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Velocity Twin Hollow?

Old 08-09-19, 04:51 AM
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Velocity Twin Hollow?

I just picked up a NOS set of 700cx36 made in Australia Velocity Twin Hollow rims. They had a little handwritten note taped to them that said "Similar to Weinmann concave"

They dont look as solid as the Weinmanns, so I was wondering how these would hold up to a Clydesdale gone touring?
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Old 08-09-19, 05:40 AM
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Originally Posted by bark_eater
I just picked up a NOS set of 700cx36 made in Australia Velocity Twin Hollow rims. They had a little handwritten note taped to them that said "Similar to Weinmann concave"

They dont look as solid as the Weinmanns, so I was wondering how these would hold up to a Clydesdale gone touring?
As I recall, these are single-wall rims, but really sturdy and made from a thicker gauge of aluminum.

The "twin hollow" design is an improvement on the old, rolled corner support of most single-walled rims. For most applications, I'd say they're OK.

However, since you threw "touring" into the mix, I'm going to say you'd be better off with dual-walled rims with eyelets - just in case. Personally, I wouldn't take the risk that I'd get (possibly) stranded over a cracked spoke hole or bent rim from a bad bump (or a nasty fall caused by a hidden bump).

-Kurt
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Old 08-09-19, 06:28 AM
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Agreed. I built a bunch of wheels using those rims and while they make up nice and round, would not recommend them for a heavy rider or loaded touring.
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Old 08-09-19, 07:09 AM
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So lets say I was going to treat them a bit gingerly and leave the luggage at home, what sort of spokes would be appropriate? Straight Gauge or Double Butted? I was thinking Straight Gauge as this will be my first complete wheel, but Double Butted might protect the rim a bit more.
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Old 08-09-19, 08:02 AM
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The Velocity Atlas rims we have on our tandem and I have on my big tire 32mm (to me) bike are bomb proof rims. They have carried in excess of 400 lbs on the tandem so doubt they would have any problem on a loaded tourer, but do get the right spoke count, more better, and best spokes you can. This would be a wheel build with peace of mind, neither set have needed truing in years of use.
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Old 08-09-19, 08:58 AM
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Originally Posted by bark_eater
So lets say I was going to treat them a bit gingerly and leave the luggage at home, what sort of spokes would be appropriate? Straight Gauge or Double Butted? I was thinking Straight Gauge as this will be my first complete wheel, but Double Butted might protect the rim a bit more.
If you're going to the effort of building up wheels, I say use double-butted. The common 2.0/1.8/2.0 spokes don't twist as much as the skinnier ones do.
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Old 08-10-19, 02:13 AM
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I've seen some suggestions to use straight gauge spokes for the drive side. I'm still not clear on the how the "forces" work if the rim is considered the weakest link.
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Old 08-10-19, 07:14 AM
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Originally Posted by bark_eater
So lets say I was going to treat them a bit gingerly and leave the luggage at home, what sort of spokes would be appropriate? Straight Gauge or Double Butted? I was thinking Straight Gauge as this will be my first complete wheel, but Double Butted might protect the rim a bit more.
Still the wrong rims.

Double butted would be preferable. Perhaps one gauge size down (thicker) if you don't mind the extra weight, but still stick with DB'ing.

-Kurt
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Old 08-10-19, 10:10 AM
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I really like triple butted spokes. I don't know the measurements in millimeters, but 13/15/14ga is what I use. That way the holes in the hub are fully filled and the shaft is nice and thin. Used to be you could only get these from DT (Alpine 3) but now Sapim makes them as well (Sapim Strong [edit] Force). Unless you're trying to shave off grams, I see no reason not to use them, as they don't cost any more than double-butted and I won't build wheels with straight gauge spokes.

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Old 08-10-19, 03:40 PM
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Originally Posted by bark_eater
I've seen some suggestions to use straight gauge spokes for the drive side. I'm still not clear on the how the "forces" work if the rim is considered the weakest link.
That seems like a bad idea, too. The drive-side spokes are under the highest tension. Straight-gauge spokes don't stretch as much, so their tension rises and falls more with each cycle than DB spokes, and this "works" the rim harder.
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Old 08-11-19, 07:55 AM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott
That seems like a bad idea, too. The drive-side spokes are under the highest tension. Straight-gauge spokes don't stretch as much, so their tension rises and falls more with each cycle than DB spokes, and this "works" the rim harder.
It's not necessarily a bad idea to use stiffer spokes, especially when the rim is single-walled and thus vulnerable to instability under side loads.

Single-walled rims tend to more often fail from being potato-chipped (when opposing quadrants move to one side, with the remaining two quadrants moving to the other side, thus completely de-tensioning the wheel).
Stiffer spokes and higher spoke counts raise the rim's resistance to such instability, and the drive-side spokes see the highest levels of cyclic stress.

Double-walled rims have much greater stiffness, especially in twisting (which is what occurs when a rim potatoe-chips). So they can use lower spoke counts and lighter-gage spokes. Their thinner-walled construction and lower spoke counts combined may favor the use of thinner spokes to reduce the likelihood of cracking at the spoke holes.
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Old 08-11-19, 11:10 AM
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So that's a definite maybe?
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Old 08-11-19, 09:21 PM
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Originally Posted by rccardr
Agreed. I built a bunch of wheels using those rims and while they make up nice and round, would not recommend them for a heavy rider or loaded touring.
Thanks for the heads up! I bought a pair of them from you a year or two ago (cheap!)

Youíll see them at Cino in a couple weeks, on my Nishiki gravel grinder. Donít worry, they are well protected by 38mm skins.

FWIW, I weigh 200 lbs and Iíve bashed those rims pretty severely around some local single track and they are still true.

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