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Glenwood Barn Find

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Glenwood Barn Find

Old 01-11-20, 10:01 PM
  #101  
OldsCOOL
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Originally Posted by sykerocker View Post
Am also absolutely entranced by this entire thread. What you're doing is where I hope to be in the next year or two, once the shop's done.
I wish you well! This project caught me totally by surprise as everything just fell into place for it to find itís way in my shop. And as you, my era of collectibles are a bit newer than this.
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Old 01-11-20, 11:23 PM
  #102  
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Originally Posted by OldsCOOL View Post
Rock solid.
Thats pretty amazing really. When the wheel is laced and the spokes are tensioned that finger joint is pulled together by the tension of the wheel which helps it stay put for sure, the front wheel had 2 broken spokes when you got it, so the wheel was not fully tensioned, but any remaining tension on the spokes was helpful to keep that finger joint tight over the years, but 120 plus year, stored "outside" for how many of those years, thats impressive workmanship!
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Old 01-12-20, 07:59 AM
  #103  
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Originally Posted by OldsCOOL View Post
The nipples are about 3/4Ē steel and spokes are in SAE length. There appears to be an inset washer to seat the nipple on to protect the wood from giving way.
Inset washer makes this sound like a top quality rim. Washers are a tiny detail taken for granted until faced with a task like this. My 1930s Torrington nipples have a much narrower head than current nipples, finding washers that do the trick is a challenge.
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Old 01-12-20, 08:26 AM
  #104  
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I'm blown away by the condition of the old rims! How about the hubs? I scrolled through and didn't see much about them.
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Old 01-12-20, 08:27 AM
  #105  
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Originally Posted by 63rickert View Post
finding washers that do the trick is a challenge.
There are several types available at the link below, but I also have no idea what a wood rim nipple washer looks like!

https://www.wheelbuildingparts.com/p.../niplewashers/
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Old 01-12-20, 09:20 AM
  #106  
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Originally Posted by GrainBrain View Post
I'm blown away by the condition of the old rims! How about the hubs? I scrolled through and didn't see much about them.
Front hub bearings are (as the other sets) were surprisingly clean and cones adjusted well. The rear is almost dry. Will be posting later. Thx!
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Old 01-12-20, 09:42 AM
  #107  
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Congrats, that bike is crusty in a good way and absolutely beautiful.

Originally Posted by OldsCOOL View Post
So my wife and a very special friend arranged to have this bike under the tree for me tonight. I am still in a state of shock. I had all but written off the thought of getting this bike.

Fully intact, true barn find, 1898 Glenwood.



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Old 01-12-20, 09:45 AM
  #108  
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Woah! Sweet!
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Old 01-12-20, 10:59 AM
  #109  
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Originally Posted by jackbombay View Post
There are several types available at the link below, but I also have no idea what a wood rim nipple washer looks like!

https://www.wheelbuildingparts.com/p.../niplewashers/
The Sapim washers are good. Different enough from hardware store washers it would be worth the ticket. For the oval cupped variety I have a small stock of 1940s Raleigh washers that are just about same. For the small brass washers shown at link there is no point. Hardware washers are same and cheap in bulk. Which brings up another point. Current production spokes have longer elbows than old ones. A washer between spoke and hub flange may be required. But it varies. Some old hubs have thick chunky flanges even in steel. For Sturmey or steel FB definitely washers required.
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Old 01-12-20, 01:25 PM
  #110  
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Originally Posted by 63rickert View Post
Current production spokes have longer elbows than old ones. A washer between spoke and hub flange may be required. But it varies. Some old hubs have thick chunky flanges even in steel. For Sturmey or steel FB definitely washers required.
I always build my sturmey wheels with washers on the elbows of the spokes!
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Old 01-12-20, 01:40 PM
  #111  
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Originally Posted by 63rickert View Post
The Sapim washers are good. Different enough from hardware store washers it would be worth the ticket. For the oval cupped variety I have a small stock of 1940s Raleigh washers that are just about same. For the small brass washers shown at link there is no point. Hardware washers are same and cheap in bulk. Which brings up another point. Current production spokes have longer elbows than old ones. A washer between spoke and hub flange may be required. But it varies. Some old hubs have thick chunky flanges even in steel. For Sturmey or steel FB definitely washers required.
Originally Posted by jackbombay View Post
I always build my sturmey wheels with washers on the elbows of the spokes!
I will definately be be advised on that situation!
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Old 01-12-20, 04:04 PM
  #112  
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Originally Posted by GrainBrain View Post
I'm blown away by the condition of the old rims! How about the hubs? I scrolled through and didn't see much about them.
Here is what the rear hub looks like. Bearing races are dry and without any residual grease or evidence of being serviced. I may be the first one touching this since the factory assembly workers.


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Old 01-12-20, 04:32 PM
  #113  
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Is that ^^^^^^ the coaster brake mechanism, inside the hub?
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Old 01-12-20, 07:52 PM
  #114  
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Originally Posted by madpogue View Post
Is that ^^^^^^ the coaster brake mechanism, inside the hub?
Sure is.
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Old 01-21-20, 05:58 PM
  #115  
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Next stage in this project is lacing up with spokes/nipples. First, I ordered a set of cheapy 14ga spokes with just a guess on length, knowing they would be too long but would only serve the purpose of my practice and splash at relacing, this being my first. Next, I could measure for proper length on spoke and nipple before the order.

The rear 36h would be laced in a cross-3 pattern (over, over, under). Front is a 32h cross-2 (over, under). Both laced up nicely in that pattern. I really like the x2 pattern on the front that gives a star-like appearance.

Here is the front mock-up:


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Old 01-21-20, 06:53 PM
  #116  
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Originally Posted by OldsCOOL View Post
First, I ordered a set of cheapy 14ga spokes with just a guess on length
If you measure the diameter of the rim in 2 or 3 places and average your measurements you should be able to get an ERD that is within a millimeter, the hub dimensions are easy to measure, those numbers can then go right into any spoke length calculator.
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Old 01-21-20, 09:10 PM
  #117  
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Loving this thread. Thank you!

Any markings on the hub shells?
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Old 01-21-20, 09:15 PM
  #118  
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Originally Posted by Roll-Monroe-Co View Post
Loving this thread. Thank you!

Any markings on the hub shells?
Only the rear coaster hub, marked ďAthertonĒ patent 1907. From my research it shows to be one of the earlier coaster hubs. There is no anchor lever, it anchors in the dropout via index blocks. This was an intriguing era to bicycle history.

Front hub has no markings.
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Old 01-22-20, 06:46 AM
  #119  
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Subscribed. This is really beyond any of my dreams. Exciting!
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Old 01-22-20, 07:52 AM
  #120  
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Originally Posted by 63rickert View Post
Inset washer makes this sound like a top quality rim. Washers are a tiny detail taken for granted until faced with a task like this. My 1930s Torrington nipples have a much narrower head than current nipples, finding washers that do the trick is a challenge.
You probably know but AN washers- usually harder to find are sometimes useful - smaller hole- better plating and more uniform thickness.

also metric washers- slightly different dimensions and of AN quality.
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Old 01-22-20, 09:54 AM
  #121  
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Originally Posted by jackbombay View Post
If you measure the diameter of the rim in 2 or 3 places and average your measurements you should be able to get an ERD that is within a millimeter, the hub dimensions are easy to measure, those numbers can then go right into any spoke length calculator.
Yes, spoke calculators are handy but with a thick wooden rim itís a bit more complicated. Iíll go local, buying single spokes until it fits. What also complicates things is the nipple must be a minimum of 3/4Ē or 19mm which is todays maximum and not available most places (though few offer them). Also, spoke thread lengths 122 years ago were far more generous in length than today.
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Old 01-22-20, 10:17 AM
  #122  
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Originally Posted by OldsCOOL View Post
Also, spoke thread lengths 122 years ago were far more generous in length than today.
I think you can add all the threads you need to spokes with a hozan thread roller, I have not used one though, but there are videos on youtube which show how they work. Not cheap though.

https://www.ebay.com/p/6023224782?iid=153695461579&chn=ps&norover=1&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-117182-37290-0&mkcid=2&itemid=153695461579&targetid=856357246536&device=c&mktype=pla&googleloc=9029488&poi=&campa ignid=6470552628&mkgroupid=89345499032&rlsatarget=aud-622524040998la-856357246536&abcId=1139336&merchantid=113577010&gclid=CjwKCAiAgqDxBRBTEiwA59eEN3N3ZNedMF3vQdv7ByoLuH YzSOJpv5wwO5gzDpNkjoaBkhxKbAoyAhoCb_EQAvD_BwE
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Old 01-22-20, 10:46 AM
  #123  
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Thank you. Pretty sure my die set doesnít go that small.
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Old 01-22-20, 11:03 AM
  #124  
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Originally Posted by OldsCOOL View Post
Thank you. Pretty sure my die set doesnít go that small.
This rolls the threads which is much better than cutting them!
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Old 01-22-20, 08:03 PM
  #125  
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Love the wheels OldsCOOL! Keep the pics coming!

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