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Current Market for Drillium?

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Current Market for Drillium?

Old 03-11-19, 01:27 PM
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rideandgoseek 
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Current Market for Drillium?

Good Afternoon,

I was recently talking with a good buddy of mine who is a fine machinist. He has never dabbled in drillium but once I showed him some pictures he really seemed to like the idea. I gave him a Campagnolo NR chainring to take home and he came back with the mock up below.

He did some stress assessments and found that with the drillium configured it would support twice the output of a tour rider before failure, which I have to imagine would be sufficiently strong for riders like myself and others in the C&V community.

My question is...what is the market for doing drillium on parts like this? He'd have to put some decent time in fabricating a mounting bracket to get the drilling done and I don't really want him to go through the trouble unless I plan on having him do a fair number of drillium projects. Are there others out there who have a desire to have their chainrings drilled or that would be interested in purchasing parts that have already been drilled?

Is there a greater market for things like brake levers, calipers and derailleurs? Obviously a different bracket would need to be built to drill each different part so I'm just trying to get an understanding if there is a large desire to have this done?

I know the work would be top notch as is all the fabricating he does.

Let me know your thoughts about the drillium market in general and/or if you might be interested in purchasing future parts that have been modified or if you'd want to send parts to him to be modified.

Thanks for your time and any light you can shed on the topic.

Best,

R&GS
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Old 03-11-19, 01:39 PM
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There's always a market, just very limited. The jig making, machine / tooling set-up and labor time from A to Z finishing is a very hard sell. Not even going to discuss CNC.

Though just for grins and only a few weeks ago did a very quick experiment drillium on a rear cog. Including the time making a primitive jig, and using a basic drill press - pretty sure I was done in 45 minutes, probably closer to only 30 min..

But that's just the basics and my respects go to the real masters. They have artistic and brilliant machinist skills. How they utilize a lathe and mill is a multi skilled activity.

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Old 03-11-19, 02:21 PM
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Originally Posted by crank_addict View Post
There's always a market, just very limited. The jig making, machine / tooling set-up and labor time from A to Z finishing is a very hard sell. Not even going to discuss CNC.
Though just for grins and only a few weeks ago did a very quick experiment drillium on a rear cog. Including the time making a primitive jig, and using a basic drill press - pretty sure I was done in 45 minutes, probably closer to only 30 min..
But that's just the basics and my respects go to the real masters. They have artistic and brilliant machinist skills. How they utilize a lathe and mill is a multi skilled activity.
Yeah... what he said.
I love the look, and might pay less than fifty bucks to have it done on a couple rings for some very special builds.
Your model looks great, although for aesthetics I might suggest eliminating all the smallest holes between the outer slots. The medium and large holes there look great IMHO.
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Old 03-11-19, 02:41 PM
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There are a couple guys on FB that seem to do well with pantographing old and newer groupsets. Many times the black anno is removed off newer groups for a classic look. Could consider that and drillium if he can do. Panto is nice and looks cool, some drillium does but could also be geared toward weight weenies.
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Old 03-11-19, 05:20 PM
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Jon Williams was the Master of Drillium. He passed away last year a few weeks before Eroica California.

Here's some of his art.
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Old 03-11-19, 07:07 PM
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speaking of the late Jon Williams, I got a handful of photos of his work at the last Classic Rendezvous gathering.....

Jon Williams work on Peter Weigle's CdM bike:





Tom A's Bob Jackson with a variety of Jon Williams' work












and a heavily worked Campy NR derailleur that Jon did for Dale B.



Steve in Peoria
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