Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

I bought it for the full Suntour Cyclone group...

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

I bought it for the full Suntour Cyclone group...

Old 06-01-19, 06:14 AM
  #26  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 19,443

Bikes: 1959 & 1960 Capo; 1982 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 708 Post(s)
Liked 32 Times in 30 Posts
My SunTour Cyclone II is my favorite rear derailleur by far. I graces my lowly UO-8, which was bought as a bare frame and has had nothing both SunTour rear derailleurs (V-GT for wide-range gearing for my wife, then V for me, then Cyclone when I pulled it off the PKN-10. (I put the original Simplex back on the PKN-10 when I gave it to our son. Bikes and bike components circulate around the family sometimes.)
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324
Capo: 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 06-01-19, 10:47 AM
  #27  
T-Mar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 17,967
Mentioned: 447 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2528 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 102 Times in 92 Posts
Thank-you for the serial number. It's definitely Maruishi manufacture from 1985, though at this time I have insufficient data to determine exactly when in 1985. However, based on the model designation, it's a 1986 model.

Last edited by T-Mar; 06-01-19 at 10:55 AM.
T-Mar is offline  
Old 06-02-19, 02:06 PM
  #28  
johnnyace 
Shut up and ride!
Thread Starter
 
johnnyace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Oregon
Posts: 1,089

Bikes: All the bikes

Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 477 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 17 Posts
Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
The tubeset is an unspecified Ishiwata CrMo double butted. The seat post diameter will confirm the grade but I suspect 022. FYI, the original MSRP was $374 US + $30.00 express shipping. Don't you wish you could still express ship a bicycle for that price?
Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
Thank-you for the serial number. It's definitely Maruishi manufacture from 1985, though at this time I have insufficient data to determine exactly when in 1985. However, based on the model designation, it's a 1986 model.
Thanks. So, based on the 27.0 seatpost, does this indicate Ishiwata 022?

As I have started to disassemble the bike this morning, and noticed the details, I find it amazing that such a nicely spec-ed bike like this was only $374 + $30 shipping in 1986! I paid $800 for the frameset alone on my Bianchi Specialissima in the mid-late 80s. This bike was an amazing value. You got the full Cyclone group (hubs and BB included) on a likely Ishiwata 022 frameset, Suntour Pro dropouts, Tange Levin headset, Laprade fluted seatpost, nice Araya rims... it's just very nice! Disassembly has been a breeze; no stuck seatpost or stem, no bits and pieces stuck anywhere. The Cyclone levers shine like new, with no road rash.

I've got some small parts and pieces soaking in Evapo-Rust for minor surface rust, but it's in great shape. And hurray for Japanese consistency of quality, practicality, and standards.

The only issue it seems to have is the headset. I haven't taken it apart yet to determine the cause, but if I need to replace it, I'll probably put a Hatta Swan on there.





johnnyace is offline  
Old 06-02-19, 10:11 PM
  #29  
AngryFrankie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 461

Bikes: Trek 400 Elance, Losa Winner, 1994 Schwinn Paramount, Specialized Tarmac Pro, Miele SLX, Ibis Ripley, Colnago Oval CX, 84 Masi GC, 1986 Schwinn Voyageur, 1988 Schwinn Tempo, 1998 Schwinn Peloton, 1991 Paramount Ser3

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 91 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 7 Posts
I've had that exact bike, down to the rising sun decal and superbe pro dropouts. Great riding bike.
AngryFrankie is offline  
Old 06-03-19, 08:14 AM
  #30  
T-Mar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 17,967
Mentioned: 447 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2528 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 102 Times in 92 Posts
Originally Posted by johnnyace View Post
Thanks. So, based on the 27.0 seatpost, does this indicate Ishiwata 022?

As I have started to disassemble the bike this morning, and noticed the details, I find it amazing that such a nicely spec-ed bike like this was only $374 + $30 shipping in 1986! I paid $800 for the frameset alone on my Bianchi Specialissima in the mid-late 80s. This bike was an amazing value. You got the full Cyclone group (hubs and BB included) on a likely Ishiwata 022 frameset, Suntour Pro dropouts, Tange Levin headset, Laprade fluted seatpost, nice Araya rims... it's just very nice! Disassembly has been a breeze; no stuck seatpost or stem, no bits and pieces stuck anywhere. The Cyclone levers shine like new, with no road rash.

I've got some small parts and pieces soaking in Evapo-Rust for minor surface rust, but it's in great shape. And hurray for Japanese consistency of quality, practicality, and standards.

The only issue it seems to have is the headset. I haven't taken it apart yet to determine the cause, but if I need to replace it, I'll probably put a Hatta Swan on there.
The Japanese were the masters of trickle down technology, value added engineering and Quality Control during this era. Thanks to their efforts, the performance discrepancies between bicycle levels were shrinking. A mid-1980s mid-range model was better than a high end model of only a decade earlier and the differences between a mid-range and high end model, other than price, were shrinking. During the late 1980s a lot of cyclists were questioning the need for a high end super bicycle when the Japanese mid-range models were so good. The competitive, discerning or status conscious cyclist might still make a high end purchase but for the typical cyclist, the return on investment for the price increase wasn't warranted, with the Japanese mid-range models providing the best value.

Regarding the post diameter, 27.0mm would actually be indicative of Ishiwata 024. As I stated earlier, the Nashbar literature did not disclose which grade of Ishiwata tubeset. Ishiwata 024 was only 185g heavier than 022, and the difference would have been somewhat less in a built frame. It appears that Nashbar's cost concession was where the customer couldn't see it, behind the generic tubing tubing.

Regarding the price, it appears that was a special introductory offer. I checked some later catalogues to see if they had updated the specs to mention the tubeset and it was selling in the summer for $374 US + $30 US shipping. It's not a huge price increase but still notable, at approximately 7%.

I'm glad to hear that you are enjoying your new acquisition.

Last edited by T-Mar; 06-03-19 at 08:19 AM.
T-Mar is offline  
Likes For T-Mar:
Old 06-03-19, 01:09 PM
  #31  
johnnyace 
Shut up and ride!
Thread Starter
 
johnnyace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Oregon
Posts: 1,089

Bikes: All the bikes

Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 477 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 17 Posts
Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
The Japanese were the masters of trickle down technology, value added engineering and Quality Control during this era. Thanks to their efforts, the performance discrepancies between bicycle levels were shrinking. A mid-1980s mid-range model was better than a high end model of only a decade earlier and the differences between a mid-range and high end model, other than price, were shrinking. During the late 1980s a lot of cyclists were questioning the need for a high end super bicycle when the Japanese mid-range models were so good. The competitive, discerning or status conscious cyclist might still make a high end purchase but for the typical cyclist, the return on investment for the price increase wasn't warranted, with the Japanese mid-range models providing the best value.

Regarding the post diameter, 27.0mm would actually be indicative of Ishiwata 024. As I stated earlier, the Nashbar literature did not disclose which grade of Ishiwata tubeset. Ishiwata 024 was only 185g heavier than 022, and the difference would have been somewhat less in a built frame. It appears that Nashbar's cost concession was where the customer couldn't see it, behind the generic tubing tubing.
Yeah, back then (I was in my late teens-early twenties) I felt like I had to have the Italian steel, and mostly turned my nose up at the Japanese bikes, although I did entertain the idea for a while of purchasing a steel Specialized Allez instead of the Bianchi. Now that I'm older (and hopefully at least a little wiser!), I have a deep appreciation for the Japanese steel, and the only Italian stuff I buy is for flipping, when I find a deal too good to pass up.

Thanks again for the info!
johnnyace is offline  
Old 08-12-19, 09:56 AM
  #32  
jdave5917
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 47
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
1985 Nashbar Mark II

Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
While the rear derailleur is New Cyclone, which was released for the 1985 model year, my 1985 Nashbar literature shows the 1985 model still being the MK II. The MK III came out in 1986. Still, it could have been manufactured in late 1985. Most of the mid-1980s Nashbar bicycles were manufactured by Maruishi and, if so, the serial number will tell us the exact frame manufacture date. The tubeset is an unspecified Ishiwata CrMo double butted. The seat post diameter will confirm the grade but I suspect 022. FYI, the original MSRP was $374 US + $30.00 express shipping. Don't you wish you could still express ship a bicycle for that price?
Tmar - I am also currently working on a Mark II which I believe to be a 1985, since the Tange fork has an Oct 1985 date code on the steerer, and most other components have mid-1984 date codes. The frame build quality and the paint are both quite impressive. No rust at all at the top tube cable guides which, in my experience, is pretty unusual for 34 year old steel frames. What looks like missing paint on the seatstays in the photo are just reflections from the sun. I was shocked to see Suntour PRO dropouts on both the fork and the frame. As with the others, mine is the metallic red color and has Cyclone M-II derailleurs, Symmetric shifters, and the stylish Sakae crankset. Didn't ride it before disassembly, but I'm expecting it to be equal to or better than the mid-80s Trek 531 bikes and the higher-level, name-brand Japanese bikes of that era. Serial # from the bottom bracket is DZ25462 and the SR Laprade seat post diameter is 27.0 which you mentioned would give up the type of Ishiwata tubing used. Can you tell me which tubeset is on this bike? Also, I'd really appreciate a pdf of the applicable 1985 literature if you could email that to me or provide a link. Thanks.
jdave5917 is offline  
Old 08-12-19, 12:05 PM
  #33  
jeirvine 
Senior Member
 
jeirvine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Bethesda/Baltimore MD
Posts: 3,205

Bikes: '72 Moto Grand Record, '72 Gitane tandem, '72 Raleigh Super Course, '73 Raleigh Gran Sport, '73 and '76 Colnagos Super, '76 Fiorelli Coppi, '78 Raleigh SBDU Team Pro, '78 Trek 930, '81 Holdsworth Special 650B, '86 Masi GC, '87 Panasonic DX5000

Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 433 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 19 Times in 11 Posts
Those are nice bikes. There was one for $100 on the local CL for months, as a ghost ad: no responses.

I've seen a couple of those Suntour Pro drops that were cracked. So make sure the rear drops are aligned, and the hub is spaced correctly for the frame, to minimize stress.
__________________
The man who dies with the most toys…is dead. - Rootboy
jeirvine is offline  
Old 08-13-19, 08:32 AM
  #34  
T-Mar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 17,967
Mentioned: 447 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2528 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 102 Times in 92 Posts
Originally Posted by jdave5917 View Post
Tmar - I am also currently working on a Mark II which I believe to be a 1985, since the Tange fork has an Oct 1985 date code on the steerer, and most other components have mid-1984 date codes. The frame build quality and the paint are both quite impressive. No rust at all at the top tube cable guides which, in my experience, is pretty unusual for 34 year old steel frames. What looks like missing paint on the seatstays in the photo are just reflections from the sun. I was shocked to see Suntour PRO dropouts on both the fork and the frame. As with the others, mine is the metallic red color and has Cyclone M-II derailleurs, Symmetric shifters, and the stylish Sakae crankset. Didn't ride it before disassembly, but I'm expecting it to be equal to or better than the mid-80s Trek 531 bikes and the higher-level, name-brand Japanese bikes of that era. Serial # from the bottom bracket is DZ25462 and the SR Laprade seat post diameter is 27.0 which you mentioned would give up the type of Ishiwata tubing used. Can you tell me which tubeset is on this bike? Also, I'd really appreciate a pdf of the applicable 1985 literature if you could email that to me or provide a link. Thanks.
The serial number indicates it was manufactured by Maruishi in the last fortnight of 1984, which is appropriate for a 1985 model. However, a fork date code of October 1985 is a big time difference and would be consistent with a 1986 model. Still we know the Mk II was replaced with a Mk III for the 1986 model year, so yours should be a 1985 model, possibly with a replacement fork.

As I previously stated, the Nashbar literature does not identify the Ishiwata tubeset but a 27.0mm post would be typical for Ishiwata 024.

Sorry but my 3 in 1 printer died a couple of months ago and a replacement is not in the current budget. I'll try and remember to get a scan the next time I'm at the library.
T-Mar is offline  
Old 08-14-19, 12:37 PM
  #35  
jdave5917
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 47
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
The serial number indicates it was manufactured by Maruishi in the last fortnight of 1984, which is appropriate for a 1985 model. However, a fork date code of October 1985 is a big time difference and would be consistent with a 1986 model. Still we know the Mk II was replaced with a Mk III for the 1986 model year, so yours should be a 1985 model, possibly with a replacement fork.

As I previously stated, the Nashbar literature does not identify the Ishiwata tubeset but a 27.0mm post would be typical for Ishiwata 024.

Sorry but my 3 in 1 printer died a couple of months ago and a replacement is not in the current budget. I'll try and remember to get a scan the next time I'm at the library.
Sorry - fork date code is for Oct 1984 rather than '85 as I misstated above, so that tidies things up. Thx for all the info and that would be great if you can get a scan of the Nashbar literature when you get a chance.

I had weighed the frame with only the headset cups and front derailleur mount attached and came up with 4 lb 13 oz or 2182 grams which would be more consistent with 022 tubing, but the variance could easily be due to scale accuracy. I'll trust your call on that matter.
jdave5917 is offline  
Old 08-14-19, 12:52 PM
  #36  
scarlson
Senior Member
 
scarlson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Medford MA
Posts: 188

Bikes: Ron Cooper touring, 1959 Jack Taylor 650b super touring tandem, Vitus 979, Joe Bell painted Claud Butler Dalesman, Colin Laing curved tube tandem

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 61 Post(s)
Liked 48 Times in 32 Posts
Ah Cyclone M2, so underrated!! I put this on my Vitus 979 as part of a weight weenie build. It's lighter than most of the carbon stuff out there today! That rear mech is only 20g heavier than the stupid-light Huret Jubilee, but will happily shift an 11-28 9-speed in my hands. Understated mechanical beauty.
scarlson is offline  
Old 08-16-19, 12:36 PM
  #37  
Fathom_Labs
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I was watching that one on eBay, beautiful bike, but too small for me!

I've been on the hunt for another 58cm for the last 5 years since mine got totaled (folded back the head tube, snapped the forks, tacoed the wheel, broke the bars, collapsed the chain stay) by a careless Nissan Leaf driver.

Other than the size mine was exactly the same, Road MKIII, beautiful red, amazing ride... I've been riding a Cannondale since and it's just not the same :/ someday I hope to find another!
Fathom_Labs is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
delbiker1
Classic & Vintage
6
04-28-19 07:37 PM
s0ul_chicken
Mountain Biking
3
05-25-16 04:05 PM
Yankeetowner
Fifty Plus (50+)
11
12-30-13 02:26 PM
WillynHook
Utility Cycling
4
10-11-10 07:46 AM
Powderman
Introductions
1
05-07-09 04:46 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.