero
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Old 01-10-19, 07:19 PM
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I've posted this before.... Pino Moroni titanium/aluminum skewers, made in Detroit. 'Not gorgeous to look at, but easy on the scales.....

Dean


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Old 01-10-19, 07:34 PM
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^Very cool weight weenie skewers^

Spokes-
Wheelsmith has been around for a long time but when did they actually start producing spokes (USA)?
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Old 01-10-19, 08:44 PM
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Originally Posted by wesmamyke View Post
I've seen early Sun rims labeled as US made, .
The M14-A was a great all-around rim. People were not happy when they stopped being offered.
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Old 01-10-19, 11:31 PM
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Originally Posted by RobbieTunes View Post
The M14-A was a great all-around rim. People were not happy when they stopped being offered.
I have 4 brand-new Sun M14A rims in my collection. They're 26" MTB size, 36-hole, so they're an odd combination. They'd be perfect for restoring a late-'80's Trek mountain bike.

Anybody want 'em?
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Old 01-11-19, 06:50 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by Erzulis Boat View Post
Yes. I think the engineer weighed like 90 pounds soaking wet. Everything I had that was Syncros BITD couldn't take the beatdown on my MTB's.
I still have a NOS seatpost in my stash.

They tried to be different, but went in the wrong direction every time. Remember the compressed split cylinder for securing the stem to the steerer? Shockingly bad design.
I bought one of those from a Canadian bike shop a few years ago that is for road. It has that split cylinder design of which you speak. I would think road usage would be slightly more forgiving. Could you comment further on what you see as the weakness of the design?

I like the look of this stem and have been considering using it


These are made in Canada, not USA though. I also have on of the silver “Hammer & Cycle” silver quill stems for 26.0 bars that I may use on my Trek Multitrack road conversion.

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Old 01-11-19, 07:07 AM
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I just remembered Bruce Gordon used to make quite a few quill stems as well. He called them "Chicken Neck Stems". TIG or fillet brazed. There ahould be a few floating around as he offered them for sale separately from his bikes.

http://www.bgcycles.com/new-page-5/

He also has quite a few other components, including cantilever brakes, but those may have been cast overseas.


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Old 01-11-19, 09:04 AM
  #38  
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Surprised this hasn't been posted yet.
Derailleurs from the USA
Some real beauties there.


Early Grip Shift units were made in USA. Chicago specifically. After seeing Jonas Carney shift mid-sprint -and easily drop me and the whole peloton- I really wanted a set, but our team sponsors wouldn't allow it.
I completely changed my mind when I had to install them on a customer's bike. Total PIA.

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Old 01-11-19, 10:25 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by masi61 View Post


I bought one of those from a Canadian bike shop a few years ago that is for road. It has that split cylinder design of which you speak. I would think road usage would be slightly more forgiving. Could you comment further on what you see as the weakness of the design?

I like the look of this stem and have been considering using it


These are made in Canada, not USA though. I also have on of the silver “Hammer & Cycle” silver quill stems for 26.0 bars that I may use on my Trek Multitrack road conversion.
They look cool, but the split cylinder applies force to pull the stem "forward" and then the only real contact to maintain position is the PSI exerted from the now small split cylinder and the virtual sliver of contact from the rear inside contact area of the sleeve that goes around the steerer.
A conventional clamp actually ovalizes the steerer tube when clamped properly (albeit small, but there) and with sufficient torque on the conventional clamp holds the stem in place in both planes.

The Syncros design has the split collar within a sleeve, and there has to be by nature of the design some allocation for movement (to work). What happens is that as you ride the bike, this tiny amount "room" is utilized by the split cylinder, and the stem works itself loose. It happens in the vertical plane typically, and your top cap that was set to merely hold the preload of the headset is now doing a bunch of work. On an MTB at least, even with a well anchored internal star nut (within the steerer tube) starts to get pulled up, and presto, your head set top race is loose. You re-tighten, and a day later, loose again. The top cap should not be subjected to that much work, in fact, a properly installed stem can be ridden without issue if you remove the top cap after setting preload and then securing the stem (not wise, as the top cap can act as a safety valve of sorts, and also help to eliminate any vertical movement "slide". The MTB version actually had a thin plastic top cap that was proprietary because the top of the stem was angled, They were merely adding insult to injury there.

Looks cool and works for placement issues on lab equipment etc. but not so good for a stem. You may not have a issue, but by nature, it's not the best way to anchor a stem.

Part of my day job is designing clamps that go onto cylinders for military applications. We have tried similar setups where space is at a premium, and they do not do the job (high stress applications) unless they are so overkill/redundant as to negate the compactness that we seek.
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Old 01-11-19, 10:40 AM
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Be sure to look for a Durham Elipitical Chainwheel. Rode one once. Felt like the wheels of the bike had been built off center.
photo from Velobase


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Old 01-11-19, 10:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr. Spadoni View Post
Be sure to look for a Durham Elipitical Chainwheel. Rode one once. Felt like the wheels of the bike had been built off center.
photo from Velobase



Wow. The inventor was not a cyclist more than likely. I knew a guy that designed this bike that had a variable seat tube angle to "trick" the body on hills, and give a physiological impression that you were still on the flats. Regrettably, the top tube length basically halved, but that wasn't a concern of his. He was totally convinced this was the answer, but he never rode bikes, not even beach cruisers. He invested a lot of money.

Another guy nearly went broke getting a patent for a seat that would hook your lower back and lock you to the saddle. He was convinced this was the secret to cycling power. He also never rode bikes. He actually accosted one of the Schwinn family members way back when in the plant parking lot with his invention.

Then we have "Z" cranks......................yikes!
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Old 01-11-19, 11:58 AM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by Erzulis Boat View Post
They look cool, but the split cylinder applies force to pull the stem "forward" and then the only real contact to maintain position is the PSI exerted from the now small split cylinder and the virtual sliver of contact from the rear inside contact area of the sleeve that goes around the steerer.
A conventional clamp actually ovalizes the steerer tube when clamped properly (albeit small, but there) and with sufficient torque on the conventional clamp holds the stem in place in both planes.

The Syncros design has the split collar within a sleeve, and there has to be by nature of the design some allocation for movement (to work). What happens is that as you ride the bike, this tiny amount "room" is utilized by the split cylinder, and the stem works itself loose. It happens in the vertical plane typically, and your top cap that was set to merely hold the preload of the headset is now doing a bunch of work. On an MTB at least, even with a well anchored internal star nut (within the steerer tube) starts to get pulled up, and presto, your head set top race is loose. You re-tighten, and a day later, loose again. The top cap should not be subjected to that much work, in fact, a properly installed stem can be ridden without issue if you remove the top cap after setting preload and then securing the stem (not wise, as the top cap can act as a safety valve of sorts, and also help to eliminate any vertical movement "slide". The MTB version actually had a thin plastic top cap that was proprietary because the top of the stem was angled, They were merely adding insult to injury there.

Looks cool and works for placement issues on lab equipment etc. but not so good for a stem. You may not have a issue, but by nature, it's not the best way to anchor a stem.

Part of my day job is designing clamps that go onto cylinders for military applications. We have tried similar setups where space is at a premium, and they do not do the job (high stress applications) unless they are so overkill/redundant as to negate the compactness that we seek.
Thanks for the detailed response! If you look at my photo you will see that this also has the sloping top which would require me to use their angled top cap that you mentioned.

At at least I have the steel steerer on my carbon fork. The included star nut should hold stronger than an expansion plug type that is used in carbon steerers.



In the first photo you can see that my Control Tech seatpost still has the “Made in USA” sticker on it. I really like that design for a seatpost - it is very strong with the interior bore having a central strengthening rib.

Also in this side view of the Syncros stem you get a better look at the angled top of the stem. I’m hesitant to take a hack saw to the Ritchey 1” threadless fork’s steer tube just yet until I work out the spacer arrangement.

Last edited by masi61; 01-11-19 at 12:03 PM.
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Old 01-11-19, 12:07 PM
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Originally Posted by masi61 View Post


Thanks for the detailed response! If you look at my photo you will see that this also has the sloping top which would require me to use their angled top cap that you mentioned.

At at least I have the steel steerer on my carbon fork. The included star nut should hold stronger than an expansion plug type that is used in carbon steerers.



In the first photo you can see that my Control Tech seatpost still has the “Made in USA” sticker on it. I really like that design for a seatpost - it is very strong with the interior bore having a central strengthening rib.

Also in this side view of the Syncros stem you get a better look at the angled top of the stem. I’m hesitant to take a hack saw to the Ritchey 1” threadless fork’s steer tube just yet until I work out the spacer arrangement.
That sounds like the ideal setup for that design and it's limitations. I was doing XC with mine, and it was also 130mm long. Plus, it's a road application with you. Looks cool as can be though!

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Old 01-11-19, 12:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Dean51 View Post
I've posted this before.... Pino Moroni titanium/aluminum skewers, made in Detroit. 'Not gorgeous to look at, but easy on the scales.....

Dean


IMG_2453
I remember those. Perfectly fine with vertical dropouts, but with horizontals, it was game over....you could never get them tight enough to do the job.

With the aluminum contact and the titanium skewers, it would pull in the dropouts and stop you dead cold if you gave the bike a ton of gas, especially at a stoplight start. In fact, in the MTB world, titanium skewers would not do the job on suspension fronts, and that is why you started seeing all the CT brand etc. have a cro-mo front skewer, while maintaining a titanium rear (with vertical dropouts naturally).

Vertical dropouts alone accounted for weight savings in multiple component arenas, an unintended result perhaps.
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Old 01-11-19, 01:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Rocket-Sauce View Post
Surprised this hasn't been posted yet.
Derailleurs from the USA
Some real beauties there.


Early Grip Shift units were made in USA. Chicago specifically. After seeing Jonas Carney shift mid-sprint -and easily drop me and the whole peloton- I really wanted a set, but our team sponsors wouldn't allow it.
I completely changed my mind when I had to install them on a customer's bike. Total PIA.
Wow all of this is pure gold!

So many great contributions from everyone

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Old 01-11-19, 01:23 PM
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This is not what you want, don't get your hopes up, you can safely skip this post, but...

AFAIK, there are a couple of companies in the USA building road bikes from the ground up: RBR, Victory.
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Old 01-11-19, 03:17 PM
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Originally Posted by TenGrainBread View Post
I just remembered Bruce Gordon used to make quite a few quill stems as well. He called them "Chicken Neck Stems". TIG or fillet brazed. There ahould be a few floating around as he offered them for sale separately from his bikes.

Chicken Neck Stems ? Nothing is better than a bike that fits

He also has quite a few other components, including cantilever brakes, but those may have been cast overseas.

I have the good fortune of owning a pair of Bruce's hand-made titanium brake straddle cable carriers; very limited production.



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Old 01-11-19, 03:36 PM
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I remember SWEET Parts from the early-to-mid 90's, they made expensive, ultralight, welded-steel stems and cranksets.
This seemed like an interesting alternative to all of the failure-prone CNC stuff available at the time.

One of the principles of the company regularly rode the Tues/Thurs Griffith Park ride in L.A. back then, so the parts survived reasonable testing (though as always, "light parts for light riders" applied).
There were freeplay issues with the Hirth-type joining of the two halves of the spindle, and there were other failures, but their idea of moving the stem's quill bolt head down into the quill to save weight was copied by others.
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Old 01-11-19, 03:41 PM
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
I remember SWEET Parts from the early-to-mid 90's, they made expensive, ultralight, welded-steel stems and cranksets.
This seemed like an interesting alternative to all of the failure-prone CNC stuff available at the time.

One of the principles of the company regularly rode the Tues/Thurs Griffith Park ride in L.A. back then, so the parts survived reasonable testing (though as always, "light parts for light riders" applied).
There were freeplay issues with the Hirth-type joining of the two halves of the spindle, and there were other failures, but their idea of moving the stem's quill bolt head down into the quill to save weight was copied by others.
Can't believe I forgot about them! The sunken fixing bolt was super cool, in fact Kona had a copy on the 1990's Kapu steel framed bike. Slight derail, but the Kona Kapu was a great riding steel bike for a reasonable price, it came spec'd with Veloce. Anyway, back on topic.
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Old 01-11-19, 04:27 PM
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It is super subjective, but to this day I find the road version of the sweet wings cranks one of the slickest ever made.

Never seen one of their stems installed in a bike though.

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