Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

How important is vintage bike weight?

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

How important is vintage bike weight?

Old 02-24-19, 06:09 AM
  #1  
kross57
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: north NJ
Posts: 286

Bikes: Miyata 710, Team Fuji, Schwinn World Sport

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
How important is vintage bike weight?

I know some bikes get a bad rap because they are heavier than others. But lets say my vintage bike weighs 25 pounds. When I park my butt in the saddle, it suddenly weighs 170. So, going down the road, what matters more? The 1 ounce I saved using drilled brake levers? Or the 12-ounce beer I skipped at lunch? In the final equation, how important is the bike weight, really? For high-end competitors who have leaned themselves out to the max, maybe. But for most of us?
kross57 is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 06:57 AM
  #2  
rccardr 
aka: Dr. Cannondale
 
rccardr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,307

Bikes: I'd rather not count how many, thank you

Mentioned: 146 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1008 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 11 Posts
...not such a big deal. Most decent vintage builds weigh around 21-22 pounds, or maybe 5 pounds more than a $2000-ish new carbon bike. I don't think most riders in most circumstances would notice a 5 pound difference.

On the other hand, last year I lost 30 pounds. Gained some back, but even so I'm much faster than I was when heavier. Easier to climb, too!
__________________
Hard at work in the Secret Underground Laboratory...
rccardr is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 06:59 AM
  #3  
PilotFishBob 
My brain hurts!
 
PilotFishBob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 807

Bikes: A ridiculous number

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 274 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 19 Times in 16 Posts
How a bike feels is more important to me, I've ridden some light bikes that feel a bit dead or just don't suit otherwise. My Super Course is heavier than most of my other bikes but it has a great fit and a lively feel and the extra lbs don't make a substantial difference on the uphills. Adjusting the weight of the butt in the saddle (downwards) is my primary concern - story of my life...
PilotFishBob is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 07:18 AM
  #4  
FBOATSB 
Senior Member
 
FBOATSB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Central Indiana
Posts: 1,547

Bikes: Old Schwinns

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 561 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
My only requirement is that I can still pick it up and put it in the Park stand. Other than that, I can go as far and as fast as my body will allow regardless of a few pounds one way or another.
FBOATSB is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 07:20 AM
  #5  
Bianchigirll 
Bianchi Goddess
 
Bianchigirll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Fort Wayne, In
Posts: 25,633

Bikes: Too many to list here check my signature.

Mentioned: 94 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1265 Post(s)
Liked 38 Times in 29 Posts
I've been kind of making the same argument for years. People get too wrapped up in getting folding bead tires, latex rims and carbon fiber bottle cages when most of us would be better off skipping that second morning cup of Philbert nut hot chocolate or Nutella/Eggo breakfast sandwich


__________________
Bianchis '87 Sport SX, '90 Proto, '90 Campione del Fausto Giamondi Specialisma Italiano Mundo, '91 Boarala 'cross, '93 Project 3, '86 Volpe, '97 Ti Megatube, , '90 something Vento 603,

Others but still loved,; '80 RIGI, '80 Batavus Professional, '87 Cornelo, '09 Motobecane SOLD, '?? Jane Doe (still on the drawing board), '90ish Haro Escape

Last edited by Bianchigirll; 02-24-19 at 08:54 AM.
Bianchigirll is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 07:27 AM
  #6  
Wildwood 
Veteran/Pacifist/Resister
 
Wildwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Seattle area
Posts: 8,526

Bikes: Bikes??? Thought this was social media?!?

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1749 Post(s)
Liked 92 Times in 67 Posts
I would offer that lighter wheels are more important for my enjoyment than overall weight (up to a point). That's why a dozen wheelsets are tubular.
__________________
70sFollis 072/71 Bottecchia Giro d Italia/72 Zeus Competition/78 Batavus Competition/80 Mondia Super/81 AustroDaimler Olympian/82 Harding(Holdsworth) Special/84 Pinarello Record/85 EM Corsa Extra/86 DeRosa Pro/88 Falcon Race/99 Pinarello Cadore/99 Calfee TetraPro/03 Macalu Cirrus/04 Tallerico: The less ridden = '97 CoMotion tandem + city bike, mtn bike, beach cruiser

Last edited by Wildwood; 02-24-19 at 07:31 AM.
Wildwood is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 07:40 AM
  #7  
since6 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Lacey, WA
Posts: 1,390

Bikes: Stevenson Custom, Stevenson Custom Tandem, Nishiki Professional

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 285 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 29 Times in 16 Posts
How does the bike fit, what is the quality of the ride and wheel weight/tire size has mattered more to me than weight of the bike. Lightening of parts seems more akin to Colin Chapman's quest for the perfect Formula 1 car, designed to be so light that as it crossed the finish line to win the race it would then break/fall apart. A friend's dad won a ration coupon to purchase a bike at the start of WWII. This bike he used as his car, taking trips on this 40lb.+ bike with heavy camping gear, had amazing times/adventures.
since6 is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 07:51 AM
  #8  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 19,407

Bikes: 1959 & 1960 Capo; 1982 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 698 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 20 Posts
For me, anything above about 14kg or 30lb is unacceptable, but below that point I don't make a big deal about overall bicycle weight. As mentioned above, tire and rim weight are important to the acceleration and overall feel and ride quality, which is why I avoid steel rims, which also exhibit unsafely degraded braking performance when wet.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324
Capo: 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 07:56 AM
  #9  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 15,136

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 107 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3613 Post(s)
Liked 67 Times in 59 Posts
I've never paid any attention to weight. I figure if the bike is built right, it's the weight it needs to be. I do pay attention to getting a high quality frame and parts which keeps the weight in check. The lightest bike is not always the most comfortable for riding all day in any case.
bikemig is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 07:59 AM
  #10  
Bianchigirll 
Bianchi Goddess
 
Bianchigirll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Fort Wayne, In
Posts: 25,633

Bikes: Too many to list here check my signature.

Mentioned: 94 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1265 Post(s)
Liked 38 Times in 29 Posts
OH BTW are we talking 'off the shelf' weights or ready to ride with one or two bottles, pump (CO2), seat pack, Garmin or smart phone, bell and flask?
__________________
Bianchis '87 Sport SX, '90 Proto, '90 Campione del Fausto Giamondi Specialisma Italiano Mundo, '91 Boarala 'cross, '93 Project 3, '86 Volpe, '97 Ti Megatube, , '90 something Vento 603,

Others but still loved,; '80 RIGI, '80 Batavus Professional, '87 Cornelo, '09 Motobecane SOLD, '?? Jane Doe (still on the drawing board), '90ish Haro Escape
Bianchigirll is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 08:11 AM
  #11  
nomadmax 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 681
Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 303 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 47 Posts
Originally Posted by Wildwood View Post
I would offer that lighter wheels are more important for my enjoyment than overall weight (up to a point). That's why a dozen wheelsets are tubular.
THAT ^ right there.

Wheel weight is more important than overall weight. Adding to that, the lighter the tires, tubes and rims are the quicker they will accelerate. The further from the center the weight is, the greater the impact on acceleration and climbing. A full 26 oz water bottle is 1.625 pounds + the weight of the bottle; ride a climb with it and then without it; not much of a difference. Now switch wheels that are 1.625 pounds lighter where the bulk of the reduction is at the point furthest from the axles and ride the climb again; big difference. So much so that in some cases you may be able to climb in a slightly higher gear.
nomadmax is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 08:20 AM
  #12  
jamesdak
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Utah
Posts: 5,400

Bikes: G.L. Maillot Juane & Ventoux,Schwinn Circuit, Prologue,PDG Paramount,Paramount,Tempo,Jake The Snake,LeMond Zurich & Tourmelet,Giordana XL Super & Antares,Puegeot U08,Bob Jackson,Fuji S12-S,Opus III,Orbea Cabestany,Bianchi Campione,Basso Gap

Mentioned: 85 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1168 Post(s)
Liked 91 Times in 50 Posts
Well from my ride logs I will say weight doesn't really matter that much. One of my heavier bikes with heavier wheels is still one of my best climbers. I attribute that to how stiff the frame is.

All that said though, I do prefer a bike to feel light under me. I've had some bikes that just didn't feel good, those get passed on. I do like light wheels for how they make the bike feel and a lot of times I'll throw a modern set on my vintage bike just for the enjoyment it gives me.

I do track all the weights of my bikes as part of the fun of collecting. It's just another point of comparison for me. I weigh them all the same, with the pedals and bottle cages on.

Right now the bikes range from 18 lbs 5 ozs to 23 lbs 3 ozs. Not counting the old Peugeot U-08 and AMF 3 speed. Those are "real steal" bikes, lol!
jamesdak is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 08:35 AM
  #13  
easyupbug 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,146

Bikes: too many sparkly Italians, some sweet Americans and a couple interesting Japanese

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 150 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
I am no weight weenie but over the years I have a few data points which have been tested many many times and leave no doubt in my mind. I have 3 bikes that stand out from the herd weight wise, both frame and build. The Vitus 979 and a built for me Tange Prestige Super Lite are only a couple pounds lighter than my other bikes and are faster on my typical routes. I do think I notice what feels like faster acceleration but don't notice when climbing. I have rotated wheelsets around and not found rotational weight to matter for my riding. Also have three Tommasinis, a Tecno, Diamonte, and an older Prestige. The Prestige frame/build is 2+ pounds heavier than the Diamonte and a little more than than that compared to the Tecno. I love all three but the Tecno and Diamonte do have reduced times and feel like they accelerate faster. I keep bikes for the kids families and when they visit I will grab the 979, Super Lite or Tecno to do my best to keep up.
easyupbug is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 08:43 AM
  #14  
scozim 
Ellensburg, WA
 
scozim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Ellensburg, WA
Posts: 3,394

Bikes: See my signature

Mentioned: 56 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 186 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by rccardr View Post
...not such a big deal. Most decent vintage builds weigh around 21-22 pounds, or maybe 5 pounds more than a $2000-ish new carbon bike. I don't think most riders in most circumstances would notice a 5 pound difference.

On the other hand, last year I lost 30 pounds. Gained some back, but even so I'm much faster than I was when heavier. Easier to climb, too!
Years ago there was a former racer telling me during a group ride there was a new bike he wanted to get because it was 3 lbs lighter than his current bike but it was $3500. My initial reaction was "why not just lose the 3 lbs". I don't notice the difference on most of my bikes that are within 3-5 lbs of each other. The definite heavier ones I do but that's because when I grab them I'm out for a more leisurely ride and not pushing myself as hard.

Rccardr climbed really well last summer on his Cannondale.
__________________
1984 Gitane Sprint; 1984 Gitane Tour de France; 1982 Trek 610; 1968 Peugeot PL8; 1982 Nishiki Marina 12; 1972 Peugeot PX-10; 1987 Trek 800 Antelope (touring/commuting set up); 1993 Trek 950 mtb; 1997 Klein Pulse Comp mtb; 1989 Peugeot Limestone hybrid (for touring); 1975 Gitane Olympic; 1983 Vitus 979; 1989 Spectrum Titanium:
scozim is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 08:59 AM
  #15  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 22,485
Mentioned: 166 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8515 Post(s)
Liked 72 Times in 64 Posts
You should compare your vintage rides to a Huffy or a Murray, or a Schwinn Varsity.
CliffordK is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 09:01 AM
  #16  
Bianchigirll 
Bianchi Goddess
 
Bianchigirll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Fort Wayne, In
Posts: 25,633

Bikes: Too many to list here check my signature.

Mentioned: 94 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1265 Post(s)
Liked 38 Times in 29 Posts
Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
You should compare your vintage rides to a Huffy or a Murray, or a Schwinn Varsity.

__________________
Bianchis '87 Sport SX, '90 Proto, '90 Campione del Fausto Giamondi Specialisma Italiano Mundo, '91 Boarala 'cross, '93 Project 3, '86 Volpe, '97 Ti Megatube, , '90 something Vento 603,

Others but still loved,; '80 RIGI, '80 Batavus Professional, '87 Cornelo, '09 Motobecane SOLD, '?? Jane Doe (still on the drawing board), '90ish Haro Escape
Bianchigirll is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 09:11 AM
  #17  
3speedslow
Senior Member
 
3speedslow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Jacksonville, NC
Posts: 7,271

Bikes: A few

Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1240 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 25 Times in 22 Posts
A weighty bike helps me balance while in motion. Too lite and I have difficulty. The lowest I can feel comfortable on is around 21-22 lbs. But then, me and the bike together doesn’t break 150 lbs total so the whole weight issue is mute to me.

3speedslow is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 09:37 AM
  #18  
Wildwood 
Veteran/Pacifist/Resister
 
Wildwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Seattle area
Posts: 8,526

Bikes: Bikes??? Thought this was social media?!?

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1749 Post(s)
Liked 92 Times in 67 Posts
Bought a 70s Bottecchia, SP tubing. flat tires meant no test ride.
Next day rode with new tubes - meh, not impressed with bike's responsiveness.
Rode it with tubular wheels some days later and it handled and accelerated much better.
Approx 600g difference between the two 700c wheelsets.
A conversion on the Follis from 27" wheels to tubulars was even more dramatic in handling.


The true answer for effect of bike weight / wheel weight differences really depends on HOW you ride your bikes.
If you a 15mph rider, mostly on flat/straight roads and trails = virtually no difference.
If you ride for speed/race, have big hills or mountains, curvy potholed/earthquaked roads - then nimble handling takes on new meaning and importance.
I especially appreciate a lightweight front wheel&tire.

I also 100% agree that lesser body weight achieved through healthy diet and exercise is the best investment in improving every bike's performance.
__________________
70sFollis 072/71 Bottecchia Giro d Italia/72 Zeus Competition/78 Batavus Competition/80 Mondia Super/81 AustroDaimler Olympian/82 Harding(Holdsworth) Special/84 Pinarello Record/85 EM Corsa Extra/86 DeRosa Pro/88 Falcon Race/99 Pinarello Cadore/99 Calfee TetraPro/03 Macalu Cirrus/04 Tallerico: The less ridden = '97 CoMotion tandem + city bike, mtn bike, beach cruiser

Last edited by Wildwood; 02-24-19 at 10:05 AM.
Wildwood is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 09:47 AM
  #19  
Aubergine 
Bad example
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Seattle and Reims
Posts: 2,947
Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 771 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 13 Posts
For me also it is the wheels that make the difference. My bikes, loaded with water, lights, fenders, computer, etc (not to mention their mildly fatty owner) are surely over 30 pounds, but with decent wheels they are all a delight to ride. And if they are tubular wheels, just a bit more of a delight.
__________________
Keeping Seattle’s bike shops in business since 1978
Aubergine is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 10:22 AM
  #20  
smontanaro 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Evanston, IL
Posts: 3,320

Bikes: many

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 437 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
You should compare your vintage rides to a Huffy or a Murray, or a Schwinn Varsity.
I just shipped a Ladies Schwinn Racer from Chicago to Austin, TX. I had no trouble hoisting the bike up to my luggage scale to get an idea of the weight (38lbs) so I could estimate shipping charges. After boxing though, I needed to run an inner tube through the little knock-out handles in the box so I had something sturdy enough to hang it from for the final weigh-in (47lbs). I couldn't manage that what with the moving scale hook and bulkiness of the box, so had to get Ellen to help. She feeds the obsession in multiple ways.

Today, I took my Schwinn Speedster out to get in a workout and experience the windy conditions. That same luggage scale tells me it weighs just a skosh under 35lbs. Didn't notice that as a problem.
__________________
I prefer you contact me by email (skip.montanaro@gmail.com).
smontanaro is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 10:40 AM
  #21  
crank_addict
Senior Member
 
crank_addict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 6,420
Mentioned: 80 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1063 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 18 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by kross57 View Post
I know some bikes get a bad rap because they are heavier than others. But lets say my vintage bike weighs 25 pounds. When I park my butt in the saddle, it suddenly weighs 170. So, going down the road, what matters more? The 1 ounce I saved using drilled brake levers? Or the 12-ounce beer I skipped at lunch? In the final equation, how important is the bike weight, really? For high-end competitors who have leaned themselves out to the max, maybe. But for most of us?
How important is the bike weight?

All depends on what you expect out of it - just transportation, cargo usage, racing for prize money, etc..

Next- Human weight combined with bike.

The bike static, expenses zero energy. Meaning useless, regardless of weight.

Contrary to the human, who expenses energy even in a sleep state. It may be miniscule and poor -using any form of output power measurement such as watts or horsepower per weight. It can be better if physically fit, able to move its mass, improves if various attributes are used, converts fat to muscle or even lose mass.

Remember that useless zero output bike in static mode mentioned above? All has to be figured and added to the humans energy efficiency.

So the body has to expense energy to move the bikes mass too, but by lowering any related bike and cargo mass automatically improves output power.

But.... but... mass in gravity is your friend :")

Last edited by crank_addict; 02-24-19 at 10:43 AM.
crank_addict is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 11:00 AM
  #22  
jjhabbs 
Senior Member
 
jjhabbs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 1,253

Bikes: to many to list

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 131 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 2 Posts
Honestly. It doesnt matter.

Nobody asks what the zero to sixty time is in a 1957 chevy! Who cares! Its a 57 chevy.

JJ
__________________
From Illinois. Collector of many fine bicycles from all over the world. Subscribe to my Youtube channel. Just search John Haboush
jjhabbs is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 11:00 AM
  #23  
Pompiere
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NW Ohio
Posts: 2,461

Bikes: 1984 Miyata 310, 1986 Schwinn Sierra, 2011 Jamis Quest, 1980 Peugeot TH8 Tandem, 1992 Performance Parabola, 1987 Ross Mt. Hood, 1988 Schwinn LeTour, 1988 Trek 400T

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 217 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by smontanaro View Post
Today, I took my Schwinn Speedster out to get in a workout and experience the windy conditions. That same luggage scale tells me it weighs just a skosh under 35lbs. Didn't notice that as a problem.
In today's wind, those extra pounds would be an asset!
Pompiere is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 11:03 AM
  #24  
smontanaro 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Evanston, IL
Posts: 3,320

Bikes: many

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 437 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by jjhabbs View Post
Nobody asks what the zero to sixty time is in a 1957 chevy! Who cares! Its a 57 chevy.
I'm guessing it matters to some people.

__________________
I prefer you contact me by email (skip.montanaro@gmail.com).
smontanaro is offline  
Old 02-24-19, 11:08 AM
  #25  
randyjawa 
Senior Member
 
randyjawa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada - burrrrr!
Posts: 9,148

Bikes: 1958 Rabeneick 120D, 1968 Legnano Gran Premio, Rocky Mountain Cardiac

Mentioned: 144 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 594 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 31 Times in 29 Posts
Generally speaking, when seeking a decent vintage road bicycle, one can expect to find offerings between 22 pounds and 25 pounds. For my money, anything with-in those weight limits, or even less, is a good place to start, in my book. Have a look at these bicycle weights and the weights I took myself on my own bikes.

So, make no mistake, weight does play a factor in ride quality but the function it plays is, kinda, minimal. Wheel weight is a BIG player in ride quality. Geometry is a BIG player in ride quality. Your skill and fitness levels play a BIG part in ride quality. So does saddle fit. And bicycle fit. And so many other things that I sometimes wonder why we all get so hung up on weight.
__________________
Learn how to find, restore and maintain vintage road bicycles at... MY "TEN SPEEDS"

Last edited by randyjawa; 02-26-19 at 01:19 PM. Reason: forgot link
randyjawa is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.