Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Touring with a freewheel & broken spokes?

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Touring with a freewheel & broken spokes?

Old 08-30-19, 04:30 AM
  #26  
jonwvara 
Senior Member
 
jonwvara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Washington County, Vermont, USA
Posts: 3,542

Bikes: 1966 Dawes Double Blue, 1976 Raleigh Gran Sport, 1975 Raleigh Sprite 27, 1980 Univega Viva Sport, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1984 Lotus Classique, 1976 Motobecane Grand Record

Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 613 Post(s)
Liked 397 Times in 218 Posts
Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
The Pocket Pro was a Victory-or-Death tool--it would often get the freewheel off, but would nearly as often break itself in half while trying. The "horns" were oddly shaped and didn't really grip anything very well. I think that was a limitation of the casting process.
__________________
www.redclovercomponents.com

"Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long."
--Ogden Nash
jonwvara is offline  
Old 08-30-19, 04:40 AM
  #27  
jonwvara 
Senior Member
 
jonwvara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Washington County, Vermont, USA
Posts: 3,542

Bikes: 1966 Dawes Double Blue, 1976 Raleigh Gran Sport, 1975 Raleigh Sprite 27, 1980 Univega Viva Sport, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1984 Lotus Classique, 1976 Motobecane Grand Record

Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 613 Post(s)
Liked 397 Times in 218 Posts
Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
Another option is to either lace the Drive-Side with Z-Bend spokes, or at least carry some as spares (although it might be a hassle to remove broken standard J-Bend spokes depending on how they break).

https://www.wheelfanatyk.com/blog/z-spokes/



I haven't tried it myself. Perhaps one would need to insert the replacement spoke from the middle of the hub, no matter whether it is replacing an inbound or outbound spoke.
I've never been able to make a Fiberfix spoke work, either. But I imagine that it can be done.

I have been told (by a very experienced bike tourist) that you can take a regular spoke and file off the head on the bottom and sides, just leaving a bit on top so that it has a sort of hook- or J-shape when viewed from the side. He said you can hook it into the hole in the hub without removing the freewheel or cassette, and it will remain in place when tensioned. I keep meaning to try it, but haven't yet. It sounds like it might work if it's possible to completely remove the broken spoke--which of course isn't always the case.
__________________
www.redclovercomponents.com

"Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long."
--Ogden Nash
jonwvara is offline  
Old 08-30-19, 08:29 AM
  #28  
mpetry912 
aged to perfection
 
mpetry912's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: PacNW
Posts: 583

Bikes: Dinucci Allez 2.0, Richard Sachs, Alex Singer, Serotta, Masi GC, Raleigh Pro Mk.1, Hetchins, etc

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 247 Post(s)
Liked 222 Times in 137 Posts
I have seen a plier tool that makes J bends out of spokes with the head cut off. I think it was Hozan that made it.

Drive side pulling spokes are the ones that most commonly break. In a 36 h wheel, that means 9 spokes carry the load. I don't have quantitative data to support this - just observation.

Assuming you could get the old spoke out, the J bend repair spoke could be carried along and provide a viable way perform a field repair on a wheel with a broken spoke.

I'm still of the opinion that a bulletproof wheel can be built by an experienced builder that will be absolutely reliable for almost any use. Hit a pothole carrying 40 Lb of loaded panniers, sure. But good wheel building "best practices" can obviate most failures. Of course, factory built wheels that are 20+ years old are going to see some spoke failures when used for loaded touring

Mark Petry
Bainbridge Island, WA USA
mpetry912 is offline  
Old 08-30-19, 09:11 AM
  #29  
ThermionicScott 
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 21,765

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 95 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3496 Post(s)
Liked 1,818 Times in 1,171 Posts
Originally Posted by mpetry912 View Post
I'm still of the opinion that a bulletproof wheel can be built by an experienced builder that will be absolutely reliable for almost any use. Hit a pothole carrying 40 Lb of loaded panniers, sure. But good wheel building "best practices" can obviate most failures.
Hear, hear!
@deux jambes, if you're concerned at all, maybe now is the time to have a good new rear wheel built. A bunch of my touring friends have gone to 40 spoke rear wheels. I know, it's 2019 and we shouldn't "need" so many spokes, but that's what's working for them. 40 good butted spokes on a stout rim, stress-relieved well...
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is online now  
Old 08-30-19, 09:38 AM
  #30  
Vintage_Cyclist
Senior Member
 
Vintage_Cyclist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Big Apple
Posts: 1,501

Bikes: yes

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 461 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 222 Times in 97 Posts
Originally Posted by jonwvara View Post
The Pocket Pro was a Victory-or-Death tool--it would often get the freewheel off, but would nearly as often break itself in half while trying. The "horns" were oddly shaped and didn't really grip anything very well. I think that was a limitation of the casting process.
I never had to use my old Pocket Pro in the field, but I did test it once while changing out a freewheel in the shop. It was a royal pain in the arse. They were curved with the idea you'd use it against your handlebars or other curved bike surface for leverage, but it didn't really make for a secure hold. Your updated version seems far superior.
Vintage_Cyclist is offline  
Old 08-30-19, 10:33 AM
  #31  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 26,876
Mentioned: 213 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15661 Post(s)
Liked 3,122 Times in 2,326 Posts
Originally Posted by jonwvara View Post
I've never been able to make a Fiberfix spoke work, either. But I imagine that it can be done.

I have been told (by a very experienced bike tourist) that you can take a regular spoke and file off the head on the bottom and sides, just leaving a bit on top so that it has a sort of hook- or J-shape when viewed from the side. He said you can hook it into the hole in the hub without removing the freewheel or cassette, and it will remain in place when tensioned. I keep meaning to try it, but haven't yet. It sounds like it might work if it's possible to completely remove the broken spoke--which of course isn't always the case.
How big are the spoke holes?

I wonder if one could stably make say a 2.3mm ball on the end of a 2.0mm spoke. Of course, it wouldn't take much... just a tiny "hook", as anything not actually in contact with the hub would be mostly irrelevant.
CliffordK is online now  
Old 08-30-19, 11:28 AM
  #32  
non-fixie 
Shifting is fun!
 
non-fixie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: South Holland, NL
Posts: 10,147

Bikes: Yes, please.

Mentioned: 259 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1868 Post(s)
Liked 2,491 Times in 1,109 Posts
Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
Hear, hear!
@deux jambes, if you're concerned at all, maybe now is the time to have a good new rear wheel built. A bunch of my touring friends have gone to 40 spoke rear wheels. I know, it's 2019 and we shouldn't "need" so many spokes, but that's what's working for them. 40 good butted spokes on a stout rim, stress-relieved well...
If I may translate that into a Top Tip: keep a look out in the local classifieds for touring wheels.

Over the past two years or so, I've found two excellent touring wheelsets with Maxi-car hubs and Mavic Module 4 rims (both 40H rear, 36H front). One set was €110, the other €200. Both came with a free touring bike.

The latest even came with a frame in my size:



__________________
Woo hoo!










Last edited by non-fixie; 08-30-19 at 11:49 AM. Reason: typo
non-fixie is offline  
Likes For non-fixie:
Old 08-31-19, 08:56 AM
  #33  
gugie 
Bike Butcher of Portland
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 10,298

Bikes: It's complicated.

Mentioned: 1133 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3862 Post(s)
Liked 3,040 Times in 1,374 Posts
On the other end of the spectrum, I built up a touring wheel for my Grander Sportier using the Velo Orange hub that doesn't require any tools to diassemble.

https://vimeo.com/23857739
__________________
If someone tells you that you have enough bicycles and you don't need any more, stop talking to them. You don't need that kind of negativity in your life.
gugie is offline  
Old 08-31-19, 09:45 AM
  #34  
seedsbelize 
smelling the roses
 
seedsbelize's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Tixkokob, Yucatán, México
Posts: 15,428

Bikes: 79 Trek 930, 80 Trek 414, 84 Schwinn Letour Luxe (coupled), 92 Schwinn Paramount PDG 5

Mentioned: 104 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7079 Post(s)
Liked 894 Times in 609 Posts
Originally Posted by mpetry912 View Post
I have seen a plier tool that makes J bends out of spokes with the head cut off. I think it was Hozan that made it.

Drive side pulling spokes are the ones that most commonly break. In a 36 h wheel, that means 9 spokes carry the load. I don't have quantitative data to support this - just observation.

Assuming you could get the old spoke out, the J bend repair spoke could be carried along and provide a viable way perform a field repair on a wheel with a broken spoke.

I'm still of the opinion that a bulletproof wheel can be built by an experienced builder that will be absolutely reliable for almost any use. Hit a pothole carrying 40 Lb of loaded panniers, sure. But good wheel building "best practices" can obviate most failures. Of course, factory built wheels that are 20+ years old are going to see some spoke failures when used for loaded touring

Mark Petry
Bainbridge Island, WA USA
Yes, my wheel was pushing 40, and had those damaged outside spokes to boot. The damage had been hidden by an after-the-fact spoke protector.
__________________
Originally Posted by Bah Humbug View Post
Auto-pause is a honey-tongued devil whispering sweet lies in your ear.


seedsbelize is offline  
Old 08-31-19, 09:48 AM
  #35  
seedsbelize 
smelling the roses
 
seedsbelize's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Tixkokob, Yucatán, México
Posts: 15,428

Bikes: 79 Trek 930, 80 Trek 414, 84 Schwinn Letour Luxe (coupled), 92 Schwinn Paramount PDG 5

Mentioned: 104 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7079 Post(s)
Liked 894 Times in 609 Posts
Originally Posted by Vintage_Cyclist View Post
I never had to use my old Pocket Pro in the field, but I did test it once while changing out a freewheel in the shop. It was a royal pain in the arse. They were curved with the idea you'd use it against your handlebars or other curved bike surface for leverage, but it didn't really make for a secure hold. Your updated version seems far superior.
I carried a tool around, in my toolbox, for years, new in package, and finally threw it out because I didn't know what it did. It was something like this. It fixed itself to the chainstay and the freewheel, and released it with a forward pedal stroke(I later learned).
__________________
Originally Posted by Bah Humbug View Post
Auto-pause is a honey-tongued devil whispering sweet lies in your ear.


seedsbelize is offline  
Old 09-01-19, 07:11 AM
  #36  
Johno59
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Cambridge UK
Posts: 775

Bikes: 1903 24 spd Sunbeam, 1927 Humber, 3 1930 Raleighs, 2 1940s Sunbeams, 2 1940s Raleighs, Rudge, 1950s Robin Hood, 1958 Claud Butler, 2 1973 Colnago Supers, Eddie Merckx, 2 1980 Holdsworth, EG Bates funny TT bike, another 6 or so 1990s bikes

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 308 Post(s)
Liked 278 Times in 151 Posts
1930s lacing



B4 keyhole eyelets (1936?) Dynohubs meant the low side used twisted spokes rather than button ended.


Even the high side used curled ends despite it being unnecessary. A long spare can be carried and simply cut to size.
Johno59 is offline  
Old 09-01-19, 07:40 AM
  #37  
scarlson 
Senior Member
 
scarlson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Medford MA
Posts: 1,776

Bikes: Ron Cooper touring, 1959 Jack Taylor 650b ladyback touring tandem, Vitus 979, Joe Bell painted Claud Butler Dalesman, Colin Laing curved tube tandem, heavily-Dilberted 1982 Trek 6xx, René Herse tandem

Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 815 Post(s)
Liked 1,066 Times in 574 Posts
Here is an article from Wheel Fanatyk in which they discuss Z-bend spokes and then try to find a modern available tool that is up to the challenge of creating Z-bends in spokes.
Wheel fanatyk article link

The tool they found to work is the Great Planes Precision Z-Bend Pliers, originally made to put Z-bends in model airplane control rods. WF used to sell the tool but no longer does. Luckily,
it is still available on Amazon.

Could just carry one of these pliers around, along with a few extra long spoke "blanks" with the possibility of buying more if you ran out, but as others have mentioned it doesn't fix the problem you have if you can't get the old broken spoke head out of the hub.
scarlson is offline  
Old 09-02-19, 02:24 AM
  #38  
Johno59
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Cambridge UK
Posts: 775

Bikes: 1903 24 spd Sunbeam, 1927 Humber, 3 1930 Raleighs, 2 1940s Sunbeams, 2 1940s Raleighs, Rudge, 1950s Robin Hood, 1958 Claud Butler, 2 1973 Colnago Supers, Eddie Merckx, 2 1980 Holdsworth, EG Bates funny TT bike, another 6 or so 1990s bikes

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 308 Post(s)
Liked 278 Times in 151 Posts
Shaping the Z

I just twist curly ends with some pliers in a vise - two pair of pliers in a pinch will work. Obviously not on the road but twist the correct length before you go. As for the broken spoke, you can always get it out but you have to monster it- for me the ability to get a new one in was the deal-breaker. Needless to say with a Dynohub it was near impossible without curly spokes either in a workshop or on the Roadside.
Johno59 is offline  
Old 09-02-19, 06:58 AM
  #39  
jonwvara 
Senior Member
 
jonwvara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Washington County, Vermont, USA
Posts: 3,542

Bikes: 1966 Dawes Double Blue, 1976 Raleigh Gran Sport, 1975 Raleigh Sprite 27, 1980 Univega Viva Sport, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1984 Lotus Classique, 1976 Motobecane Grand Record

Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 613 Post(s)
Liked 397 Times in 218 Posts
Originally Posted by Johno59 View Post
...As for the broken spoke, you can always get it out but you have to monster it...
This sounds pretty severe. Not quite sure what it means, though.
__________________
www.redclovercomponents.com

"Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long."
--Ogden Nash
jonwvara is offline  
Old 09-02-19, 01:16 PM
  #40  
Miele Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,529

Bikes: iele Latina, Miele Suprema, Miele Uno LS, Miele Miele Beta, MMTB, Bianchi Model Unknown, Fiori Venezia, Fiori Napoli, VeloSport Adamas AX

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1266 Post(s)
Liked 852 Times in 590 Posts
Originally Posted by davester View Post
...and before Jon's tool, there was a similar tool that can still be found on ebay that worked using fence posts or other convenient stationary objects. .
Are you thinking of the old school Pocket Vice? I have one and some 1981 and 1982 BICYCLING magazines. One of the magazines has an ad for the Pocket vice in it and states that it can be use with the bicycle stem. I wonder if it'd mar the stem? Here're some images of the Pocket Vice.







Cheers
Miele Man is offline  
Old 09-02-19, 01:37 PM
  #41  
Miele Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,529

Bikes: iele Latina, Miele Suprema, Miele Uno LS, Miele Miele Beta, MMTB, Bianchi Model Unknown, Fiori Venezia, Fiori Napoli, VeloSport Adamas AX

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1266 Post(s)
Liked 852 Times in 590 Posts
Originally Posted by jonwvara View Post
The Pocket Pro was a Victory-or-Death tool--it would often get the freewheel off, but would nearly as often break itself in half while trying. The "horns" were oddly shaped and didn't really grip anything very well. I think that was a limitation of the casting process.
I used my Pocket Vice a few years back to remove a REALLY stuck freewheel from a friend'd wheel. He was amazed at how much force it took. I Guess O"m lucky with my Pocket Vice.

Cheers
Miele Man is offline  
Old 09-02-19, 03:26 PM
  #42  
phillman5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 69
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by mpetry912 View Post
if I was going to do a long tour (like I did in 2009) I'd suggest a 130mm over locknut (OLD) rear wheel, 36h Phil hub, DT 14g straight guage spokes on the drive side, and a 7 speed FW, DA MF 7400 if you can find one.
Hmmm, never thought about touring, I just gave my 36 hole Phil Wood hubs to a bike shop hat makes up bikes for poor/homeless etc. I am not sure if it would have taken a 7 speed FW, probably should have, I only had a six on it. But they are plentiful on e-bay for a song, that why I just gave them away.
phillman5 is offline  
Old 09-02-19, 03:31 PM
  #43  
phillman5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 69
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by deux jambes View Post
I’m guessing most prefer a cassette, but those of you who ride long distances away from home, or bike shops, and perhaps for more than a day or two...
Please tell me. How do you deal with the misfortune of a broken drive side rear spoke on the road? I can’t imagine many folks carrying a heavy crescent wrench that’s big enough to turn a freewheel removal tool.
The question is coming up for me as a touring build gets closer to competition & the plan to ride out of town for camping draws nearer. I’d like to be best prepared for the chance of any rear drive side spoke breakage up the road.
I’ll add that in my case, I’m a light weight rider, and the bike will be carrying its load up front. Mostly paved road too. So maybe just true up as best as possible and rely on the remaining 35 spokes to do their job?
My bother and I rode from Tucson to Ludington Mi (we crossed the pond via a ferry after visiting several breweries in Milwaukee) in 1975. Since our freewheels needed different removal tools we took one of each. We DID have one drive side spoke break but luckily there was a farm near by and the farmer let use use his bench mounted vice. Problem solved.
phillman5 is offline  
Old 09-03-19, 02:52 AM
  #44  
Johno59
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Cambridge UK
Posts: 775

Bikes: 1903 24 spd Sunbeam, 1927 Humber, 3 1930 Raleighs, 2 1940s Sunbeams, 2 1940s Raleighs, Rudge, 1950s Robin Hood, 1958 Claud Butler, 2 1973 Colnago Supers, Eddie Merckx, 2 1980 Holdsworth, EG Bates funny TT bike, another 6 or so 1990s bikes

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 308 Post(s)
Liked 278 Times in 151 Posts
Monster it

Originally Posted by jonwvara View Post
This sounds pretty severe. Not quite sure what it means, though.
Monster it means bend, twist, punch, pull and swear aloud and you'll get the broken spoke out. As regards removing the freewheel on the Roadside - it may help to remove the FW before your journey begins, regrease it and reinstall. I have had to cut across rear freewheels/sprockets with a hacksaw coz they'd been on for years, even decades and no amount of force could remove them.
Johno59 is offline  
Old 09-03-19, 05:25 AM
  #45  
jonwvara 
Senior Member
 
jonwvara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Washington County, Vermont, USA
Posts: 3,542

Bikes: 1966 Dawes Double Blue, 1976 Raleigh Gran Sport, 1975 Raleigh Sprite 27, 1980 Univega Viva Sport, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1984 Lotus Classique, 1976 Motobecane Grand Record

Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 613 Post(s)
Liked 397 Times in 218 Posts
Originally Posted by Johno59 View Post
Monster it means bend, twist, punch, pull and swear aloud and you'll get the broken spoke out. As regards removing the freewheel on the Roadside - it may help to remove the FW before your journey begins, regrease it and reinstall. I have had to cut across rear freewheels/sprockets with a hacksaw coz they'd been on for years, even decades and no amount of force could remove them.
Thanks for the explanation. I guess I need to take a remedial colloquialism class.

And you're right, it's a good idea to remove, grease, and reinstall a freewheel before going on a tour. I think that's mentioned in the directions for using the Freewheel Key. If it's not, it should be. I ought to look.
__________________
www.redclovercomponents.com

"Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long."
--Ogden Nash
jonwvara is offline  
Old 09-03-19, 07:39 AM
  #46  
ThermionicScott 
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 21,765

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 95 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3496 Post(s)
Liked 1,818 Times in 1,171 Posts
Also called "Beast mode."
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is online now  
Old 09-03-19, 11:04 AM
  #47  
sewupnut
Senior Member
 
sewupnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Mountains and Plains of Colorado
Posts: 241

Bikes: 2005 Seven Odonata (DuraAce /Reynolds),1983 Trek 950 (Mavic/Suntour/Regina), 1986 Stumpjumper Shimano/Suntour/Regina), 1986 MASI 3V, (Campy/Mavic/Regina) 1995 Schwinn LeTour (Suntour/Wienmann/Phil/Shimano/Regina): All Brooks Saddles

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by noobinsf View Post
A bikeforums member @jonwvara makes a tool that inserts into road sign posts to give you leverage to unscrew your freewheel:

New! The Freewheel Key
My collection of Regina cogs is going to outlive me. So I will continue to ride my old Letour
with 6-speed freewells. Have yet to break a spoke, but it's just a matter of time. Great tool to have.
sewupnut is offline  
Old 09-03-19, 11:27 AM
  #48  
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 10,237

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 111 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3308 Post(s)
Liked 2,035 Times in 1,323 Posts
I'd go with a 36 spoke wheel, X3 or 4, with right-side spokes one gauge heavier than the rest and carry a FW tool. Build the wheel well. Use a proven hub. Shimano, Phi Wood or the like. Grease the hub threads well with lots quality (Phil Wood or equiv.) grease. If you are really paranoid, bring the smallest crescent wrench that will open to fit the FW tool. You will need to find a pipe and your wrench will be trash after but it will work.

I cannot claim long tours, just a few solo tours (Boston to Detroit, Minneapolis to Saginaw Michigan) but I did those in the '70s long before cassettes. Never had an issue with spokes.

If you mix Italian and Japanese hubs and freewheels, ride that combo first, then take off the FW, re-grease and re-install BEFORE you leave. Italian threads were (are?) cut and Japanese threads were and are rolled, The first time you mix them, you are forcing the peaks of the Italian threads down to the rolled rounds of the Japanese threads. It's a hard install and even harder removal. You want full shop tools that first time. After that, your Italian threads are "rolled" and you won't have further issues. (I've put many SunTour FWs on Campagnolo hubs.)

Ben
79pmooney is online now  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
C_LOGAN
Bicycle Mechanics
29
04-21-20 07:45 AM
steltz02
Touring
19
01-05-13 04:23 PM
jeneralist
Classic & Vintage
6
04-03-12 07:46 AM
Jose Mandez
Classic & Vintage
136
01-24-11 11:49 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.