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Nashbar Race SIS

Old 03-14-19, 07:29 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
Then, like to-day, there was a lot of social status associated with the brand you rode. You could join the popular group by purchasing something like a Centurion Ironman or Bianchi Campione d'Italia. Or you could be ostracized for buying something like this Nashbar or the SR Triathlon. I remember licensed racers who bought low status bicycles to save some money and purposely stripped the decals and head badge, in an attempt to disguise the origin.
Really? Ouch. I used to look thru the Nashbar catalog and dream of having a Nashbar road bike... I thought they were a bargain, with well reasoned part selection. Got a personal list of the "haves" and "have not's" brands from the 80's?
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Old 03-15-19, 06:31 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by uncle uncle View Post
Really? Ouch. I used to look thru the Nashbar catalog and dream of having a Nashbar road bike... I thought they were a bargain, with well reasoned part selection. Got a personal list of the "haves" and "have not's" brands from the 80's?

Well, perhaps that subject deserves it's own thread. However, I'll give you one from the 1970s - C.Itoh. Even today they're routinely trashed by forum members as crap, junk, POS, etc. Even Sheldon Brown is on record as saying that they were "pretty crummy bikes". However, they were a full range marketing brand from a Japanese trading company who used Bridgestone as their source. The top model was similar to the Bridgestone Diamond Road, which is a revered bicycle.


I agree that the Nashbar bicycles were typically intelligently spec'd and good value, though the shipping costs often erased most of the value. It's great when cyclists can see past the brand name to assess the bicycle on actual parameters, such as tubing, components, features, geometry and workmanship. Unfortunately, that is not always the case.
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Old 03-15-19, 07:09 AM
  #28  
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The thing about Nashbar is that they did a poor job of protecting their brand image, and sold a lot of Nashbar-branded budget-priced, homely ill-fitting bike clothing, shoes, tires, and other bike gear. So when you have a Nashbar frame, it could be a Colnago underneath the paint, but your mind still associates it with all the cheap generic gear Nashbar sold.

It's not exactly a logical process, but desirable premium brands got there by carefully creating, promoting and protecting their image. Slapping your brand name on any cheap trinket you got a good deal on has consequences.
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Old 03-16-19, 07:38 AM
  #29  
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Eric, really great find.

T-Mar pretty much covered all the bases except...

Those tires are unsafe to ride for several reasons.

1. The rim cement (glue) holding the tubular tires onto the rim can be up to 33 years old and has dried out and lost it's adhesiveness. Air pressure may be all that's holding the tires on the rims. You can see how the tire has crept on the rim. The valve stem can pull out of the tire!

2. Even worse, the adhesive that holds the rim strip to the tire casing is probably dried out too making it easy for the tire to roll off, more so than just dried out rim cement.

Sewups/tubulars can be a joy to ride, especially in areas where you don't encounter goat head thorns. They require more attention than clinchers to keep them going. The most common sewups have cross sections 20mm to 23mm in diameter. Larger diameter sewup tires are becoming popular but they tend to be expensive. Also, folks who believe the hype about running high tire pressures have more problems with them. I run 90-95 psi.

I use Tufo Rim Tape to mount my sewups. It's a lot faster and mess free compared to rim cement. I also use Tufo sealant in them. There are other brands on the market but I know the stuff works.

Shimano 600 components are still good stuff. The rear derailleur can handle a 28T freewheel without any problems. With some trial and error on chain length, it should be able to handle a 30T or even 32T freewheel.

Tange # 2 tubing is no slouch! The wall thickness of Tange # 2 is slightly thicker than Tange # 1 tubing - 70 grams (2.5 ounces). Tange # 2 had just about the same wall thicknesses as Columbus SL tubing.

Take care of those tires, either have the rims switched to clinchers or get some new sewups. There's lot's of source online with help for running sewups.

Ride your bike and enjoy it.

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Old 03-17-19, 04:06 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by jlaw View Post
Nice bike - very good condition - with higher-end components and frame....not something I normally associate with a Nashbar-labeled bike. Good find.

I hear you re: the existing gearing not being suitable for hill-climbing. The good news is that there are various ways to improve upon this - some more affordable than others - and this bike is worth upgrading if it is a comfortable ride.

One other suggestion - remove the front fork and examine the welds and base metal where the steerer tube connects to the crown and where the forks connect to the crown - an integrity check is a good idea before you go ripping down a hill.

Good luck.
Haven't counted teeth yet. Does anyone know what the gearing is?
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Old 03-17-19, 04:16 PM
  #31  
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I was told the bike was ridden like not at all because it was a gift in college and was too small for the recipient. As to serial number, I may post that soon. Was shopping for tires today. Was considering Michelin Power Competition from Amazon but may get something at a LBS, probably clinchers.

Would prefer not to change gearing now. I shifted into lowest gear and moved okay. I will be able to judge better my second time.
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Old 03-18-19, 08:08 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by eric044 View Post
Haven't counted teeth yet. Does anyone know what the gearing is?
Stock gearing was spec'd as 42-52T chain rings with a 13-14-15-17-19-21T freewheel, which was considered a general purpose competition gear range for the era.

Also, with respect to the statement, "As to serial number, I may post that soon.". The forum correct response would be, "As to serial number, I will post that ASAP."
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Old 03-18-19, 08:38 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by Lemond1985 View Post
The thing about Nashbar is that they did a poor job of protecting their brand image, and sold a lot of Nashbar-branded budget-priced, homely ill-fitting bike clothing, shoes, tires, and other bike gear. So when you have a Nashbar frame, it could be a Colnago underneath the paint, but your mind still associates it with all the cheap generic gear Nashbar sold.

It's not exactly a logical process, but desirable premium brands got there by carefully creating, promoting and protecting their image. Slapping your brand name on any cheap trinket you got a good deal on has consequences.
Agreed about Nashbar. I've bought a fair bit of stuff from them over many years. I think I regretted buying almost of half of it, or at least it seems that way. Some of the clothing was pretty awful. And then there are the gems. Once I bought a $300 complete fixed gear bike with low expectations, and it turned out to be very nice. It was the only new bike I've bought since 1979.
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Old 03-18-19, 05:19 PM
  #34  
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Thinking about the tubes on steel classics. Do race bikes like mine have larger diameter tubes than Bianchi Classica?
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Old 03-18-19, 07:03 PM
  #35  
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The handlebar tape felt thin and good. Maybe a carbon.
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Old 03-18-19, 07:04 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by eric044 View Post
Thinking about the tubes on steel classics. Do race bikes like mine have larger diameter tubes than Bianchi Classica?

Slightly oversize steel tubes were just starting to appear in the mid-1980s. Masi introduced their revolutionary Volumetrica circa 1984 but it used custom internal lugs. Oversize steel tubes on road bicycles did not become a trend until circa 1990 when manufacturers started to use the TIG welded construction of ATBs to free themselves from lugs. With few exceptions, steel, derailleur equipped road bicycles from pre-1990 used standard diameter tubing, in either the imperial or metric standard, which are similar but slightly different. Some inexpensive, pre-boom and boom 10 speeds did use a smaller diameter tubing. These were typically American manufacturers who adpted existing roadster and 3 speed frames. So, yes, a competition bicycle like your Nashbar and a recreational model like a Classica, would use the same diameter tubing.
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Old 03-19-19, 02:32 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
Still no serial number,
FN62518. Could you tell me seat post dimension for a saddle bag? I assume the rails are standard road. Would you recommend a frame bag instead?

Last edited by eric044; 03-19-19 at 02:39 PM.
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Old 03-21-19, 07:33 AM
  #38  
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The valve separated from the tire. The tire otherwise appears to be in good condition. Will look into whether I should use glue to install valve into tire.

Last edited by eric044; 03-21-19 at 08:37 AM.
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Old 03-24-19, 03:37 PM
  #39  
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Saw this kinda odd Nashbar for sale on CL. The triple triangle was a real head-shaker. I thought only GT had those:





https://modesto.craigslist.org/bik/d...847918969.html
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Old 03-25-19, 10:39 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by Lemond1985 View Post
Saw this kinda odd Nashbar for sale on CL. The triple triangle was a real head-shaker. I thought only GT had those:
The subject bicycle is a 1987 Nashabar Road Alpha 5000. Nashar had triple triangle designs that pre-date this, going back to at least 1985. I don't believe that GT had even ventured out of BMX by this time.

Shogun also marketed several triple triangle designs in the late 1980s. but the frame design goes back to the 1923 when it was invented by an Englishman, Fred Hellens. As a tribute to the inventor, these frames are called Hellenic designs in England. Notable English practitioners included Hetchins and Thanet. The style goes in and out fashion periodically.
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Old 03-25-19, 12:34 PM
  #41  
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Wow, thanks T-Mar. I had no idea there was so much history behind this design.
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Old 03-25-19, 02:01 PM
  #42  
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GT was in the MTB market in 1985, but did not do a triple triangle until 1987

heres my 1986 GT Backwoods
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Old 03-28-19, 04:55 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by fleslider View Post
my 1986 GT Backwoods
Just before the junction with the seattube, does the toptube flare out wider, or is that section made out a bit of larger diameter tubing, or is that just an apparent illusion from the photo?
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Old 03-29-19, 07:04 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by lasauge View Post
Just before the junction with the seattube, does the toptube flare out wider, or is that section made out a bit of larger diameter tubing, or is that just an apparent illusion from the photo?
I don't know how they achieved this on the very early ATB models like the Backwoods but once they went to the triple triangle design shortly afterwards, it was achieved by a combination of tube sizes and shapes. The top tube was 1/8" larger in diameter than the seat tube and the top tube was further ovalized at the back end, with the major diameter oriented laterally. This provided sufficient top tube width to allow it to be pierced by the set tube and provide the distinctive.Manx tail.

In the case of the subject Backwoods it appears to be an oversized top tube with a back end that further enlarged but not ovalized. However, I've never seen one in person, so we'll have to wait for flesider to respond, to be sure.
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Old 03-29-19, 01:00 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
I don't know how they achieved this on the very early ATB models like the Backwoods but once they went to the triple triangle design shortly afterwards, it was achieved by a combination of tube sizes and shapes. The top tube was 1/8" larger in diameter than the seat tube and the top tube was further ovalized at the back end, with the major diameter oriented laterally. This provided sufficient top tube width to allow it to be pierced by the set tube and provide the distinctive.Manx tail.

In the case of the subject Backwoods it appears to be an oversized top tube with a back end that further enlarged but not ovalized. However, I've never seen one in person, so we'll have to wait for flesider to respond, to be sure.
Correct the top tube flares just before the seat tube. and the seat tube is going through the top tube . And TMar is correct its not ovalized , here is a pic of the rear cap on the top tube. As far as i know there was only two MTB models in 1985 and 1986 the Backwoods and Timberline. Maybe TMar has more info on them as it is scarce out there..

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Old 04-14-19, 05:25 PM
  #46  
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27" rims or 700c rims? Trying to stretch tubular tires and don't know.
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Old 04-15-19, 07:01 AM
  #47  
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Tubulars come in different sizes but these are 700C equivalent, which is the most common size. You'll see 27" and 28" on some tubular tyres but the three are all the same diameter. I say "equivalent" because 700C is technically a designation for beaded tyres and tubulars do not have beads.
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