Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Vintage Japanese bikes to collect

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Vintage Japanese bikes to collect

Old 03-02-19, 11:18 AM
  #1  
capnjonny 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
capnjonny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Saratoga calif.
Posts: 903

Bikes: Miyata 610(66cm), GT Vantara Hybrid (64cm), Nishiki International (64cm), Peugeot rat rod (62 cm), Trek 800 Burning Man helicopter bike, Bob Jackson frame (to be restored?) plus a never ending stream of neglected waifs from the Bike exchange.

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 293 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 315 Times in 135 Posts
Vintage Japanese bikes to collect

Vintage Italian bikes have gotten too expensive for a bloke like me to afford.

Japanese bikes are still reasonable in price

I am wondering which Japanese built bikes will become collectors items.

Should I start buying up some of these and stashing them away for my grandsons inheritance?

which Japanese built bikes are most likely to increase in value over the years?
capnjonny is offline  
Old 03-02-19, 11:31 AM
  #2  
Giacomo 1 
Senior Member
 
Giacomo 1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Queens NYC
Posts: 3,175

Bikes: Colnago Super, Basso Gap, Pogliaghi, Fabio Barecci, Torelli Pista, Miyata 1400A

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 315 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Generally speaking, most Japanese bikes were mass produced in big numbers, so most will not likely ever become truly collectible or valuable. There are just to many out there as well.

I'm sure there are a couple of brands that might be considered collectable, like 3Renshow, who I believed built there bikes more in the Italian tradition of hand-built, but you pay the same premium for them as you do for Italian bikes.
Giacomo 1 is offline  
Old 03-02-19, 11:34 AM
  #3  
Vonruden 
Gold Member
 
Vonruden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Ocean County, NJ
Posts: 3,036

Bikes: Looking for a Baylis or Wizard in 59-62cm range

Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 372 Post(s)
Liked 309 Times in 104 Posts
3Rensho, Zunow, Yamaguchi, Nagasawa, Cherubim, Ebisu, Hirose and many others
__________________
"My biggest fear is that when I die my wife will sell my bicycles for what I told her they cost."

Get on your bikes and ride!

https://instagram.com/norseamerican/
Vonruden is offline  
Likes For Vonruden:
Old 03-02-19, 11:48 AM
  #4  
Mr. 66
Senior Member
 
Mr. 66's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 2,560
Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 814 Post(s)
Liked 984 Times in 588 Posts
Ones like this will be coveted.
Not mine, the blue and gold are iconic.


Here is the one I bought last year, I've been a member of the cult ever since. I just put new built wheels, mavic hubs on Campy strada rims, very fast, bad ass.
Mr. 66 is offline  
Likes For Mr. 66:
Old 03-02-19, 11:57 AM
  #5  
markwesti
Senior Member
 
markwesti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Seal Beach Ca. On the right , next to Long Beach
Posts: 1,754

Bikes: 86' Centurion Ironman Cannondale "track"

Mentioned: 72 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 597 Post(s)
Liked 224 Times in 139 Posts
All the bikes that Vonruden said for sure . Also what Giacomo 1 said , you will pay a premium for those . How about just some fun equity . IMO the Centurion Ironman is a good deal , you usually can pick up a decent one for 200-300 . These were designed for racing . A few Co.'s built pretty much the same bike as the IM . Here are some of mine .

86' Ironman (chrome fork is my idea)



IMG_0191 by mark westi, on Flickr

This is a 84' Centurion Comp TA , IM's dad .


IMG_0192 by mark westi, on Flickr
markwesti is offline  
Likes For markwesti:
Old 03-02-19, 12:18 PM
  #6  
Piff 
Senior Member
 
Piff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Southern California
Posts: 1,018
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 469 Post(s)
Liked 227 Times in 147 Posts
What about a fuji finest? And the centurion turbo and nishiki tri a are very nice frames. But yes, the number made counts against them as collector's items. Katakura silk?
Piff is offline  
Old 03-02-19, 12:42 PM
  #7  
retyred
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,323
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Liked 30 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by Piff View Post
What about a fuji finest? And the centurion turbo and nishiki tri a are very nice frames. But yes, the number made counts against them as collector's items. Katakura silk?
I owned a Nishiki Ultimate for a while. Great looking bike, full Campy. Too small to ride. Sold it for $350, I believe. Wish I still had it.
retyred is offline  
Likes For retyred:
Old 03-02-19, 01:48 PM
  #8  
dddd
Ride, Wrench, Swap, Race
 
dddd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Northern California
Posts: 8,559

Bikes: Cheltenham-Pedersen racer, Boulder F/S Paris-Roubaix, Varsity racer, '52 Christophe, '62 Continental, '92 Merckx, '75 Limongi, '76 Presto, '72 Gitane SC, '71 Schwinn SS, etc.

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1285 Post(s)
Liked 820 Times in 581 Posts
Among more-mainstream brands, my '79 Fuji Professional comes to mind, very much a true race bike with aggressive geometry, tubulars and full Superbe 7s friction gruppo.

dddd is offline  
Likes For dddd:
Old 03-02-19, 01:57 PM
  #9  
dddd
Ride, Wrench, Swap, Race
 
dddd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Northern California
Posts: 8,559

Bikes: Cheltenham-Pedersen racer, Boulder F/S Paris-Roubaix, Varsity racer, '52 Christophe, '62 Continental, '92 Merckx, '75 Limongi, '76 Presto, '72 Gitane SC, '71 Schwinn SS, etc.

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1285 Post(s)
Liked 820 Times in 581 Posts
Others from Japan that I am hanging on to include a Konno Allez, a 1977 Centurion Semi-Pro, a nicer Zunow and a 1981 Bianchi Super.
dddd is offline  
Old 03-02-19, 03:13 PM
  #10  
rccardr 
aka: Dr. Cannondale
 
rccardr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 7,164

Bikes: Bob Jackson, Wizard, Pegoretti Duende, Merckx ProSLX, Pelizzoli, Cannondale ST, Schwinn Tempo, Schwinn Voyageur, Canyon Endurace, Richard Sachs, Davidson Discovery

Mentioned: 205 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1843 Post(s)
Liked 2,049 Times in 797 Posts
What others above have said- all good info.
Two pieces of advice if you are really collecting
1) Concentrate on the lowest production/highest initial cost representative models. For example, if looking at a Zunow, find a Z-1 Hummingbird with Pentalia stays. Few were made, fewer remain.
This even works for production models. If you're looking at Japanese produced Schwinns, check out the Prologue: a one (or possibly two) year model, sold as frame only, Prestige tubing. Again, few made, fewer remain.

2) Buy only examples that are pretty-much-perfect. You'll pay more, but if you're really talking about putting these away for 10-20 years in climate controlled storage, it will pay off. At least as much as any 'investment' grade bicycle ever will.

Finally, be prepared to pay today. Dive into this and you'll find that high quality Japanese collector-level bikes are about the same price as Italian.
__________________
Hard at work in the Secret Underground Laboratory...
rccardr is offline  
Old 03-02-19, 06:14 PM
  #11  
BikeWonder
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Calgary
Posts: 327
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 160 Post(s)
Liked 75 Times in 52 Posts
I've noticed Miyatas are becoming more expensive and desirable,but mostly the higher end stuff. Nishikis as well.

in Canada, Apollo by Kuwahara bikes sort of jumped in price.
BikeWonder is offline  
Old 03-02-19, 07:11 PM
  #12  
MB33 
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 140
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 76 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 17 Posts
I think the chrome lugged, high end Centurions from the late 70's -about 1980 will always be sought after. An excellent condition pearl orange Semi Pro would be one that I'd hang onto.
MB33 is offline  
Old 03-02-19, 07:23 PM
  #13  
artclone
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 1,272

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Suberbe, '92 (German) Centurion Equipe, '85 Schwinn Peloton, 1983ish Zunow Road Racer project, '69 Squanch Super Tourer, 1980 Bianchi Super Corsa, '82 Austro-Daimler Vent Noir, '89 Miyata 914 project, 1982ish Bianchi Rallye

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 293 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Will any of the bikes we love ever go up in value? Seems like we're at the peak or just after the peak for 60s-80s classic road bikes, Italian, Japanese, or otherwise.
artclone is offline  
Old 03-02-19, 07:44 PM
  #14  
crank_addict
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 7,152
Mentioned: 93 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 401 Times in 266 Posts
Definetly consider the premium Panasonic's (PICS build) and pray to find a 1989 to maybe 92 team.

Don't let the name throw you. Its one of those sort of generic like brand name that most think it's a bike that was sold at Kmart.

Seek high-end framesets. Many bikes have been cannibilized but with enough resources today, plenty of parts are out there.
crank_addict is offline  
Old 03-02-19, 08:11 PM
  #15  
aprieto28
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: California
Posts: 220

Bikes: Kuwahara Tandem, Centurion Ironman, Rossin, De bernardi, Schwinn Paramount, Giubilato, Gitane TDF, Medici, Scott Solice.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Liked 39 Times in 20 Posts


I recently bought this 100 percent Japanese Domestic Model 1982 NOS Miyata Professional frame directly from Japan. It's never been built. Chrome underneath paint. I hope it goes up in value over the years. Very possible one of a kind in USA. Paint color and Decals or lack of are different that the Domestic Models.
aprieto28 is offline  
Likes For aprieto28:
Old 03-02-19, 08:30 PM
  #16  
AngryFrankie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 614

Bikes: Trek 400 Elance, Losa Winner, 1994 Schwinn Paramount, Specialized Tarmac Pro, Miele SLX, Ibis Ripley, Colnago Oval CX, 84 Masi GC, 1986 Schwinn Voyageur, 1988 Schwinn Tempo, 1998 Schwinn Peloton, 1991 Paramount Ser3

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 145 Post(s)
Liked 65 Times in 43 Posts
Wow! Great examples. The blue aero Miyatas, Pro, Team etc...seem to be getting really great prices. Konno Allez bikes (they are out there. I grabbed one but after the poor girl telling me 5 times it was a 56, and driving about 80 miles, it was a 58). Any "aero" bikes. A Panasonic aero came up on ebay and went for a crazy price. I guess it's the "small number" editions. FUJI OPUS, any TANGE 1 bikes...I've seen a few 80's Japanese bikes from the big names that I would bet anything were outsourced to small Japanese master builder shops. They were just too good. I'd say watch for clues like Tange 1, Pro, Team, etc.. and don't buy the near misses if you hope they'll appreciate. A DX 4000 is not going to be coveted when there is a DX 5000 out there, or even a DX 6000!
AngryFrankie is offline  
Old 03-02-19, 09:25 PM
  #17  
Igor P
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
If you are looking to maximize your grandsons inheritance do not invest in the collectibles market.
Igor P is offline  
Old 03-02-19, 09:43 PM
  #18  
KLiNCK
Optically Corrected
 
KLiNCK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Posts: 582

Bikes: 2012 Specialized Sirrus , 2012 Specialized Roubaix Comp

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 105 Post(s)
Liked 66 Times in 30 Posts
Originally Posted by Igor P View Post
If you are looking to maximize your grandsons inheritance do not invest in the collectibles market.
^ This +1!
And always remember : "Buy low, sell high".
KLiNCK is offline  
Old 03-02-19, 10:05 PM
  #19  
garryg
Full Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Campbell River BC
Posts: 388
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 115 Post(s)
Liked 261 Times in 111 Posts
Once us baby boomers age another ten or fifteen years the vintage market will be much different. People will be giving away all those Colnagos
garryg is offline  
Old 03-02-19, 10:53 PM
  #20  
rjhammett
Senior Member
 
rjhammett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Saint Paul, Minnesota
Posts: 2,312

Bikes: 92 Colnago Master PIU, 83 Pinarello Record, 92 Tommaso, 92 Merckx MX Leader, 90 Serotta Colorado II, 99 Tommasini Sintesi, 90 Pinarello Montello, 89 Tommasini Super Prestige, 08 Look 585, 89 Merckx Corsa Extra, 72 Holdsworth Professional and 3 more

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 314 Post(s)
Liked 401 Times in 187 Posts
One of these.

rjhammett is offline  
Likes For rjhammett:
Old 03-02-19, 11:58 PM
  #21  
SurferRosa
señor miembro
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 6,389

Bikes: Old school lightweights

Mentioned: 77 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2675 Post(s)
Liked 3,785 Times in 2,010 Posts
Originally Posted by capnjonny View Post
Should I start buying up some of these and stashing them away for my grandsons inheritance?
How 'bout a Miyata mountain bike in black along with a shotgun. Think what will be most valued during the coming zombie apocalypse.
SurferRosa is offline  
Old 03-03-19, 03:53 AM
  #22  
microcord
Full Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Tokyo
Posts: 270
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 86 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 43 Posts
Originally Posted by Giacomo 1 View Post
Generally speaking, most Japanese bikes were mass produced in big numbers [...].
I imagine that this is true of Italian bikes as well.

There have been plenty of Japanese brands of non-mass-produced bikes: as well as those already mentioned, there've been Alps, Zephyr, Level, S W Watanabe, Makino, Kalavinka, Iribe, Quark, Pegasus, Peloton, Ohtaki, Iso, Baramon, Reminton, Raizin, Yanagi, Silk (post Katakura), Nagasawa, Amanda, Amuna ... and those are just off the top of my head. Several were/are one-man operations. There've been many more small companies besides.

I too would never dream of buying any bike as an investment.
microcord is offline  
Old 03-03-19, 07:57 AM
  #23  
Phil_gretz
Zip tie Karen
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Fair Oaks Ranch, TX
Posts: 7,005

Bikes: '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite, '18 Velobuild VB-R-022, '21 Tsunami SNM-100

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1464 Post(s)
Liked 1,537 Times in 804 Posts
Originally Posted by Igor P View Post
If you are looking to maximize your grandsons inheritance do not invest in the collectibles market.
I agree. Imagine your grandchildren talking after the funeral, "...bless his heart, Granddad loved these old bikes and things. What are we going to do with them? Maybe we should just gather then together and sell them off as a lot, using my "don'tneedit" app. [shutter clicks] There. Listed.."
Phil_gretz is offline  
Likes For Phil_gretz:
Old 03-03-19, 08:33 AM
  #24  
Giacomo 1 
Senior Member
 
Giacomo 1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Queens NYC
Posts: 3,175

Bikes: Colnago Super, Basso Gap, Pogliaghi, Fabio Barecci, Torelli Pista, Miyata 1400A

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 315 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by microcord View Post
I imagine that this is true of Italian bikes as well.

There have been plenty of Japanese brands of non-mass-produced bikes: as well as those already mentioned, there've been Alps, Zephyr, Level, S W Watanabe, Makino, Kalavinka, Iribe, Quark, Pegasus, Peloton, Ohtaki, Iso, Baramon, Reminton, Raizin, Yanagi, Silk (post Katakura), Nagasawa, Amanda, Amuna ... and those are just off the top of my head. Several were/are one-man operations. There've been many more small companies besides.
Yes, for sure you are correct, but those Japanese one-man shops and the bikes they built I think are rarities in the general bike world, and if you find one, you'll pay a high premium for it. The OP mentioned that he couldn't afford the Italian bikes and was looking for a cheaper alternative, so I don't think he will spend the money for these one - off Japanese bikes either.

I have no idea what kind of bikes the companies that you mentioned built, but I do know the Italian bikes were proven race winning designs, so for me, I would opt for the Italian, but that's just me!
Giacomo 1 is offline  
Old 03-03-19, 08:35 AM
  #25  
TugaDude
Senior Member
 
TugaDude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 3,142
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 473 Post(s)
Liked 449 Times in 326 Posts
Beat me to it

Originally Posted by Igor P View Post
If you are looking to maximize your grandsons inheritance do not invest in the collectibles market.
Not being a negative Nancy here but this is a terrible longterm strategy. Fun maybe, but foolish. You have as much chance of the bike's value increasing as you have your grandson selling them for scrap because he just wants rid of them. Your passion does not equal his. I doubt you'd even keep up with inflation. Your aim is very generous and I applaud you for wanting to help your family but there are much safer ways.
TugaDude is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2022 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.