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Mystery Tools

Old 01-10-19, 11:26 PM
  #1  
lasauge 
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Mystery Tools

I recently purchased some tools, and among them there are four things that I'm curious about. With this forum's wealth of knowledge I'm sure someone here can explain what they are for:
From left to right:
1. I think I have seen this object mentioned around here before as something made by Bicycle Research in the past?
2. Eldi -branded crimping/cutting tool? the removable heads are both concave.
3. This is a Park BCE-2 (Brake Clamp Expander), I understand what it does, but I can't imagine needing such a tool. Can anyone here vouch for it being a useful thing in the past?
4. A Park KS-1 for removing/installing spring-loaded kickstands. Likewise, I understand what it does, but am curious if anyone will remember this meeting a real need in the past?
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Old 01-11-19, 12:11 AM
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I think the one on the bottom is used to bend bent rims back inline, and not sure about the others.
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Old 01-11-19, 05:51 AM
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We used to use the brake clamp expanders now and then. Handy on american made department store bikes in the 80s...... yes it was a miserable job.
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Old 01-11-19, 06:33 AM
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The Eldi tool is No. 297 and is used for cutting spoke ends that protrude beyond the nipple on built wheels.
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Old 01-11-19, 07:25 AM
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The two blue-handled Park tools are a brake lever clamp expander (very handy, I used one on nearly every assembly back when you really had to put the things together) and a kickstand remover for integrated Schwinn kickstands that greatly simplifies the removal and reinstall. Not much need unless you were moving stuff (like a kickstand) from an old frame to a new one, and then this tool was a blessing.

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Old 01-11-19, 08:49 AM
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PM me if you're interested in selling the Park kickstand tool.
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Old 01-11-19, 09:14 AM
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I remember using the Eldi spoke end nipper BITD. I also remember the Park expander tool being in the tool rack, but I rarely used it.

The first tool appears somewhat akin to the Bicycle Research portable freewheel tool. Those were meant to toss in your panniers so a freewheel could be removed on the road. A stick or something was supposed to be scrounged to use as a lever. Obviously this tool won't work for that. It looks like the smaller 'horns' are meant to engage a cog. I don't know what it is, but my best guess is that it's meant to remove fixed gear cogs.
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Old 01-11-19, 09:32 AM
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I worked in a shop from ‘91-‘96, and I can confidently say that none of these were ever used in that period of time.
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Old 01-11-19, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Velocivixen View Post
I think the one on the bottom is used to bend bent rims back inline, and not sure about the others.
But I do think we may have had a wider Park tool version of this for bending rims, if that is indeed what this is for. We used to work magic on bent rims.
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Old 01-11-19, 10:06 AM
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Originally Posted by HarborBandS View Post


But I do think we may have had a wider Park tool version of this for bending rims, if that is indeed what this is for. We used to work magic on bent rims.
Bicycle research made the rim bending pliers if I recall.

Also the thing with the round pins looks like it might work on a tandem drum/drag brake. Maybe two pins are the tool surface, and the other are to stick a lever in there to turn it?
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Old 01-11-19, 12:23 PM
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
The Eldi tool is No. 297 and is used for cutting spoke ends that protrude beyond the nipple on built wheels.
Yes, very similar to the VAR no.17, but with an offset handle:

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Old 01-11-19, 12:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Salamandrine View Post
I remember using the Eldi spoke end nipper BITD. I also remember the Park expander tool being in the tool rack, but I rarely used it.

The first tool appears somewhat akin to the Bicycle Research portable freewheel tool. Those were meant to toss in your panniers so a freewheel could be removed on the road. A stick or something was supposed to be scrounged to use as a lever. Obviously this tool won't work for that. It looks like the smaller 'horns' are meant to engage a cog. I don't know what it is, but my best guess is that it's meant to remove fixed gear cogs.
I believe I’ve seen those use with a freewheel and a road sign? Holes should match up pretty well, nice and solid in ground lever.
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Old 01-11-19, 01:10 PM
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Originally Posted by wesmamyke View Post
Bicycle research made the rim bending pliers if I recall.

Also the thing with the round pins looks like it might work on a tandem drum/drag brake. Maybe two pins are the tool surface, and the other are to stick a lever in there to turn it?
I was going through some photos of old tools online, and realized the Park tool I was thinking of was a "tire seater" PTS-1. And I never used that, since I was a strong young guy with hands that could seat any tire.

But yes, we had a fully metal tool of some type to straighten rims. It was definitely the same as the Bicycle Research tool pictured below, or very similar:

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Old 01-11-19, 03:34 PM
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In the current era when hand-built wheels are a rarity reserved mainly for top-end wheelsets spoke nippers have, no doubt, fallen from favor; but in a time before cheap machine-built wheels we replaced rims for all sorts and sizes of wheels. A bike shop had to keep many different sizes of spokes in stock for everything from 16" wheels to 27" wheels. Inevitably there were gaps in the stock and one had to use a larger spoke than optimum. The nippers (if they were sharp) made quick work of the protruding bits of spoke. If they weren't sharp they were pure torture, at least for my skinny hands. Nowadays I use a small electric angle grinder but I never knew of such a tool in 1973.
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