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Made in Austria road bike

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Made in Austria road bike

Old 10-12-19, 03:57 PM
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gorgi991
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Made in Austria road bike

ok,i bought this gem recently,repainted it,it was labbeled as taifun and had a sticker that said made in austria,i cant find any other road bike with that brand only some old lighters that were indeed made in austria
as for parts it has some altenburger briliant brakes
suchs hurret Derailleur and shifters
and van scothorst 27x 1/4 rims
anybody of you own any similar bike to this?
the only similar that i fund on the web was this one
https://www.okoloo.co.uk/Ads-3944-Gr...ght-168-175-cm
it is made in germany and its almost identical
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Old 10-12-19, 04:04 PM
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it says E56E or ESGE
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Old 10-12-19, 07:01 PM
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ESGE. My Dutch Batavus had a bridge like that and my little Condor from Switzerland does also. Common on low-to-mid range Euro bikes, as is the kickstand mount plate.

Last edited by thumpism; 10-12-19 at 07:04 PM.
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Old 10-13-19, 02:18 AM
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Originally Posted by thumpism View Post
ESGE. My Dutch Batavus had a bridge like that and my little Condor from Switzerland does also. Common on low-to-mid range Euro bikes, as is the kickstand mount plate.
Agree. Its called a "Pletscherplatte" and, i hate to say it, is a sure sign for a buyer to walk away when hunting for high quality... that doesnt mean duch frames can't be used to make a nice-riding bike
Will be impossible to find the originial brand. Bikes with frames like these were to be had everywhere, from department stores to gas stations. I think most were made in the former eastern block (Czechoslovakia) and sold as OEM with any kind of label.
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Old 10-13-19, 06:18 AM
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The crimped stay ends and heavily crimped stay caps are reminiscent of bicycles made by Puch for the entry level markets. They also used rear dropouts where both eyelets were arranged close together on a raised hump, though I can't recall seeing a version with an oval hole.

If you Google "Taifun Fahrrad", which is German for "Taifun bicycle", you come up with numerous samples, including many relatively modern, entry level models. So, it does appear to be a legitimate bicycle brand from that region of Europe, though possibly a marketing brand that was contract manufactured.

What I find most interesting about the subject bicycle is the headlamp bracket on the right fork blade, indicating that it was intended for a market where they drive on the left side of the road. Obviouslythis one wasn't intended for the Austrian or German markets.

Edit: Taifun translates to Typhoon.

Edit: Found a reference to Taifun having been a bicycle brand owned by Alfred Strauch GmbH & Co. KG, a German automotive and industrial parts supply company founded in 1923. The company still exists but the bicycle brand has been owned by the Intersports corporation of Austria since 2000.

Last edited by T-Mar; 10-13-19 at 06:51 AM.
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Old 10-13-19, 06:43 AM
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
The crimped stay ends and heavily crimped stay caps are reminiscent of bicycles made by Puch for the entry level markets. They also used rear dropouts where both eyelets were arranged close together on a raised hump, though I can't recall seeing a version with an oval hole.

If you Google "Taifun Fahrrad", which is German for "Taifun bicycle", you come up with numerous samples, including many relatively modern, entry level models. So, it does appear to be a legitimate bicycle brand from that region of Europe, though possibly a marketing brand that was contract manufactured.

What I find most interesting about the subject bicycle is the headlamp bracket on the right fork blade, indicating that it was intended for a market where they drive on the left side of the road. Obviouslythis one wasn't intended for the Austrian or German markets.
actually it used to be a dynamo motor there that probably used to power up a lamp but i removed it
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Old 10-13-19, 06:53 AM
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Btw i want to get some brake hoods for this,are the size universal? and do you have to recommend me any? also how is that thing in the top called? (where the house cable goes)
i also need help with the chainring,it seems like it is press fit,is there any chance that i can remove it from the crankset? the reason is that it wiggles,and it doesnt seem normal to me.
i also ordered some 9.5mm cotter pins,but i didnt measure the old one,i just read that it is the common size for german bikes,did i mess up or i got the right one?



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Old 10-13-19, 07:30 AM
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Fork's bent
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Old 10-13-19, 07:51 AM
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My first priority would be to straighten the fork. I would have done that before the repaint.

I'm not sure what fits the Alternburger levers, but it looks like any Weinmann/Dia-Compe compatible hoods might work.

What you have is a swaged crankset. By wiggle, do you mean that the chainring does not run true or that there is actual play in it? Chainrings that don't run true can be straightened by careful application of force using an adjustable wrench. at the affected points. What appears to be chainring play if often in the bearings or crankarm/spindle interface. Assumming that you have eliminated these possibilities, actual play means the chainring is loose at either one of the rivets at the end of the spider or the swage where the spider fits the crankarm. Play at the spider rivets can be resolved by drilling them out and replacing with a nut and bolt or compressing the existing rivet in the jaws of vice grips or a vice. Play at the swage is more difficult to address. It can sometimes be solved by compressing the swage flange in a vice.

I'm not sure about the cotter size. The obvious answer is to measure the current cotters.

Given the crankset issues, many members would suggest replacement with a more modern aluminum, cotterless crankset that would be also drop the weight significantly.

Having said all this, what you have is very low end bicycle in need of some rather extensive work. Rather than sinking more money into it, you may want to consider investing that money into a higher grade, better condition, used bicycle.
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Old 10-13-19, 12:57 PM
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-----

Frame Notes -

the bulge-formed head is by Agrati and is pattern called "EXPORT"

seat lug is Agrati pattern "AMERICA" is is bottom bracket shell

ESGE plate style bridges, as mentioned above, are by Pletscher AG of Switzerland

https://www.pletscher.ch/index.php/

The bicycle's welded fork crown is one employed widely by both Puch and by several German makers. Do not know its identity.

---

One possible way to rule in or out a Puch contract build would be to check the steerer diameter. If 26.0mm this would suggest a Puch product.

---

The swaged and riveted chainset appears to have some markings on the backside of the crankarms. It may be by Thun. If cycle a Puch product one would expect a wedge bolt size of 9.5mm.

-----
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Old 10-13-19, 05:59 PM
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
Fork's bent
Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
My first priority would be to straighten the fork. I would have done that before the repaint.

I'm not sure what fits the Alternburger levers, but it looks like any Weinmann/Dia-Compe compatible hoods might work.

What you have is a swaged crankset. By wiggle, do you mean that the chainring does not run true or that there is actual play in it? Chainrings that don't run true can be straightened by careful application of force using an adjustable wrench. at the affected points. What appears to be chainring play if often in the bearings or crankarm/spindle interface. Assumming that you have eliminated these possibilities, actual play means the chainring is loose at either one of the rivets at the end of the spider or the swage where the spider fits the crankarm. Play at the spider rivets can be resolved by drilling them out and replacing with a nut and bolt or compressing the existing rivet in the jaws of vice grips or a vice. Play at the swage is more difficult to address. It can sometimes be solved by compressing the swage flange in a vice.

I'm not sure about the cotter size. The obvious answer is to measure the current cotters.

Given the crankset issues, many members would suggest replacement with a more modern aluminum, cotterless crankset that would be also drop the weight significantly.

Having said all this, what you have is very low end bicycle in need of some rather extensive work. Rather than sinking more money into it, you may want to consider investing that money into a higher grade, better condition, used bicycle.
Oh,I thought it was normal to be like this,how i am going to straight it up?
it rides really weird..maybe i need to reposition the saddle as well and the bars also..
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Old 10-13-19, 06:04 PM
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i also own a custom coppi bike,which i broke the frame and rewelded it,and i felt really bad about it,because it easily costs over 1k euros
i got it free from my uncle but i didnt repspected it enough,even tho i had the best rides in it.
i bought this one for 60euros
spent +40 euros for tyres,tubes,and spray's
i also ordered a new chain,tape and accelerometer (total 15 euro)
so yeah now i own a 110 euro bike that i can abuse as much as i want,i still like the way it rides,but i feel like the bike its too large for me and its quite uncomfortable
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Old 10-13-19, 06:15 PM
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
My first priority would be to straighten the fork. I would have done that before the repaint.

I'm not sure what fits the Alternburger levers, but it looks like any Weinmann/Dia-Compe compatible hoods might work.

What you have is a swaged crankset. By wiggle, do you mean that the chainring does not run true or that there is actual play in it? Chainrings that don't run true can be straightened by careful application of force using an adjustable wrench. at the affected points. What appears to be chainring play if often in the bearings or crankarm/spindle interface. Assumming that you have eliminated these possibilities, actual play means the chainring is loose at either one of the rivets at the end of the spider or the swage where the spider fits the crankarm. Play at the spider rivets can be resolved by drilling them out and replacing with a nut and bolt or compressing the existing rivet in the jaws of vice grips or a vice. Play at the swage is more difficult to address. It can sometimes be solved by compressing the swage flange in a vice.

I'm not sure about the cotter size. The obvious answer is to measure the current cotters.

Given the crankset issues, many members would suggest replacement with a more modern aluminum, cotterless crankset that would be also drop the weight significantly.

Having said all this, what you have is very low end bicycle in need of some rather extensive work. Rather than sinking more money into it, you may want to consider investing that money into a higher grade, better condition, used bicycle.
the issue is on the swage,its just a very little play,then it engages and locks in but its kind of anoying,
i thought that part on the middle was a kind of a bolt,but i cant tight it at all,what is the vice thing you are talking about? is there any way to do it at home?
i allready looked at ebay for used cranksets,found some single disc for 15 euros but they did not include the axle.
plus they did not use an oval axel
so the price will go up for a total set,and i dont even know if they gonna fit in the bottom bracket
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Old 10-13-19, 06:21 PM
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
I'm not sure what fits the Alternburger levers, but it looks like any Weinmann/Dia-Compe compatible hoods might work.
They do. It's what I used on mine.
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Old 10-13-19, 09:28 PM
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It rides really weird because it should look something like this.

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Old 10-14-19, 07:42 AM
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Originally Posted by gorgi991 View Post
Oh,I thought it was normal to be like this,how i am going to straight it up?
Well, you could try something like this.


Realistically though, the best solution is to replace the fork.
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