Bike Forums

Bike Forums (https://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Classic & Vintage (https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/)
-   -   C&V Loaded Tour (1,300km) Suggestions..... (https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/1181061-c-v-loaded-tour-1-300km-suggestions.html)

RamAlaRag 08-15-19 01:41 PM


Originally Posted by Salamandrine (Post 21076974)
https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...nversions.html

What is required depends on what you start with. It can be as simple as putting on some long reach brakes and building up a new set of 650B wheels. The smaller wheels/rims mean that there is going to be more room for a fatter tire, without really needing to modify the frame. It is going to be easiest if you start with a bike that doesn't have cantilever studs already, since they would need to move down by 19-23mm to fit the smaller wheels.

A lot of people will bend more rake into the fork to reduce the amount of trail. This is supposed to improve handling with a front load, especially at lower speeds.

Thanks for this, I'll do more reading after work!

conspiratemus1 08-15-19 01:59 PM


Originally Posted by RamAlaRag (Post 21077133)
... I look forward to the challenge, landscape, and unique characteristics of the region. ...

You'll love it then. That's certainly the right spirit. It is a wonderful place.

RamAlaRag 08-15-19 02:59 PM


Originally Posted by conspiratemus1 (Post 21077162)
You'll love it then. That's certainly the right spirit. It is a wonderful place.

Thank you! I certainly hope so. Frame first 😉

RamAlaRag 08-16-19 06:32 PM

I ran across this Lotus, it's got a unique frame and a cool style to it. It's in better shape than I was looking for (I was prepared for a restoration), but being an MTB clearance is great to start. With a drop conversion it would be cool. 30" standover sounds about right. I'm a 52-54cm. He says '48cm tubing,' but 30" standover? What do y'all think?

https://portland.craigslist.org/clc/...935497025.html

AeroGut 08-16-19 06:43 PM

The top tube looks quite long, as was common on MTBs of that era, and the seat tube angle is pretty slack. That means the reach might be pretty long once you put a drop bar on it. With a compact drop bar and short stem, you can shorten the reach quite a bit, but worth doing some measurements before you buy.
Otherwise, looks like a great find.

RamAlaRag 08-16-19 06:58 PM


Originally Posted by AeroGut (Post 21079026)
The top tube looks quite long, as was common on MTBs of that era, and the seat tube angle is pretty slack. That means the reach might be pretty long once you put a drop bar on it. With a compact drop bar and short stem, you can shorten the reach quite a bit, but worth doing some measurements before you buy.
Otherwise, looks like a great find.

Thanks for this. I'll ask the seller for a few measurements. It being a smaller frame than my usual concerns me, although I realize MTBs are sized differently...

Cycle Tourist 08-16-19 07:11 PM


Originally Posted by RamAlaRag (Post 21074221)
Hi all,

If all goes to plan correctly, and I am granted funding for a college thesis project (I am already partially funded), I will be spending some time in Iceland next summer, and the following two summers. My dream has been to ride the ring road, and have planned a tour of it before. I have planned long tours elsewhere before, but finally I realistically see this plan coming to fruition!

My hope was to build up a frame between now and then to use on the tour. I like the idea of touring on a C&V frame, and welcome all suggestions. Yes, I have done some forum searching and yielded Trek 720, Miyata 1000, and Centurion Pro Tour ideas, but that's all I know....

Everything from groupset to frame advice is welcome. My main concerns are reliability and ability to take weight, but I tend to put weight on front panniers. I hike long distance 'ultralight', so my gear is minimal and fits in a 40L hiking pack.

Thanks so much!

-G

I'm partial to the Miyata. Be sure to load the bike like you'll have it loaded and take a day in all conditions before setting out. I had a big frame 720 and was shocked to find it so flexible when loaded. (The smaller frames are supposed to be stiffer) Other than getting the lowest gearing you'll ever going to need you can't go wrong with the classics.😁

Cycle Tourist 08-16-19 07:17 PM


Originally Posted by RamAlaRag (Post 21074357)
I had never even heard of these, I'll keep my eyes open and dig into them a bit more, thanks!

I'm a big fan of the Cannondale touring bikes. All the "T" 'dales would be great. Are the roads paved or dirt. A Mt. bike may be a good thought.

Hobbiano 08-16-19 07:40 PM

Thats a nice vintage mountain bike, if a bit overpriced. imo. I think it would be great for riding non technical trails, gravel, fire roads etc. Some of those Suntour Mountech rear derailleurs were famous for exploding and taking the rear wheel with it. But it seems to me, if you want to put drop bars on it, you'd be better off just starting with a touring bike with decent tire clearance. Vintage or a little newer, with index shifting, better brakes and proper frame geometry for touring.
Most mountain bike drop bar conversions that I've seen have too long of a top tube and too low of a head tube to get the bars in a good position without getting a really tall stem with really short extension, and consider the added expense of drop bars, shifters, brake levers, stem. And if you get a taller frame to help get the bars up the top tube will be even longer. I know people have done this, and have been happy with the results, but for touring I think you'll want the bars about level with the saddle or even higher, with a reasonable length stem and a top tube about the same length as the seat tube, more or less. So I know some will disagree, but this is just an opinion.

Salamandrine 08-16-19 08:44 PM

That Lotus is pretty cool for sure. Pretty rare too. Since it sounds like you're going to be riding some substantial gravel out of necessity, an 80's MTB may be the best way to go. Neat that it just new enough to have lowrider brazeons.

Sizing of MTB's is totally different than road bikes. I usually figure roughly 5cm less than your road size is ballpark.

AFA the cost, the way I see it is that a mountain bike of this vintage is basically a frame, a crankset, and maybe a few other odd parts you can use. I'd be inclined to strip it down to the bare frame and rebuild it to suit your needs. Some things that seemed like a good idea at the time really were not. Like solid axle hubs. Get rid of those. You don't want to have to get out a wrench if you have a flat. Cheap way to go would be to swap out the axles. I'd build up a new set of wheels myself, maybe keeping the probably 130(?) spacing.

RamAlaRag 08-16-19 09:11 PM


Originally Posted by Cycle Tourist (Post 21079058)
I'm partial to the Miyata. Be sure to load the bike like you'll have it loaded and take a day in all conditions before setting out. I had a big frame 720 and was shocked to find it so flexible when loaded. (The smaller frames are supposed to be stiffer) Other than getting the lowest gearing you'll ever going to need you can't go wrong with the classics.😁

Thanks! I'll definitely keep an eye out for a Miyata. :)

RamAlaRag 08-16-19 09:18 PM


Originally Posted by Cycle Tourist (Post 21079061)
I'm a big fan of the Cannondale touring bikes. All the "T" 'dales would be great. Are the roads paved or dirt. A Mt. bike may be a good thought.

Definitely a mixed surface tour!

RamAlaRag 08-16-19 09:22 PM


Originally Posted by Hobbiano (Post 21079087)
Thats a nice vintage mountain bike, if a bit overpriced. imo. I think it would be great for riding non technical trails, gravel, fire roads etc. Some of those Suntour Mountech rear derailleurs were famous for exploding and taking the rear wheel with it. But it seems to me, if you want to put drop bars on it, you'd be better off just starting with a touring bike with decent tire clearance. Vintage or a little newer, with index shifting, better brakes and proper frame geometry for touring.
Most mountain bike drop bar conversions that I've seen have too long of a top tube and too low of a head tube to get the bars in a good position without getting a really tall stem with really short extension, and consider the added expense of drop bars, shifters, brake levers, stem. And if you get a taller frame to help get the bars up the top tube will be even longer. I know people have done this, and have been happy with the results, but for touring I think you'll want the bars about level with the saddle or even higher, with a reasonable length stem and a top tube about the same length as the seat tube, more or less. So I know some will disagree, but this is just an opinion.

It does seem overpriced to me, too. I really don't know enough to determine comfort long distance on a MTB to drop converted frame, so it's hard to say the personal opinion on that. I am partial to road bike frames over MTB's usually, mostly out of aesthetics. I'll have to do more figuring on it. It's definitely a concern. I appreciate your input!

RamAlaRag 08-16-19 09:25 PM


Originally Posted by Salamandrine (Post 21079152)
That Lotus is pretty cool for sure. Pretty rare too. Since it sounds like you're going to be riding some substantial gravel out of necessity, an 80's MTB may be the best way to go. Neat that it just new enough to have lowrider brazeons.

Sizing of MTB's is totally different than road bikes. I usually figure roughly 5cm less than your road size is ballpark.

AFA the cost, the way I see it is that a mountain bike of this vintage is basically a frame, a crankset, and maybe a few other odd parts you can use. I'd be inclined to strip it down to the bare frame and rebuild it to suit your needs. Some things that seemed like a good idea at the time really were not. Like solid axle hubs. Get rid of those. You don't want to have to get out a wrench if you have a flat. Cheap way to go would be to swap out the axles. I'd build up a new set of wheels myself, maybe keeping the probably 130(?) spacing.

Thanks for chiming in on this!

Nice, if the sizing is a good ballpark, that puts it right in the sweet spot for me.

Most definitely a rebuild I would expect, plus it would just be fun to rebuild it to suit the needs of the tour.... ;)

I appreciate your response! I'm talking to the seller now about geometry.

RamAlaRag 08-16-19 10:32 PM

OK, so, the seller says the TT on the Pegasus is 22.5 inches, I'm not sure how he accurate he measured, but the effective TT on my 52cm San Jose is 21.14", it feels a tad cramped when reaching. But overall OK. I know touring bikes tend to have longer TT's, and as mentioned earlier, same with this era MTB. Do you think I'll notice this extra inch or so negatively? If by changing seat post and stem/bars can I work this reach down, or would it just increase.. (assuming the saddle/bars are level, I could raise the bars via stem). I know VeloOrange has some back angled stems that could help...?
The seller was quick to mention the saddle has fore/aft adjustments in two places ;)

Anyway, just thinking out loud, I would just go ride the bike and see how it feels but it's 6+ hours, I do have a friend in PDX who would pick it up for me, if needed.

Hobbiano 08-17-19 09:49 AM

Maybe spend some time here: https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...nversions.html

Then look here: https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...ing-bikes.html

Compare the geometry. Lots of discussion on how to make a vintage mountain bike work with drop bars. It's not always easy.
Too long in the top tube, too small of a frame to try to get by with a not too ridiculous looking stem, and too much seat post with generally too low bars.
Again, just my observations, not trying too tick anyone off. Also a high bottom bracket. Maybe a hybrid would be a better conversion.
Note however, my comments apply to conversions with drop bars only. Good threads to check out anyway.

RamAlaRag 08-17-19 10:54 AM


Originally Posted by Hobbiano (Post 21079599)
Maybe spend some time here: https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...nversions.html

Then look here: https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...ing-bikes.html

Compare the geometry. Lots of discussion on how to make a vintage mountain bike work with drop bars. It's not always easy.
Too long in the top tube, too small of a frame to try to get by with a not too ridiculous looking stem, and too much seat post with generally too low bars.
Again, just my observations, not trying too tick anyone off. Also a high bottom bracket. Maybe a hybrid would be a better conversion.
Note however, my comments apply to conversions with drop bars only. Good threads to check out anyway.

Thanks Habbiano, I have been perusing the drop conversion thread quite a bit. I definitely see the difference(s) in geometry, and likely comfort over the long haul. The big plus doing the MTB drop is the ability to take larger tires for Icelandic roads. Of course, if it doesn't fit well, it doesn't fit well and its a moot point. I could see myself doing a Schwinn Voyageur or Raleigh Portage (if you could find one under $1,400. There are a few Schwinn Voyageurs in PDX for around $400, a little too high for me as I am looking mostly for a frame. But I understand the Voyageurs can take large tires readily.... It's a hard decision! I wish I had more experience.

If the Pegasus was about $200 cheaper I wouldn't hesitate to take the chance.

RamAlaRag 08-17-19 11:11 AM

You know, I could do trekking bars or VeloO's 'Crazy Bars,' it would offer multiple hand positions and maintain a similar reach to stock, but give you the ability to stretch out. Hmm...

Okay, okay! Enough bugging y'all! Haha.

RamAlaRag 09-02-19 10:00 AM

Hey y'all!

So here's what I picked up last night..... Both will be taken down to frame, cleaned, and reassessed. I think the 1000 should be repainted/restored. The TerraRunner will get touch up on the rear left stay.. but other than that the paint is good.

I'd like to keep the 1000 mostly original, but the TerraRunner will see some major changes to suit it to the tour. https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...e0071a0a4f.jpghttps://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...b5054f6465.jpg


I guess we'll see which fits and feels best for Iceland... 😉

ryansu 09-02-19 11:13 AM

Nice Scores OP! Have fun with the refurbs

BikeWonder 09-02-19 11:15 AM


Originally Posted by RamAlaRag (Post 21103951)
Hey y'all!

So here's what I picked up last night..... Both will be taken down to frame, cleaned, and reassessed. I think the 1000 should be repainted/restored. The TerraRunner will get touch up on the rear left stay.. but other than that the paint is good.

I'd like to keep the 1000 mostly original, but the TerraRunner will see some major changes to suit it to the tour. https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...e0071a0a4f.jpghttps://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...b5054f6465.jpg


I guess we'll see which fits and feels best for Iceland... 😉

I wouldn't repaint the 1000. Just fix what you have to and give it a damn nice polish it deserves.

For Iceland, I would probably use something more upright and rigid wheels for any offroad, so the latter bike would do just fine.

RamAlaRag 09-02-19 11:18 AM


Originally Posted by BikeWonder (Post 21104045)
I wouldn't repaint the 1000. Just fix what you have to and give it a damn nice polish it deserves.

For Iceland, I would probably use something more upright and rigid wheels for any offroad, so the latter bike would do just fine.

Yeah, that's how I felt at first about paint, but upon further inspection there is bare metal with nail varnish on it all over... unless it's way too expensive, it couldbe nice to give it a fresh coat with new decals.

gugie 09-02-19 11:50 AM


Originally Posted by RamAlaRag (Post 21104049)
...unless it's way too expensive, it couldbe nice to give it a fresh coat with new decals.

Powder coat is the way to go. A good catalyst paint job will cost more than what you paid for the bike in the first place. Powder coat is a lot more durable, just make sure you get it done somewhere that does lots of bicycles.

RamAlaRag 09-02-19 12:15 PM


Originally Posted by gugie (Post 21104089)
Powder coat is the way to go. A good catalyst paint job will cost more than what you paid for the bike in the first place. Powder coat is a lot more durable, just make sure you get it done somewhere that does lots of bicycles.

Great! Powder coat was my hope. I'll be looking for a good shop in Olympia/Tacoma/Portland.

Salamandrine 09-02-19 02:09 PM

Well that's a score. One of each. :thumb: I kind of think either one would work if outfitted properly. You'll now have a chance to do some test runs on local roads, and decide what you prefer.

A regular touring bike like the 1000 most certainly can be ridden on gravel, but it does take a bit more concentration. I bet with no fenders 35 or 38c will fit on there, which will make it easier. With the MTB, I'm sure 50+ would be no problem. Nice thing about fat MTBish tires is that if you're really tired or bonked, it's much easier and less fatiguing to ride on gravel roads. There's no need to worry about your lines all the time. Downside is that it is heavier and a bit slower.

The thing about early MTBs is that everyone was making it up as they went along. They were usually kind of overbuilt. For touring, I'd suggest putting the TerraRunner on a diet: new wheels with QR axles and probably lighter rims, light and fat tires--non knobbie, lose the QR seat post binder, and go to a regular quill MTB stem. Motorcycle style brake levers are a little ridicuous too, but kind of fun.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:34 AM.


Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.