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And you thought your seatpost was stuck.

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And you thought your seatpost was stuck.

Old 03-26-19, 07:56 PM
  #51  
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Originally Posted by sloar View Post


I soaked it 48 hours and heated it with a heat gun, not to extreme. I really didn’t think I applied to much force. Nothing I haven’t done before with success.
Fluted and buried, not a good thing. At least you get a spare fork out of the deal.
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Old 03-26-19, 08:09 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by sloar View Post


I soaked it 48 hours and heated it with a heat gun, not to extreme. I really didn’t think I applied to much force. Nothing I haven’t done before with success.
FWIW, I had a similar result, not as much tube twisting but a seat lug shatter while trying to remove a stuck post on a Trek, 710 frame. Like you I did not think I had applied that much force. I used the saddle to get leverage and when it felt like it broke loose, the lug went. Sorry you lost a nice frame.
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Old 03-26-19, 09:06 PM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by Lemond1985 View Post
"The Six Million Dollar Mechanic"
Paging... "Bicycle Repairman!"

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2howud
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Old 03-26-19, 09:52 PM
  #54  
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That frame is no longer safe to ride.
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Old 03-26-19, 10:42 PM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by Jeff Wills View Post
Paging... "Bicycle Repairman!"

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2howud
-ing to see what people come up with, ID-ing the bikes in the skit.
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Old 03-27-19, 02:30 AM
  #56  
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Ironman rode hard and put away wet

I got this 1987 Ironman for $80 less saddle and wheels. It came from a Tri rider down in SoCal and was probably exposed to salt water.



Those IM bikes were equipped with a stupid choice of seatposts; this deeply fluted Sugino that allowed water to run down the seat tube.



The seatpost was stuck, the seller had tried to remove it in a bench vice. I sawed the top off to cut a slot in the stuck portion so that I could collapse it.





I used a folding buck saw and a jab saw being careful not to cut into the seat tube.





It took me about 2 hours. When the seatpost was cut all the way through to the bottom I had to use 20" Channel Lock pliers to crush the seatpost enough to get to it to break free from the seat tube. Notice the extreme corrosion at the bottom.



Finished project. I put in a new BB and went through everything on the bike to remove all the corrosion. Lots of grease on the seatpost and stem.



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Old 03-27-19, 06:39 AM
  #57  
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^^^ nice job Chas, Are those the bars that came with the bike just turned over? I guess you tried squirting PB blaster or Liquid Wrench down each of those fluted channels to no avail?
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Old 03-27-19, 07:28 AM
  #58  
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My stuck seat post in my Zunow


Lye


Big drill
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Old 03-27-19, 07:40 AM
  #59  
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seat tubes are very thin at the top, so the damage on the OP's Trek is not too surprising. There is a local f-builder that used to remove seatposts until he messed up a high-zoot frame. One of his tricks was to hang the seatpost from a beam in his basement and use a jack to pull the frame towards the floor. His main method was to mount the frame on his lathe and drill out the seatpost. It turns out that you want to use a smaller drillbit, because when I tried that the chips from the seatpost distorted the seat tube from the inside.

I still have a fixture for holding a frame in my lathe, but I'm afraid to use it since the first experience wasn't good. I should ask the lbs to save some frames with stuck seatposts for me.
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Old 03-27-19, 09:16 AM
  #60  
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That is a 22mm drill bit with a 1/2 shank. I C clamped the frame to my bench and it worked but I still had to use lye.
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Old 03-27-19, 02:28 PM
  #61  
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Originally Posted by madpogue View Post
Refund? REfund?! REFUND???!!!!??
Rimborso, Papà.

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Old 03-27-19, 07:39 PM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by joeswamp View Post
These pictures frighten me. Did you soak the seatpost in anything or try to freeze it before attempting to get it out?

I have a stuck seatpost in an old bike I really like, but since the seatpost is at about the right height I haven't done anything about it. It's been stuck since I got the bike a few years ago.

At some point I will attempt to free it up. My plan will be:

1) Repeatedly soak for a month or so in Kroil.
2) Freeze the seatpost/top of frame with salt/ice in bags (or maybe dry ice) for a few hours
3) Clamp a large hardwood clamp around the post and attach a 10lb slide hammer
4) Wrap a towel soaked in boiling water around the seat tube (to quickly heat the tube relative to the post) and start banging away with the slide hammer

I'm hoping I can save the post and frame. I hate the idea of twisting the post to free it up, as frames aren't really designed to take forces like that. Most corrosion is brittle so any sharp impacts you can put on the post should help to break it free.

Is this considered best practice or is there something else I should do?
I'm in pretty much the same situation. If I ever get brave enough, my plan is to go with the "saw" method shown above.
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Old 03-27-19, 08:28 PM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by Headpost View Post
Originally Posted by joeswamp
These pictures frighten me. Did you soak the seatpost in anything or try to freeze it before attempting to get it out?

I have a stuck seatpost in an old bike I really like, but since the seatpost is at about the right height I haven't done anything about it. It's been stuck since I got the bike a few years ago.

At some point I will attempt to free it up. My plan will be:

1) Repeatedly soak for a month or so in Kroil.
2) Freeze the seatpost/top of frame with salt/ice in bags (or maybe dry ice) for a few hours
3) Clamp a large hardwood clamp around the post and attach a 10lb slide hammer
4) Wrap a towel soaked in boiling water around the seat tube (to quickly heat the tube relative to the post) and start banging away with the slide hammer

I'm hoping I can save the post and frame. I hate the idea of twisting the post to free it up, as frames aren't really designed to take forces like that. Most corrosion is brittle so any sharp impacts you can put on the post should help to break it free.
.
Is this considered best practice or is there something else I should do?I'm in pretty much the same situation. If I ever get brave enough, my plan is to go with the "saw" method shown above.
If it is an aluminum alloy post in a steel frame, you can also try soaking it in ammonia. Over time, aluminum can chemically bond to steel if there's enough humidity. Ammonia (hopefully) dissolves the bond, without damaging the post and frame.

But, hope is a fickle mistress.

A Trek Elance 310 I build had sat outside for several years. The post was STUCK.

I soaked it in ammonia for a week, it didn't loosen up.

I tried thermal cycling - alternating passes with a heat gun and an ice bath, it didn't loosen up.

I tried soaking it in PB Blaster for a week, it didn't loosen up.

I tried clamping on an old stem and fork, to use as a lever. It didn't loosen up, and I stopped before I bent or broke my frame. I very easily could have pretzled my frame like Sloar did.

I cut the top of it off, and took a hacksaw blade and cut a slit vertically down the length of the post from the inside. It didn't loosen up.


Keep in mind these were all ways of loosening up posts that had worked for me in the past.


I cut 6 more slits vertically down the length of the post, it didn't loosen up.

I snapped the top of the post off attempting to fold the slivers of the post in on themselves.

So here's the post with slits cut in it, and not able to make it break loose from the seat tube:





I figured I should google for other ideas before taking the frame to a machine shop to try to have it drilled out.

I found the following v

(cue sounds of harps playing, and the clouds parting to allow a shaft of sun to gently bathe my frame in mellow golden light)


So I plugged up the bottom of the seat tube with silicone caulking - above where it meets the bottom bracket. I let the silicone cure for a week.


I bought a container of 100% lye crystals from Lowe's, it was $12.

I used gloves, safety goggles, and long sleeve shirts.

Do NOT fool around with lye, it will happily turn your skin, muscle, and fat into soap, leaving a nice crater where your exposed body parts used to be.

I used an old plastic measuring cup and put 500ml lukewarm water in it, then 4 capfuls of lye crystals.

DO NOT use hot water for this.

SLOWLY and CAREFULLY and GENTLY pour the crystals into the lid, and then GENTLY pour them into the water. GENTLY stir the crystals after each pour - you do not want to mix a larger volume of the crystals with water.

SLOWLY and CAREFULLY and GENTLY pour the lye solution into the seatpost. It will start bubbling away like one of those 'mudpot' geysers in Yellowstone. Let it sit for a few hours.

Carefully dump the sludge out and test if you can remove the post. If you can, rinse everything THOROUGHLY and congratulate yourself. Otherwise, prepare another batch of solution and repeat the process.

Mine took 1 and a half containers of crystals over 4 days.


Remnants of post after an invigorating lye spa treatment:




The lye solution will attack paint and any aluminum it comes in contact with. In my case, it bubbled over where the seat stays join the seat tube, and also down the back of the seat tube. This caused my paint to either get discolored / scorched looking, or be peeled away.
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Old 03-27-19, 09:03 PM
  #64  
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Ironman Replacement Components

Originally Posted by Deal4Fuji View Post
^^^ nice job Chas, Are those the bars that came with the bike just turned over? I guess you tried squirting PB blaster or Liquid Wrench down each of those fluted channels to no avail?
The first thing to go were the Tri Bars. They reminded me of the radar array on WW II German night fighters!




I picked up the partial frame to build a wet weather beater so I didn't want to invest a lot of money into it. I got the bars, stem and seat post from a local co-op cheap. I also got the NOS wheel set there too for $80-$100 - Shimano hubs with Mavic MA2 rims.

As with any $150 project, it quickly went over budget with tires, tubes, rim strips, pedals, BB, toe clips and straps, cassette, chain, saddle, brake levers, bar tape, plus new cables and housing. I figure my beater project cost me ~$350!

Never bothered with any chemicals, figured between rust and galvanic corrosion the seat post was in there to stay. I was right.

Afterward I ran a reamer down the seat tube to clean out the corrosion and then honed it out for a smooth surface so that the seatpost could be easily adjusted. LOTS OF GREASE TOO!

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Old 03-28-19, 07:21 AM
  #65  
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Originally Posted by RandolphCarter View Post
If it is an aluminum alloy post in a steel frame, you can also try soaking it in ammonia. Over time, aluminum can chemically bond to steel if there's enough humidity. Ammonia (hopefully) dissolves the bond, without damaging the post and frame.

But, hope is a fickle mistress.

A Trek Elance 310 I build had sat outside for several years. The post was STUCK.

I soaked it in ammonia for a week, it didn't loosen up.

I tried thermal cycling - alternating passes with a heat gun and an ice bath, it didn't loosen up.

I tried soaking it in PB Blaster for a week, it didn't loosen up.

I tried clamping on an old stem and fork, to use as a lever. It didn't loosen up, and I stopped before I bent or broke my frame. I very easily could have pretzled my frame like Sloar did.

I cut the top of it off, and took a hacksaw blade and cut a slit vertically down the length of the post from the inside. It didn't loosen up.


Keep in mind these were all ways of loosening up posts that had worked for me in the past.


I cut 6 more slits vertically down the length of the post, it didn't loosen up.

I snapped the top of the post off attempting to fold the slivers of the post in on themselves.

So here's the post with slits cut in it, and not able to make it break loose from the seat tube:





I figured I should google for other ideas before taking the frame to a machine shop to try to have it drilled out.

I found the following video on YouTube

(cue sounds of harps playing, and the clouds parting to allow a shaft of sun to gently bathe my frame in mellow golden light)


So I plugged up the bottom of the seat tube with silicone caulking - above where it meets the bottom bracket. I let the silicone cure for a week.


I bought a container of 100% lye crystals from Lowe's, it was $12.

I used gloves, safety goggles, and long sleeve shirts.

Do NOT fool around with lye, it will happily turn your skin, muscle, and fat into soap, leaving a nice crater where your exposed body parts used to be.

I used an old plastic measuring cup and put 500ml lukewarm water in it, then 4 capfuls of lye crystals.

DO NOT use hot water for this.

SLOWLY and CAREFULLY and GENTLY pour the crystals into the lid, and then GENTLY pour them into the water. GENTLY stir the crystals after each pour - you do not want to mix a larger volume of the crystals with water.

SLOWLY and CAREFULLY and GENTLY pour the lye solution into the seatpost. It will start bubbling away like one of those 'mudpot' geysers in Yellowstone. Let it sit for a few hours.

Carefully dump the sludge out and test if you can remove the post. If you can, rinse everything THOROUGHLY and congratulate yourself. Otherwise, prepare another batch of solution and repeat the process.

Mine took 1 and a half containers of crystals over 4 days.


Remnants of post after an invigorating lye spa treatment:




The lye solution will attack paint and any aluminum it comes in contact with. In my case, it bubbled over where the seat stays join the seat tube, and also down the back of the seat tube. This caused my paint to either get discolored / scorched looking, or be peeled away.


I went a different route on my Fuji. I bought this as a challenge to myself it was seized and cut at the lug. I made a make shift slide hammer with theaded rod a nut and washers.
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Old 03-28-19, 07:25 AM
  #66  
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Old 03-28-19, 08:17 AM
  #67  
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I really like that approach -- looks like you got a nut and heavy washer inside the tube under the seatpost. Allows you to get lots of sharp impacts on the brittle corrosion with no twisting of the seat tube. Only tough part is that you'd need a washer/spacer that's a reasonably close fit to the inside of the seat tube, without being so close that it gets stuck itself!
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Old 03-28-19, 08:27 AM
  #68  
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Next stuck seatpost, I might try a 50/50 mix of acetone and automatic transmission fluid.

Some people use coke, probably because of the phosphoric acid
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Old 03-28-19, 01:54 PM
  #69  
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In that lye video, at 4:43, the woman coughs, and the man says, "Get away from here." She had inhaled some of the toxic fumes. I admire their caution, and they should have made a note of that incident.
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Old 03-28-19, 03:07 PM
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This thread makes me think maybe we shouldn't be using aluminum seatposts. Chromed steel posts don't make this much trouble. Sure, I remove and regrease things on my bikes, but not everyone does. And some of my bikes live in a very damp barn. By the time I got to them this year, they were screaming for some attention, and I wasn't a moment too soon.
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Old 03-28-19, 09:17 PM
  #71  
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Originally Posted by Mr. 66 View Post





No offense--because I surely don't know what I'm talking about since I've never done the procedure--but I can't help but notice, when looking at the remains of the seatpost, that you didn't saw the slots all the way through at the bottom. Was this not possible?

I saw a video on Youtube that recommended using a sawzall with a wood blade, which was claimed to be able to cut through aluminum passably but was less likely to cut through the steel of the frame. Not sure if anyone can confirm this, but that seems worth trying.
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Old 03-28-19, 09:32 PM
  #72  
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
This thread makes me think maybe we shouldn't be using aluminum seatposts. Chromed steel posts don't make this much trouble.
Well, sort of... the chromed steel seatpost in my green Superior had been jammed in the frame and then exposed to the weather. I ended up plugging the hole in the top, inverting the frame, and filling the seat tube with Liquid Wrench. After soaking for two days, I clamped the seatpost in a vice and used the frame for leverage. Fortunately it came loose.

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Old 03-28-19, 09:34 PM
  #73  
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Originally Posted by Headpost View Post
No offense--because I surely don't know what I'm talking about since I've never done the procedure--but I can't help but notice, when looking at the remains of the seatpost, that you didn't saw the slots all the way through at the bottom. Was this not possible?

I saw a video on Youtube that recommended using a sawzall with a wood blade, which was claimed to be able to cut through aluminum passably but was less likely to cut through the steel of the frame. Not sure if anyone can confirm this, but that seems worth trying.
Limit of the blade's reach, is how I saw that. And yes, a coarse tooth blade will tend to cut through a soft metal and not a harder metal. It won't leave steel completely unscathed, so caution is advised as you approach getting all the way through the post. That would be the time to switch to hand cutting, as your hand feel might help tell you when you're through the aluminum and contacting the steel.

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Old 03-28-19, 09:51 PM
  #74  
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
This thread makes me think maybe we shouldn't be using fluted aluminum seatposts.
Fixed that for you.
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Old 03-29-19, 03:49 AM
  #75  
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Sawsall Overkill

@Headpost using a Sawsall is beyond overkill and would be uncontrollable! I used a Lenox Folding TriSaw that takes Sawsall blades. I started the cut with a jab saw with a standard hacksaw blade.

Lenox makes an updated version of this tool.




Now for REALLY stuck stems and seatposts, Campagnolo has a solution:



verktyg Too much of a good thing is BETTER!
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