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Keeping original brake and shift housings. Hpow to lube?

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Keeping original brake and shift housings. Hpow to lube?

Old 05-16-19, 04:27 AM
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bark_eater 
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Keeping original brake and shift housings. How to lube?

I'm working on a Raleigh Sport and want to keep the original brake housings and cables if possible. I was wondering whats the best way to get some lube on them and what kind to use? I have extra brake cables on hand but would realy prefer to keep the shifter cable.

Last edited by bark_eater; 05-16-19 at 04:37 AM.
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Old 05-16-19, 05:27 AM
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I often smear grease along the cable then slide it back and forth inside the housing.
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Old 05-16-19, 07:14 AM
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Triflow works pretty well. It doesn't have the persistence of grease, but is easy to re-apply.
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Old 05-16-19, 07:18 AM
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I use automotive axle grease and coat the cable it's entire length.
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Old 05-16-19, 07:37 AM
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I revived the ribbed Raleigh cables on my 40yo Twentys by flushing out decades worth of dirt/grease with aerosol electrical contact cleaner, followed by Reducteur H72 to counter any corrosion then squirted through liquid lanolin for lubrication & future weather protection.

They now work as good as anything new, can't complain
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Old 05-16-19, 08:38 AM
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Before using any old cable housing or lube, please blow the housing out with compressed air. Don’t and you will be stuck with friction on the cables as the junk inside gets blended with any lube.

tri-flow is what I use for lube. Pls put up pics in the 3 speed thread !
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Old 05-16-19, 08:39 AM
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While disassembling and lubricating, also check the condition of the cable ends. If these get compromised or pinched, you will end up with excessive cable friction and wear.

Replacing the housing and cable on the rear brake of my Peugeot UO-8 made a huge difference in its effectiveness. (I use the front brake alone much of the time and had not realized just how ineffective the rear brake had gradually become over time.)
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Old 05-16-19, 08:47 AM
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Originally Posted by bark_eater View Post
I'm working on a Raleigh Sport and want to keep the original brake housings and cables if possible. I was wondering whats the best way to get some lube on them and what kind to use? I have extra brake cables on hand but would realy prefer to keep the shifter cable.
The brake cables have to be taken out completely. Whether the cables can be reused depends on how mangled the ends are where they clamp onto the brake calipers. If they are frayed at the very ends, cut off the last bit with cable cutters or ****s. If they are usable, take them out, clean as necessary. (EDIT: It's usually easier to simply use new cables. No reason not to)

Standard bike shop method from the pre teflon lining days was: take a glob of grease between your thumb and forefinger. Smear it along the length of the cable as evenly as possible. Put the cable back in. Grease BTW - everyone used grease.

Since this bike is very old, I'd supplement this by trimming and grinding any mangled ends on the housing. Flush and clean with something. Squirt some tri flow in there (optional). Proceed as above.

Depending on how much housing was used on the shift cable, you may be able to simply unscrew it at the hub, and slide it around to expose the parts that need to be greased.

Last edited by Salamandrine; 05-16-19 at 09:04 AM.
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Old 05-16-19, 09:26 AM
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One other little tweak when trying to re-vitalize housings:

take the ends and square them up by touching the housing to your bench grinder.

in general the cables don't stretch very much, but housings do compress, which contributes to poor lever feel and "sponginess" under braking.

Mark Petry
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Old 05-16-19, 09:40 AM
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Umm fellas... One slight hassle with Raleigh factory cables... they made them at factory with cast potmetal tips not crimps.

BiTD replacement cables were sold by Raleigh for each specific model with all the fittings & ferrules already in place, the whole assembly simply bolted on.

Can't easily buy these Raleigh ribbed cable assembles as NOS anymore; when resurrecting existing cables I try avoid removing the factory crimps in a vain attempt to keep it original.

Otherwise, why bother resurrecting old cable?
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Old 05-16-19, 10:13 AM
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Yes about Tamiya's point. I would release the cables at their pinch bolts and try to orient the cables/housings vertically and dribble some of 3 in 1 PFTE lube in the housing so it can run down the length of the housing. Then slide the cable back and forth a bit. I got the 3in1 stuff at Lowes. I haven't been using it long but my hope is that it lasts longer than Tri-Flow. Grease will not do much for you unless you remove the cables from the housing and sometimes, once that cable is removed, it will not go back in. If you are afraid of PFTE, and you can remove the cables, mix some grease and Tri-Flow in your finger tips and rub it into the full length of the cable.
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Old 05-16-19, 10:18 AM
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WD-40. Spray into ends of cable housing. Spray on brake pivot. Spray the whole bike. Tune up in a can.
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Old 05-16-19, 11:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Classtime View Post
If you are afraid of PFTE, and you can remove the cables, mix some grease and Tri-Flow in your finger tips and rub it into the full length of the cable.
Tri-Flow contains PTFE as well. So, avoiding contact by using nitrile gloves would be prudent, with either product.
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Old 05-16-19, 12:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Tamiya View Post
Umm fellas... One slight hassle with Raleigh factory cables... they made them at factory with cast potmetal tips not crimps.

BiTD replacement cables were sold by Raleigh for each specific model with all the fittings & ferrules already in place, the whole assembly simply bolted on.

Can't easily buy these Raleigh ribbed cable assembles as NOS anymore; when resurrecting existing cables I try avoid removing the factory crimps in a vain attempt to keep it original.

Otherwise, why bother resurrecting old cable?
Yeah, there was that kind. IIRC, there was also a kind with a cable clamp at the end by the adjusting barrel. It's been a long time since I worked on them, but I seem to recall these things getting shift cables replaced all the time in the 80s and 90s without using the factory premade units.

Strangely enough, it seems as though it's possible to buy new 'Raleigh' assemblies. Personally I'd probably try to oil the existing shifter cable in place. If the adjuster is spun off, there'll likely be plenty of slack to get to the cable around the shifter. Or, get a new assembly, but replace the inner cable only, using an adjuster thingie with a clamp.

https://www.amazon.com/Sturmey-Arche.../dp/B002K2HAN6

For the brakes, it's only sensible to use new cables.
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Old 05-16-19, 12:11 PM
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You can use an in-line cable lubricator:


https://www.amazon.com/Motion-Pro-08.../dp/B0012TYX9W

It clamps and seals around the end of the housing where the cable exits and has a port to accept the nozzle from an aerosol lubricant can. This forces the lubricant into the housing without removing the cable. Keep squirting until lubricant comes out the other end.

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Old 05-16-19, 12:14 PM
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Lots of good advice here, for me I draw the line at using 40 year old + consumables and since I like to ride my refurbs. I also like to trust that cables, brake pads and tires aren't going to fail me. YMMV

Hope you will post some pics of the Sport OP
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Old 05-16-19, 10:02 PM
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Originally Posted by big chainring View Post
WD-40. Spray into ends of cable housing. Spray on brake pivot. Spray the whole bike. Tune up in a can.
WD40 is a solvent, not a lubricant. Keep it away from your bike.
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Old 05-16-19, 10:26 PM
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Boeshield T-9. If you can't, or don't want to remove the cable from the housing, then re-install, Boeshield T-9 readily wicks down the cable, through the full length of housing. Just watch the far end until it drips out. Won't take much.

It's not as good as fresh cables and housings, but it'll do in a pinch to keep old cables usable longer. Less messy and smelly than grease, WD-40 or Triflow. Tried 'em all. Boeshield worked at least as well with less mess and odor.

But if the corrosion/oxidation is heavy, a penetrating fluid first might help. But as other folks noted, it might also loosen up gunk that gets trapped inside and makes the cable drag more.
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Old 05-17-19, 06:26 AM
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I use Shimano cable lube, in the small pot container. Pull the inner cable out of the housing, wipe clean with a lint free rag. Run some solvent cleaner through the housing and allow to drain and dry. Apply the cable lube to inner cable and reinstall in housing. Not too thick, very slick action and not too heavy so as to gum up the cables.

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Old 05-17-19, 11:01 AM
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My vote is tri-flow in this situation
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