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New folder: Cinzia Elite 1972

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New folder: Cinzia Elite 1972

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Old 02-27-19, 04:46 PM
  #26  
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The brakes are long reach steel. Model Super Rapidix made by Bianchi Milano. I might be cleaning them up and trying out before I consider replacing them.
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Old 03-01-19, 08:40 AM
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It's really looking good Law ! Use the Miller light set up if you want to stay old school. What'd you use to tackle rust? I've read on BF about how good Evaporust is, but when I went to Auto Zone (I had a gift card that needed using) they no longer carried it and now carry a Rust-oleum product. Hopefully it will do as well for me on the '73 10 speed Grand Prix and the rusty Fuji SRR. I also found some metallic red paint I think will be a good match on the Grand Prix.


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Old 03-01-19, 02:59 PM
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I’m using OX for the small stuff but physically removing the heavy rust for everything else. Then I treat it with rust converter. Italian chrome is not so good!
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Old 03-02-19, 07:52 PM
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No pics but gonna keep the build current.
- remounted brakes with new pads
- removed Campy GS crank and Shimano BB
- cleaned original but good shape BB
- cleaned the cotter pins up with a file for reuse
- finally found the lock spacer for the headset
- measured the old housing for replacement

not big or exciting but all necessary for this project to move forward.
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Old 03-03-19, 02:47 PM
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Now that I have decided to use the original cotter crank, I am back to the old pedals as well. Only marking on them is MB. Stands for Milano Bianchi?

Small job job but took a lot of time for just one pedal. Reflectors are missing on the one I started with and the other one is half way there. If I ride the bike more and donít upgrade the crank, I will put some red reflective tape behind its metal frame.

turned out decent and continues the classic look of my Italian folder. Refurbed one spins quite nice with new lube.
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Old 03-03-19, 03:30 PM
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Your folder is looking good! About four or five years ago our market seemed almost flooded with Raleigh 20's, usually priced between $120 and $220. Have not seen any lately though. I was not tempted as I have a modern Giant folder which is used a lot. I'm sure you will enjoy riding a folder. It's a fun new twist on cycling.
Shown my 2012 "HalfWay" on vacation in Myrtle Beach area. It has likely been ridden more than 2000 miles already.
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Old 03-03-19, 06:21 PM
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Thanks! I think I will enjoy pooting around on this folder. I have been delving into this small wheeled world since picking it up. Eventually I hope to add a Raleigh Twenty to the permanent stable here. Got to have a Raleigh...

I have seen those halfways in internet searches. Are those 451 wheeled?
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Old 03-03-19, 06:50 PM
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Came with 20" x1 1/4 Kendas which were prone to flatting on a trip to south Texas in 2015. I replaced them with 20" x1 1/2" Schwalbe Marathons which have only flatted once in Florida in 2017. I put them on my wife's Giant Expressway as well. Not as quick feeling but pretty rugged and I'm a big guy. Its been lots of fun and more of a road bike geometry, but I think Sandi's Expressway is a better buy. Our LBS kind of got caught out with them and sold me the pair for just over $1000. The HW listed at $899 CDN at the time..
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Old 03-04-19, 05:10 PM
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It has the ribbed style just like the old one.
New cable for the folder. Old stuff from Spain which requires an inner sleeve to be used. My source has multiple colours but no white. I choose blue to match the paint.
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Old 03-04-19, 05:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Pompiere View Post
Those U frame folders were popular in the 1970s, maybe so you could put it in your trunk to break up your commute and store it at your workplace. They are not very practical to carry when folded. A few different companies made them, or at least put their names on them. I read somewhere that the Italian made frames had the integrated rack, while the others have a separate bolt-on rack. I have one made by Rog in Czechoslovakia. It has a bolt-on, mouse trap rack. The other features are similar, including the hinge.
-----

As I recall the Rog brand it was produced in the former Yugoslavia, in the then province of Slovenia.

I think the factory survived the breakup but do not know it if remains viable today.

Our @T-Mar has written of it in the past. Perhaps he will contribute...

-----
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Old 03-04-19, 05:34 PM
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Originally Posted by 3speedslow View Post


Now that I have decided to use the original cotter crank, I am back to the old pedals as well. Only marking on them is MB. Stands for Milano Bianchi?

Small job job but took a lot of time for just one pedal. Reflectors are missing on the one I started with and the other one is half way there. If I ride the bike more and don’t upgrade the crank, I will put some red reflective tape behind its metal frame.

turned out decent and continues the classic look of my Italian folder. Refurbed one spins quite nice with new lube.
-----

Puzzled by the MB marking on the pedal dustcaps. Assume it to be cycle manufacturer. Much as with the brake calipers. The brand of them is Super Rapid so suspect the Bianchi name refers to a manufacturer of the cycle or distributor.

Pedals have three possible makers: Agrati, Sheffield & Way-Assauto.

All produced models of this pattern with the white rubbers and amber reflectors.

Will have to check my materials to see who is the specific maker here...

Do the bottom bracket fittings bear the Gnutti mark?

The forum's experts have written that they suspect there may have been only two or three manufacturers of these Italian folders so that nearly all of the ones produced represent contract builds, regardless of how badged.

-----

Last edited by juvela; 03-04-19 at 05:35 PM. Reason: spellin'
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Old 03-04-19, 06:16 PM
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Thanks for the info. I tied the MB initials to Milano Bianchi as it was written on the red disk around the brake bolt, my guess at least.

i really was hoping there would be some marks on the spindle but none as well as on the cups. No clue there. There is a name stamped on the front fender but very faint. I intend to make an effort later to find out what name.
@juvela if any clarification comes to you about this folder I appreciate you sharing it!
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Old 03-04-19, 06:19 PM
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I know that the crankset is Gnutti.
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Old 03-04-19, 06:34 PM
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Originally Posted by juvela View Post
-----

As I recall the Rog brand it was produced in the former Yugoslavia, in the then province of Slovenia.

I think the factory survived the breakup but do not know it if remains viable today.

Our @T-Mar has written of it in the past. Perhaps he will contribute...

-----
I think you are right about it being Yugoslavia. I was going off a fuzzy memory from looking it up several years ago. I do remember finding a blog by a young man who lived in the city where Rog was located. He wrote about the old bicycle factory and had pictures of the empty building.
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Old 03-04-19, 06:48 PM
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It has certainly been interesting searching out bits about these European folders. I know Cinzia is still a bicycle company these days.

the basic U frame of these all look similar but have their differences. It’s also nice to see a few blogs about the folders.
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Old 03-05-19, 09:32 AM
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Fortunately, the Cinzia was a historically significant folding bicycle and the company's history is well documented. Hopefully, I've kept the facts and context of this abridged version relatively intact during translation:

Cicli Cinzia was formed in 1967 by Primo Bombi and Servino Maccaferri, specifically to manufacture folding bicycles. Bombi was born in 1901, and by his early teens was working as a assistant to a bicycle painter. He soon left to become to become head painter for the fledgling Maserati automobile company. In 1937, Maserati was sold to the Orsi family who decided to move manufacturing from Bologna to Modena. However, Bombi chose to stay in Bologna and starts his own paint shop, Emilian.

Bombi takes on futre partner Servino Maccaferri as an apprentice at Emilian and the company flourishes, providing painting services to local bicycle and motorcycle manufacturers, particularly the Germain marque DWK, which has an assembly operation in Bolgna. However, as the company's reputation grows, work comes in from other manufacturers in the region, such a Ducati, Minarelli and Morini. It is a family operation, with Primo's two daughters, Diva and Rossana performing the pin striping on the tanks and fenders painted by their father and Servino. Diva and Servino marry, resulting in Emilian becoming a partnership between Bombi and Maccaferri.

The company continues to grow in the post war era and in the mid-1960s they take an interest in improving the popular Graziella folding bicycle. They realize that increasing the tyre size from 16" to 20" will increase pedalling efficiency without a marked increase in weight or portability. After some development, the new bicycle debuts in 1966.

Bombi and Maccaferri thought it best to capital on a female name and the initial choice was Annabella, but it violated the trademark owned by an Italian fashion magazine and the new company could not afford the license fees. Next door was a wheelchair factory and one day they heard the caretaker call out to his daughter "Cinzia!". The proverbial bulb simultaneously lit in both heads and a new marque was born.

The initial batch quickly sold out due the 20" wheels, metallic blue paint and a lower price point than the Graziella. Demand outstrips supply, and local retailers start showing up at the factory after their shops closed , to take delivery of unassembled bicycles that they would assemble overnight, so as to have them available in their shops the next morning. The superb finish continues to be a prime selling point and the colour palette is expanded in include green moss, lake green and metallic orange.

Cicli Cinzia is formally established on January 25, 1967, occupying a new, larger building, that produces 400 bicycles per day. Further expansion takes place in 1970, with a new 15,000 square metre factory with a capacity of 120,00 bicycles per year. By this time Primo has stepped down, with his son Guiseppe taking over sales and marketing, while Servino's son, Sergio, has joined him to supervise production.

In the 1970, the company expands its product line to include new folders, juvenile bicycle, hi-risers and competition bicycles, even sponsoring a pro team. The company hits a rough spot in 1973 when an American bank cancels its contract for 10,000 ready to be shipped bicycles, intended to be given away to customers who open new accounts. Fortunately, the oil crisis leads to Italy invoking a law prohibiting motor vehicle use on holidays. This leads to a new trend of Sunday family cycling, and the 10,000 bicycle inventory is sold in a few weeks.

More success follows in the 1980s as the company continues to grow, with production reaching 200,000 units annually. ATBs are introduced and the company takes on the contract manufacturing of brands, notably Peugeot and France, and Legnano in Italy. Productionw ould peak in 1993, with a record 360,000 bicycles.

To-day, the company still survives, as a family run business. As of the 50th anniversary in 2017, Cinzia folding bicycles sales had exceeded 3 million units.


Last edited by T-Mar; 03-05-19 at 09:37 AM. Reason: added pictures
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Old 03-05-19, 10:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Pompiere View Post
Those U frame folders were popular in the 1970s, maybe so you could put it in your trunk to break up your commute and store it at your workplace. They are not very practical to carry when folded. A few different companies made them, or at least put their names on them. I read somewhere that the Italian made frames had the integrated rack, while the others have a separate bolt-on rack. I have one made by Rog in Czechoslovakia. It has a bolt-on, mouse trap rack. The other features are similar, including the hinge.

As noted by juvela, Rog was a Yugoslavian company. There were lots of Rog Pony folding bicycles in Canada during the 1970s. My recollection is that there were multiple models, some with integrated racks and some without. Integrated racks were not unique to Italian folders. The LBS that I worked at in the early 1970s carried folding models from Peugeot and Gitane, with folding racks.
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Old 03-05-19, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by juvela View Post
-----

Puzzled by the MB marking on the pedal dustcaps. Assume it to be cycle manufacturer. Much as with the brake calipers. The brand of them is Super Rapid so suspect the Bianchi name refers to a manufacturer of the cycle or distributor...
I believe the MB may stand for Moto Benelli, the famous motorcycle manufacturer. They also produced mopeds, so would have had pedals manufactured for them. The fore-aft dimension isn't very large, which is more typical of moped pedals.
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Old 03-05-19, 11:23 AM
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Thank You T-Mar for that well needed bit of Cinzia history! I had gleaned bits of it from searches but never put together like that. Neat to read how a simple moment can lead to a name used by a well known marque. Knowing that my little folder has millions of Italian cousins across the way is fantastic,

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Old 03-05-19, 04:37 PM
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-----

HUGE grazie per nostro @T-Mar!

---

regarding the Bianchi marking on the brake caliper -

forum member CrowSeph took in a unknown condorino type machine whose Super Rapid brake calipers also had the Bianchi name on their washers. Another marking on his machine's calipers was jollis. Keep in mind there are at least two other Bianchi names in the realm of Italian bicycles besides Edoardo. Given T-Mar's great information, perhaps his frame was a Cinzia...

Help me to find out this bike's frame

---

tip for marking on fender -

if after you get rid of all dirt & corrosion the marking remains unreadable you can lay in some ink or thinned paint and wipe it off. this will make the low areas to show better. perhaps a bright light and/or magnifying glass may assist...

---

have done some checking on the pedals and have been able to eliminate Way-Assauto. addition exploration needed...

-----

Last edited by juvela; 03-05-19 at 05:26 PM. Reason: addition
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Old 03-06-19, 11:40 AM
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I had a loop frame folder made by Norco and it was a real dog's breakfast in terms of quality and ride. I hope yours is much nicer.
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Old 03-06-19, 01:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Narhay View Post
I had a loop frame folder made by Norco and it was a real dog's breakfast in terms of quality and ride. I hope yours is much nicer.
The U frame on folders was a popular style. Many companies used it. I am not too familiar with Norco but since this Company, Cinzia, has been around and producing these successfully for over 50 years, I think it stands a good chance of being enjoyable to ride.
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Old 03-06-19, 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by 3speedslow View Post
The U frame on folders was a popular style. Many companies used it. I am not too familiar with Norco but since this Company, Cinzia, has been around and producing these successfully for over 50 years, I think it stands a good chance of being enjoyable to ride.
Or a chick magnet, based on the ads....
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Old 03-06-19, 05:09 PM
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....my wife had another take on that pic,” so you have a chic bike?”
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Old 03-06-19, 06:06 PM
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Waiting on good weather for a spray session. Waiting...
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