Bike Forums

Bike Forums (https://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Classic & Vintage (https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/)
-   -   C&V Loaded Tour (1,300km) Suggestions..... (https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/1181061-c-v-loaded-tour-1-300km-suggestions.html)

RamAlaRag 08-13-19 06:01 PM

C&V Loaded Tour (1,300km) Suggestions.....
 
Hi all,

If all goes to plan correctly, and I am granted funding for a college thesis project (I am already partially funded), I will be spending some time in Iceland next summer, and the following two summers. My dream has been to ride the ring road, and have planned a tour of it before. I have planned long tours elsewhere before, but finally I realistically see this plan coming to fruition!

My hope was to build up a frame between now and then to use on the tour. I like the idea of touring on a C&V frame, and welcome all suggestions. Yes, I have done some forum searching and yielded Trek 720, Miyata 1000, and Centurion Pro Tour ideas, but that's all I know....

Everything from groupset to frame advice is welcome. My main concerns are reliability and ability to take weight, but I tend to put weight on front panniers. I hike long distance 'ultralight', so my gear is minimal and fits in a 40L hiking pack.

Thanks so much!

-G

mstateglfr 08-13-19 06:46 PM

Never been, much less toured.

A couple active posters have toured the island in the last few years though. @jefnvk @niknak @tourist-in-msn

Pretty sure upright rigid mtb style frames were used for the bike builds. From pics I've seen, a wider tire is better than what traditional drop bar touring bikes can fit.

Posting in the touring forum may get you more hits with experience in that location.
Loaded touring in Iceland /= loaded touring in the midwest USA(for example).

Good luck

clubman 08-13-19 07:04 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Cannondale T1000. Nothing carries weight and remains as stiff as these bikes. Put the load wherever you want. Exceed your load. Whatever.
Denmark for a month, Holland for 2 months, little Belgium and Germany

Salamandrine 08-13-19 07:10 PM

I'm sure all three of those bikes would be excellent choices. All three will do the job happily. You'll need to decide for yourself which you prefer. If you have an ultralight hiker mindset, you'll be alright. Modern touring bikes, ie Surly, are designed for heavyset people who pack everything and the kitchen sink. No reason you really need more than about 20-25# worth of stuff.

Right after high school, BITD, me and my buddy from HS did a tour about twice that long. The bikes employed were one Trek 720, and one Univega Specialissima (mine), which is a Miyata 1000 with different decals. It was a great time, despite the angry skunk incident. So I can personally endorse 2/3 of those choices. Note that a Specialissima should be on your list also, as it is in effect a slighly higher spec Miyata 1000, and they often go under the radar. Even though I worked at the time for a Trek and Univega dealer, and could have got a deal on either, I went with the (Miyata made) Univega over a 720 because it was cheaper and I felt it had a sportier racing bike like ride.

Can't go wrong really. Don't overpack. Try to plan so that you can buy food along the way, understanding that Iceland is relatively sparsely populated. I've never been to Iceland, but from what I know it can be very windy. Don't get one of those stupid ultralight tents (ie Big Agnes fly reek). Stick to the double or triple hoop type.

RamAlaRag 08-13-19 07:24 PM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 21074321)
Cannondale T1000.

I had never even heard of these, I'll keep my eyes open and dig into them a bit more, thanks!

RamAlaRag 08-13-19 07:33 PM


Originally Posted by Salamandrine (Post 21074337)
I'm sure all three of those bikes would be excellent choices. All three will do the job happily....etc

I appreciate this response. I didn't realize the Univega Spec. was so similar to the Miyata 1000, I think I've seen a couple for cheap on the local CL... I'll keep my eyes open and try and ride a few of these options.

How do you feel about components? What did you use on your Uni?

I was hiking the Pacific Crest Trail (did not do the whole thing) earlier this year and tested a few tents in some varying conditions, I definitely agree with you, tent and sleeping bag should not be skimped on, but also there is so much hype for the UL style ones, which are quite shaky in high wind. Haha... all to save a pound or two. My base weight was 16-18lbs without food or water, I carried about 3L of water (filtering throughout the day) and 6 days of food. I would definitely rather buy more food on the road than carry. Oh! But I carried a 35mm film camera and two lenses, so that added many lbs..... I definitely wasn't the lightest on the trail when all the food and such was packed. I'm about 180-190lbs, so all together my tour weight shouldn't be too bad.

Thanks again.

G

Lascauxcaveman 08-13-19 08:00 PM


Originally Posted by RamAlaRag (Post 21074374)
... I definitely wasn't the lightest on the trail when all the food and such was packed. I'm about 180-190lbs, so all together my tour weight shouldn't be too bad.

G

Last time I saw you, you seemed a bit smaller than 180 lbs. All growed up now eh, son? ;) If you've been going on the kind of hikes you've described, I don't think you'll mind too much packing lots more gear on a bike.

I'll chip in in favor of the Cannondales, get a 1991 or earlier ST600 or ST1000 with the steel fork and put the biggest tires you can squeeze in. Here's mine with 35mm tires under fenders:

https://live.staticflickr.com/4329/3...918fc4e6_c.jpg

deux jambes 08-13-19 08:07 PM

You mentioned the Pacific Crest Trail... are you located by chance im the PNW? I see a frame on CL which could make a great foundation for a touring bike build if itís within your size range.

RamAlaRag 08-13-19 08:37 PM


Originally Posted by Lascauxcaveman (Post 21074415)
Last time I saw you, you seemed a bit smaller than 180 lbs. All growed up now eh, son? ;) If you've been going on the kind of hikes you've described, I don't think you'll mind too much packing lots more gear on a bike.

I'll chip in in favor of the Cannondales, get a 1991 or earlier ST600 or ST1000 with the steel fork and put the biggest tires you can squeeze in. Here's mine with 35mm tires under fenders:

https://live.staticflickr.com/4329/3...918fc4e6_c.jpg

Tim!

That's a nice bike! Thanks for the show ;) I appreciate the response.

Also... I've always been this big, haha, unfortunately I'm still on the shorter side. I think you met me at my lightest. I think I was 16 then!

I do expect having some more gear will be a great comfort/luxury... Haha.

Cheers
Garret

niknak 08-13-19 08:38 PM

I rode the Ring Road in 2008. There were a few parts, mainly in the east, that weren't paved. The dirt roads were in good shape. Since the riding is mainly on the coast, there are very few extended climbs. The riding was actually easy. But when the wind didn't cooperate, that was a different story.

The bike I took was a classic road touring bike with canti brakes, down tube shifters, and 700x35 tires.

If you're packing light, then what bike you use won't matter too much. I'd opt for the widest tires your frame can fit. And bring a four season tent. The wind doesn't play games there.

RamAlaRag 08-13-19 08:39 PM


Originally Posted by deux jambes (Post 21074428)
You mentioned the Pacific Crest Trail... are you located by chance im the PNW? I see a frame on CL which could make a great foundation for a touring bike build if itís within your size range.

Was previously in the Port Townsend WA area, but Olympia is my second 'home,' I live in Moscow, Idaho for school. Where is the frame? For geometry ideas my Merckx is 54cm and my Bianchi is 52cm... which feels slightly small, although it is a CX frame. I have a 30" inseam.

RamAlaRag 08-13-19 08:41 PM


Originally Posted by niknak (Post 21074473)
I rode the Ring Road in 2008...

Ah! I appreciate this a lot. Thank you.

RamAlaRag 08-13-19 08:42 PM


Originally Posted by mstateglfr (Post 21074289)
Never been, much less toured.

A couple active posters have toured the island in the last few years though. @jefnvk @niknak @tourist-in-msn Good luck

Thanks!

jefnvk 08-13-19 08:43 PM

Not sure if the Ring Road is fully paved yet. The paved parts can be done on any bike, although I'd suggest alternative routes in and out of Reykjavik. The Icelandic tourism office prints free cyclist maps with suggestions. There are a few cycle paths leaving the city, and alternate roads suggested to the north and south once you leave those. The highway from the airport is mostly flat with a wide shoulder, easy to ride.

As far as the bike, you're gonna want wide gearing. I'd also suggest sticking with frames that can accept "modern" components. Not a lot of bike shops or assistance out there, and any old parts will be impossible to source.

I'd stick to wider tires for the non paved main roads. If I were going again, I'd probably take my Mazama with 40mm tires. If you plan on any F-roads, plan on MTB or fat bike.

Any specific questions, just quote or tag me so it hits my email, got busy this summer and haven't had the chance to hang out here as much!

Lascauxcaveman 08-13-19 08:45 PM


Originally Posted by niknak (Post 21074473)
I rode the Ring Road in 2008. There were a few parts, mainly in the east, that weren't paved. The dirt roads were in good shape. Since the riding is mainly on the coast, there are very few extended climbs. The riding was actually easy. But when the wind didn't cooperate, that was a different story.

The bike I took was a classic road touring bike with canti brakes, down tube shifters, and 700x35 tires.

If you're packing light, then what bike you use won't matter too much. I'd opt for the widest tires your frame can fit. And bring a four season tent. The wind doesn't play games there.

I guess I better add this one to the bucket list - Iceland! I haven't even considered that one yet!

Right after John O' Groats to Land's End, after Ireland, after France, after Italy, Croatia... :lol:

deux jambes 08-13-19 09:00 PM


Originally Posted by RamAlaRag (Post 21074476)
Was previously in the Port Townsend WA area, but Olympia is my second 'home,' I live in Moscow, Idaho for school. Where is the frame? For geometry ideas my Merckx is 54cm and my Bianchi is 52cm... which feels slightly small, although it is a CX frame. I have a 30" inseam.

Ah... the frame is to big then. The seller has it listed as 57.5 c-t

Regardless, you might want to take a peek at it not to buy it it of course, but to see what an 80ís Novara Randonee might offer you as yet an option to your quest for a frame.

Portland CL

https://portland.craigslist.org/mlt/...954124670.html

Salamandrine 08-13-19 09:14 PM


Originally Posted by RamAlaRag (Post 21074374)

How do you feel about components? What did you use on your Uni?



The importance of components is to some degree over rated. I do think reliability is good. The frame matters. Wheels and tires matter. Other than that, the parts won't make much difference as long as you stick to reasonable quality and set it up properly. No fun if stuff breaks. I would recommend 36h wheels, but nothing too heavy is required IME. Nice to have the resiliency to be able to lose a spoke. Get good tires and a comfortable seat. Pick what you like or better yet buy a fully set up bike and fix it up as necessary.


I suggest SPD rather than vintage pedals. They are just better. Also, I'd probably go with aero levers. If only because it makes it easy to work on your bike upside down in camp if you need to.


In modern speak, my old Univega was a frankenbike. I bought a frame and then built it up with stuff from my junk box plus what could buy for a good deal. Ended up with lots of then out of fashion bike boom parts. Lemme see, Cinelli bar and stem, Avocet cranks, Suntour derailleurs and shifters, Mafac canti brakes, Lyotard 23 pedals, Zeus seatpost and a Turbo seat IIRC. I dutifully built up some 27 x 1 1/4 clinchers as was the practice of the time, Super champ 58 I think. Never used them though, since I decided that my training tubulars were strong enough, and would roll faster. I hated clinchers...

RamAlaRag 08-13-19 09:43 PM


Originally Posted by jefnvk (Post 21074481)
Not sure if the Ring Road is fully paved yet...

Great, thanks for that tip regarding Reykjavik. I'll check out the cycle trails!

Noted on the parts, I definitely want to stick with a derailleur setup and not do IGH, but that's as far as I've gotten... I was thinking I would just watch for a decent price on the 'higher end' groupsets of the C&V. I think I'll have time to practice servicing and working on the bike before leaving. Just thinking out loud. Now, if I don't end up with a frameset and have a complete bike to start with, I'll just give it a service and see how it feels I suppose. I definitely plan on new wheels and tires regardless.

I think 40mm tires will be tough to fit with fenders, but I think 32 is definitely possible... If I wasn't going C&V my plan was to build up a Soma Wolverine.

I really appreciate your response and will keep your username noted! Thanks!

RamAlaRag 08-13-19 09:47 PM


Originally Posted by Lascauxcaveman (Post 21074483)
I guess I better add this one to the bucket list - Iceland! I haven't even considered that one yet!

Right after John O' Groats to Land's End, after Ireland, after France, after Italy, Croatia... :lol:

Haha, I have a weird obsession with very cold climates.....

Fly out for a few days on my way back/out from Reykjavik! Haha.

RamAlaRag 08-13-19 09:49 PM


Originally Posted by deux jambes (Post 21074509)
Ah... the frame is to big then. The seller has it listed as 57.5 c-t

Regardless, you might want to take a peek at it not to buy it it of course, but to see what an 80ís Novara Randonee might offer you as yet an option to your quest for a frame.

Portland CL

https://portland.craigslist.org/mlt/...954124670.html

That seems like a great value, I appreciate this.

RamAlaRag 08-13-19 09:52 PM


Originally Posted by Salamandrine (Post 21074519)
The importance of components is to some degree over rated. I do think reliability is good. The frame matters. Wheels and tires matter. Other than that, the parts won't make much difference as long as you stick to reasonable quality and set it up properly. No fun if stuff breaks. I would recommend 36h wheels, but nothing too heavy is required IME. Nice to have the resiliency to be able to lose a spoke. Get good tires and a comfortable seat. Pick what you like or better yet buy a fully set up bike and fix it up as necessary.


I suggest SPD rather than vintage pedals. They are just better. Also, I'd probably go with aero levers. If only because it makes it easy to work on your bike upside down in camp if you need to.


In modern speak, my old Univega was a frankenbike. I bought a frame and then built it up with stuff from my junk box plus what could buy for a good deal. Ended up with lots of then out of fashion bike boom parts. Lemme see, Cinelli bar and stem, Avocet cranks, Suntour derailleurs and shifters, Mafac canti brakes, Lyotard 23 pedals, Zeus seatpost and a Turbo seat IIRC. I dutifully built up some 27 x 1 1/4 clinchers as was the practice of the time, Super champ 58 I think. Never used them though, since I decided that my training tubulars were strong enough, and would roll faster. I hated clinchers...

Noted, thank you! My main concern is reliability/durability. I definitely want to try and put something on it from the Box O' Crap.

degan 08-13-19 09:58 PM

I've done a fair bit of touring, mostly on a Schwinn High Sierra that I converted into a tourer. I'd suggest bar-end shifters (or DT I guess) over brifters, something I'm glad I did. A mechanical mishap I've had on a long tour was a cable housing end give way which allowed the cable housing to start to pull itself into the shifter, making indexing impossible. I rigged it together enough so that it would be rideable, switched it to friction mode, and made it the few days necessary to get to a town with a bike shop. A similar problem with brifters would have been much more difficult to figure our on the side of the road and could have done some damage to the little parts inside the shifter. I also went with 26" over a 700c frame. When I'm riding fully loaded 26" wheels feel so much better. I don't know if they're actually stronger or more stiff because they're smaller or if the smaller wheels allows for a lower center of gravity or what, but its like night and day for me. I also once had to buy a giant knobby 26" tire off a Roadmaster at a general store in the middle of nowhere when my tire had a sidewall failure. Wouldn't have been able to do that with a 700c tire. I'd say, go ultralight with your gear, but go simple with the bike itself. Quality wheels and tires matter more than the frame.
https://i.postimg.cc/4dzM9Gym/bike.jpg

RamAlaRag 08-13-19 10:04 PM


Originally Posted by degan (Post 21074572)
I've done a fair bit of touring, mostly on a Schwinn High Sierra that I converted into a tourer. I'd suggest bar-end shifters (or DT I guess) over brifters, something I'm glad I did. A mechanical mishap I've had on a long tour was a cable housing end give way which allowed the cable housing to start to pull itself into the shifter, making indexing impossible. I rigged it together enough so that it would be rideable, switched it to friction mode, and made it the few days necessary to get to a town with a bike shop. A similar problem with brifters would have been much more difficult to figure our on the side of the road and could have done some damage to the little parts inside the shifter. I also went with 26" over a 700c frame. When I'm riding fully loaded 26" wheels feel so much better. I don't know if they're actually stronger or more stiff because they're smaller or if the smaller wheels allows for a lower center of gravity or what, but its like night and day for me. I also once had to buy a giant knobby 26" tire off a Roadmaster at a general store in the middle of nowhere when my tire had a sidewall failure. Wouldn't have been able to do that with a 700c tire. I'd say, go ultralight with your gear, but go simple with the bike itself. Quality wheels and tires matter more than the frame.
https://i.postimg.cc/4dzM9Gym/bike.jpg

Thanks for the tip, if the frame isn't setup for DT I'll consider this for sure. Also will keep the 26" wheel in mind for sure. Lower center is definitely great. I'll have to ride both and see, never been on 26's.

Wyoming eh? Looks like fun.

deux jambes 08-13-19 10:09 PM


Originally Posted by RamAlaRag (Post 21074558)
...I definitely want to try and put something on it from the Box O' Crap.

Good idea! Thereís no nod to Bike Forums C&V quite as reverent as attaching a piece from the BOC to bike that will see many miles! Iíll be including a saddle bag from the Box Oí Crap on a touring bike which Iíll begin building tomorrow.

RamAlaRag 08-13-19 10:13 PM


Originally Posted by deux jambes (Post 21074584)
Good idea! Thereís no nod to Bike Forums C&V quite as reverent as attaching a piece from the BOC to bike that will see many miles! Iíll be including a saddle bag from the Box Oí Crap on a touring bike which Iíll begin building tomorrow.

That's great! I hope I can do the honor of using something from the BOC around Iceland.... I have a couple BOC parts from round one, years ago.

gugie 08-13-19 10:43 PM

Lots of C&V bikes would work just well. I'll give a plus one for front loading your bike. Here's a couple with tent, sleeping bag, the whole shebangabang:

https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...88a49d6565.jpg

If you don't load down the rear end you can keep with a fairly lithe frameset.

jefnvk 08-13-19 11:06 PM


Originally Posted by RamAlaRag (Post 21074546)
I think 40mm tires will be tough to fit with fenders, but I think 32 is definitely possible... If I wasn't going C&V my plan was to build up a Soma Wolverine.

I really appreciate your response and will keep your username noted! Thanks!

Yep, if you have any specific questions, let me know. We did from the Airport to Reykjavik, around the Golden Circle and a bit into the highlands, then back to Reykjavik over a week. Also took a car as far as Jokulsarlon last time. I did the entire ring road in a car in 2008.

With 32mm tires, I'd suggest sticking to paved roads unless it is a well used dirt road. Normally I wouldn't be so timid, but the dirt roads can go to crap in an instant there, we had to turn back a couple times on 50mm tires.

Another tip: 10%+ grades aren't uncommon there. Make sure you have GOOD brakes. Not vintage, GOOD MODERN brakes that work in the wet. I hit 47MPH loaded up on a gravel downhill :thumb:

bikemig 08-13-19 11:06 PM

Quality C&V touring bikes tend to command a premium. Vintage MTBs, on the other hand, tend to be fairly inexpensive. But then you have to deal with either a flat bar set up (that may or may not be a downside for you) or a drop bar conversion. You end up with a stout touring bike in either case.

This is my drop bar Specialized stumpjumper that I set up for touring. It can take 26 x 2.0 tires and fenders and it has lots of gearing for pretty much any terrain. I'm running it with 3 x 8 gearing and indexed bar ends:

https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...b21d60b30c.jpg

jefnvk 08-13-19 11:19 PM

Oh and a blackout tent if youre going in the summer, or at least a really good sleeping mask. Nothing like waking up at 2am to a bright, vivid lime green ceiling cause the sun just came up. For that matter, a good tent that can withstand wind too.

RamAlaRag 08-14-19 12:28 PM


Originally Posted by gugie (Post 21074619)
Lots of C&V bikes would work just well. I'll give a plus one for front loading your bike. Here's a couple with tent, sleeping bag, the whole shebangabang:
If you don't load down the rear end you can keep with a fairly lithe frameset.

Nice looking bikes! I hope to keep the weight in the front.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:43 PM.


Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.