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Anybody recognize these brake levers?

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Anybody recognize these brake levers?

Old 04-14-19, 11:25 AM
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Anybody recognize these brake levers?

Not the first time I'm asking this question, but I'm a sucker for nice bits of aluminum. And for some reason especially nicely-made brake levers make me go all weak in the knees. So when I saw these at today's bike jumble I had to have them.

I haven't found any markings. At all. The outsides are nicely polished, on the insides the finish is slightly rougher.

Any idea where these came from?

(And yes, we have a dog and two cats and don't like vacuuming)



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Old 04-14-19, 02:07 PM
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What size bar does it clamp to?
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Old 04-14-19, 03:02 PM
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I am thinking 22.2, but with the slotted screw it may be larger.
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Old 04-14-19, 04:48 PM
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Never seen them. Very cool.
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Old 04-15-19, 03:56 PM
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Originally Posted by 3speedslow View Post
What size bar does it clamp to?
Originally Posted by dweenk View Post
I am thinking 22.2, but with the slotted screw it may be larger.
22.2 seems right. I seem to have misplaced my calipers, but I tried them on some bars I had lying around. They fit most, except the old Philippe bars, which I assume are the old French 23.5mm size.
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Old 04-15-19, 04:00 PM
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One characteristic - or drawback if you like - is that they require a perfectly straight tube, so no mounting them on or even near the bends.
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Old 04-15-19, 04:13 PM
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If they are 22.2 they could be motorcycle levers. The flattened elongated spoon shape of the lever (lacking a ball end also) reminds me of '60s BMWs. Are the screws metric or American or Whitworth? This could provide a clue. Early mountain bikers were known to use motorcycle levers, and some were even sold in cycling catalogs, so this might be a possibility even if they were taken off a bicycle.

One other thought is that if they're motorcycle levers from a bigger motorcycle, the cable hole in the lever may be for a larger diameter cable with a larger sized end. Smaller motorcycles and mopeds often used standard-ish bicycle cables.

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Old 04-17-19, 02:05 AM
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Originally Posted by scarlson View Post
If they are 22.2 they could be motorcycle levers. The flattened elongated spoon shape of the lever (lacking a ball end also) reminds me of '60s BMWs. Are the screws metric or American or Whitworth? This could provide a clue. Early mountain bikers were known to use motorcycle levers, and some were even sold in cycling catalogs, so this might be a possibility even if they were taken off a bicycle.

One other thought is that if they're motorcycle levers from a bigger motorcycle, the cable hole in the lever may be for a larger diameter cable with a larger sized end. Smaller motorcycles and mopeds often used standard-ish bicycle cables.

That possibility occurred to me, as I was searching for "leviers ancien" and quite a few moped and motorcycle levers turned up. These are not particularly big or bulky so I would not expect them to have come off a big machine.
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Old 04-17-19, 02:53 AM
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I was thinking moped or small motorcycle levers too. I used some on my first off road trekking bike that I built in 1976.

Drop bars were too hard on the hands and shoulders during steep fast descents on narrow rocky single tracks so I switched to uprights. Wimpy Weinmann upright levers didn't cut it. The MC levers were great. I think that they may have been from a small Aeromachi.

I also got some nice large diameter gum rubber grips off of some Italian MC or Scooter. They were at least 45mm in diameter and easy on the hands.

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