Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Too old to ride?

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Too old to ride?

Old 11-23-19, 06:37 AM
  #1  
Colorado Kid
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 516
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 147 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 19 Times in 12 Posts
Too old to ride?

At what point do you give up trying to find parts for your CV bike and make it a wall hanger? 50s-40s or later?
Colorado Kid is offline  
Old 11-23-19, 06:45 AM
  #2  
ollo_ollo
Senior Member
 
ollo_ollo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Near Sublimity Orygun
Posts: 4,931

Bikes: Still have a few left!

Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 345 Post(s)
Liked 79 Times in 50 Posts
Well, I'm 79 and hoped to do another decade or so before hanging up my CV bikes. (I know you're referring to the old bike vs parts dilemma, not the rider, but seems to me easier to keep an old bike going than an old body) Don
ollo_ollo is offline  
Likes For ollo_ollo:
Old 11-23-19, 06:46 AM
  #3  
SJX426 
Senior Member
 
SJX426's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Fredericksburg, Va
Posts: 7,708

Bikes: '73 Bottecchia Giro d'Italia, '83 Colnago Superissimo, '84 Trek 610, '84 Trek 760, '88 Pinarello Veneto, '88 De Rosa Pro, '90 De Rosa Professional, '91 Pinarello Montello, '94 Burley Duet, 97 Specialized RockHopper, 2010 Langster, Tern Link D8

Mentioned: 55 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 971 Post(s)
Liked 608 Times in 386 Posts
One of the benefits of adhering to N+1 is "cycling" through the collection. Parts last longer with less use. Exposure to harmful environmental conditions, like UV, can help preserve some parts too.
For me, I don't know the answer. My wall hanger is ridable. I just have enough other to put one on the wall to admire.

Of course, the other approach is to prepare. How many older rims, period correct for the bike, are stored for future use?

Sometimes I think accidents are harder to avoid than finding parts! Bent frames are not always cost effective to repair or replace.
__________________
Bikes don't stand alone. They are two tired.
SJX426 is offline  
Likes For SJX426:
Old 11-23-19, 07:59 AM
  #4  
easyupbug 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,585

Bikes: too many sparkly Italians, some sweet Americans and a couple interesting Japanese

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 259 Post(s)
Liked 122 Times in 92 Posts
To me age is not the only factor. I have bought two wall hangers, sold one and still riding the other. I now may have one my own, a '89 ironman with the grey marble paint with a head tube lug brazing failure. If repaired I could never get the paint touched up or matched if a full respray so headed for a wall somewhere.
easyupbug is offline  
Likes For easyupbug:
Old 11-23-19, 08:09 AM
  #5  
amedias
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Devon, UK
Posts: 111
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Liked 82 Times in 30 Posts
Iím not into wall hangers, the principal interaction with a bicycle is by riding, if you donít ride it youíre only getting a one dimensional experience of it, the ride IS the bike.

Current oldest in progress build is 1930ís, Iíll have no reservations riding it once complete, and would rebuild older too, if parts are hard or impossible to find then thatís when you have to start making them ;-)
amedias is offline  
Old 11-23-19, 08:19 AM
  #6  
Classtime 
Senior Member
 
Classtime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 2,721

Bikes: 81 Medici, 2011 Richard Sachs, 2011 Milwaukee Road

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1023 Post(s)
Liked 411 Times in 288 Posts
My newest bike, an 2011 model, was my only wall hanger. Sadly, my wife only put up with it for 24 hours. The internet has allowed us to keep ANY old bike a rider. I wish I knew these days were coming when I abondoned an old rod braked roadster, and a lovely Italian and a French frame with stuck stems.

Last edited by Classtime; 11-23-19 at 08:15 PM.
Classtime is offline  
Likes For Classtime:
Old 11-23-19, 08:21 AM
  #7  
iab
Senior Member
 
iab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: NW Burbs, Chicago
Posts: 10,653
Mentioned: 146 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2133 Post(s)
Liked 1,231 Times in 573 Posts
I needed brakes, saddle and wheelset to make this 1920s Frejus rideable.


Before_Frejus01 by iabisdb, on Flickr


Found the brakeset in France.


Bowden Calipers 01 by iabisdb, on Flickr


Frejus Levers 03 by iabisdb, on Flickr



Rudi from here made me a repro saddle.


Frejus Saddle 03 by iabisdb, on Flickr


Frejus Saddle 01 by iabisdb, on Flickr



Hubs came out of Italy.


Scambio 100 by iabisdb, on Flickr



Reproduction rims were also out of Italy and Bob's yer uncle.


2L by iabisdb, on Flickr
iab is offline  
Old 11-23-19, 08:31 AM
  #8  
iab
Senior Member
 
iab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: NW Burbs, Chicago
Posts: 10,653
Mentioned: 146 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2133 Post(s)
Liked 1,231 Times in 573 Posts
Similar story for this 1933 Frejus and 1950s Cinelli. I don't see a reason to make a wall hanger unless you want a wallhanger. Age has nothing to do with it.


_MG_8990 by iabisdb, on Flickr



_MG_9018 by iabisdb, on Flickr
iab is offline  
Old 11-23-19, 09:06 AM
  #9  
Miele Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,288

Bikes: iele Latina, Miele Suprema, Miele Uno LS, Miele Miele Beta, MMTB, Bianchi Model Unknown, Fiori Venezia, Fiori Napoli, VeloSport Adamas AX

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1165 Post(s)
Liked 730 Times in 508 Posts
If worse came to worse ans I had a really old bike I liked the ride of I'd just put more modern parts on it and enjoy it longer.

Cheers
Miele Man is offline  
Old 11-23-19, 09:15 AM
  #10  
tkamd73 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Menomonee Falls, WI
Posts: 997

Bikes: 1984 Schwinn Supersport, 1988 Trek 400t, 1977 Trek TX900, 1983 Bianchi Champione del Mondo, 1986 Trek 400 Elance, 1978 Raleigh Supercourse, 1991 PDG Paramount OS, 1971 Schwinn Sports Tourer, 1985 Trek 670

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 332 Post(s)
Liked 280 Times in 179 Posts
Are you asking about the bike or the rider?
Tim
tkamd73 is offline  
Old 11-23-19, 09:43 AM
  #11  
stardognine
Senior Member
 
stardognine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Arid Arizona, for now.
Posts: 2,797

Bikes: 1995 Cannondale Killer V

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 731 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 302 Times in 221 Posts
That 1920s Frejus is gorgeous! 😎👍😎

I think that's the perfect place for the pump pegs, too, keeps the front open for bottle cages. 🙂
stardognine is offline  
Old 11-23-19, 09:53 AM
  #12  
Bad Lag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: So Cal, for now
Posts: 1,378

Bikes: 1975 Bob Jackson - Nuovo Record, Brooks Pro, Clips & Straps

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 502 Post(s)
Liked 115 Times in 76 Posts
Is OP asking when a bike is too old or when a rider is too old?

Does a rider hang up his bike as a symbol of being too old and give up riding?

Does he mean the bike is too old to ride, so hang it up and get something else to ride?


C&V bicycles vs modern bikes: I was looking at rims last night. A pair of road rims was $2,000. So, yeah, I will continue to ride and maintain my C&V cycles for as long as I live.

Last edited by Bad Lag; 11-23-19 at 12:02 PM.
Bad Lag is offline  
Old 11-23-19, 10:12 AM
  #13  
scarlson
Senior Member
 
scarlson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Medford MA
Posts: 1,212

Bikes: Ron Cooper touring, 1959 Jack Taylor 650b ladyback touring tandem, Vitus 979, Joe Bell painted Claud Butler Dalesman, Colin Laing curved tube tandem, heavily-Dilberted 1982 Trek 6xx, Renť Herse tandem

Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 525 Post(s)
Liked 644 Times in 372 Posts
I recently took my '59 Jack Taylor tandem into technical-enough terrain on some Cape Cod dune roads that I crashed it. We're in our 30s and we got a good deal of road rash but our joints and bones are fine and that's what's important. The tandem, which is 60, just got covered in sand, and shrugged the impact off better than us!

I say ride 'em like you stole 'em, you can't take 'em with you when you croak!
scarlson is offline  
Old 11-23-19, 10:29 AM
  #14  
uncle uncle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: south kansas america
Posts: 1,728

Bikes: too many

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 338 Post(s)
Liked 89 Times in 69 Posts
Originally Posted by scarlson View Post
I say ride 'em like you stole 'em, you can't take 'em with you when you croak!
You probably can, but it's going to require a coffin that's not an "off the shelf" model.
uncle uncle is offline  
Likes For uncle uncle:
Old 11-23-19, 10:37 AM
  #15  
Insidious C. 
Crash Test Dummy
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: PNW
Posts: 1,266

Bikes: One of everything and three of everything French

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 311 Post(s)
Liked 151 Times in 93 Posts
Isn't trying to find parts part of the joy of the C&V hobby?
Insidious C. is online now  
Old 11-23-19, 10:38 AM
  #16  
blackbomber
Member
 
blackbomber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Unionville, CT USA
Posts: 46

Bikes: 1932 Simmons Banner

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
Liked 44 Times in 12 Posts


'32 Simmons Banner in kid mode
For me it depends on the type of riding. I regularly rode my 1932 Simmons(Schwinn built) Motobike until I discovered a broken stem a month ago. Iím running 33mm cyclocross tubulars stretched onto period correct clad wooden rims. Itís not the best stopping bike, and the gearing on those pre-war bikes makes you think twice before pulling a trailer up hill. But I like to get it out and seen in non-vintage bike events. I figure if people see me riding an old bike in jeans on the road, it might make bicycling seem more approachable to a newbie.

Last edited by blackbomber; 11-24-19 at 11:31 AM.
blackbomber is offline  
Old 11-23-19, 10:43 AM
  #17  
Slightspeed
Senior Member
 
Slightspeed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 2,207

Bikes: 1964 Legnano Roma Olympiade, 1973 Raleigh Super Course, 1978 Raleigh Super Course, 1978 Peugeot PR10, 2002 Specialized Allez, 2007 Specialized Roubaix, 2013 Culprit Croz Blade

Mentioned: 64 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 720 Post(s)
Liked 688 Times in 377 Posts
I'm 70, my Legnano is 55, and we are still putting on the miles. The oldest bike I have is another Legnano, from 1961, but I got it less than a year ago. Last year, before Eroica, I had new wheels built, and serviced the bearings, and chain. Keep the tires and brake pads in good shape and there is no reason to ever hang a bike on the wall. Just ride it!


Me, on the right, 1965, on my new Legnano Roma Olympiad.

2019, me and the Legnano, still rolling along.

A couple years ago, I came across this guy, on his way to church. I was on a 1973 Raleigh, he said his bike had me beat by almost 100 years.

Last edited by Slightspeed; 11-23-19 at 10:48 AM.
Slightspeed is offline  
Likes For Slightspeed:
Old 11-23-19, 10:46 AM
  #18  
randyjawa 
Senior Member
 
randyjawa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada - burrrrr!
Posts: 10,575

Bikes: 1958 Rabeneick 120D, 1968 Legnano Gran Premio, 196? Torpado Professional, 2000 Marinoni Piuma

Mentioned: 182 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1020 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 745 Times in 459 Posts
At what point do you give up trying to find parts for your CV bike and make it a wall hanger? 50s-40s or later?
I would like to say that, for me, such a situation would never occur - but it did, at least once, however; the issue was cost to restore, not the availability of components or skill lever, on my part.

How I wanted to build up this old CCM "Road Racer". Sadly, to do so would have broken my fixed income bank (nothing is really fixed, the income program is truly broken at my place - anyway...)





The same situation cropped up with this old Zeus. Buying specific bike parts can cost a lot. So, the Zeus went the same way as the CCM...
__________________
"98% of the bikes I buy are projects".
randyjawa is offline  
Old 11-23-19, 10:55 AM
  #19  
scarlson
Senior Member
 
scarlson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Medford MA
Posts: 1,212

Bikes: Ron Cooper touring, 1959 Jack Taylor 650b ladyback touring tandem, Vitus 979, Joe Bell painted Claud Butler Dalesman, Colin Laing curved tube tandem, heavily-Dilberted 1982 Trek 6xx, Renť Herse tandem

Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 525 Post(s)
Liked 644 Times in 372 Posts
Originally Posted by blackbomber View Post
But I like to get it out and seen in non-vintage bike events. I figure if people see me riding an old bike in jeans on the road, it might make bicycling seem more approachable to a newbie.
I genuinely like riding the old stuff, too. It's just what I'm used to, and it doesn't slow me down any, so why change? It also makes people reluctant to ask me to loan them a bike, which can be either good or bad.

But sometimes I see it going the other way. Seeing how crazy I am with the old stuff has been enough to put some newbies I know off of cycling. Like they think they have to be able to machine parts for a vintage bike in order to own one, just because they see that's what I've done.
scarlson is offline  
Old 11-23-19, 11:13 AM
  #20  
Slightspeed
Senior Member
 
Slightspeed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 2,207

Bikes: 1964 Legnano Roma Olympiade, 1973 Raleigh Super Course, 1978 Raleigh Super Course, 1978 Peugeot PR10, 2002 Specialized Allez, 2007 Specialized Roubaix, 2013 Culprit Croz Blade

Mentioned: 64 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 720 Post(s)
Liked 688 Times in 377 Posts
Originally Posted by randyjawa View Post
I would like to say that, for me, such a situation would never occur - but it did, at least once, however; the issue was cost to restore, not the availability of components or skill lever, on my part.

How I wanted to build up this old CCM "Road Racer". Sadly, to do so would have broken my fixed income bank (nothing is really fixed, the income program is truly broken at my place - anyway...)





The same situation cropped up with this old Zeus. Buying specific bike parts can cost a lot. So, the Zeus went the same way as the CCM...
There is almost no reason not to build a bike you love. At some point it may be desirable to go the Frankenbike route, and just build it so it works. There are no points for originality, compared to giving up, and hanging a perfectly buildable bike on the wall. This old Raleigh was built from a found, scrap metal frame. Turned out to be a '73 Super Course that I've enjoyed over 3000 miles on, including Eroica and several gravel rides easily keeping up with other modern bikes. Not original, but build it so it works. With Ebay, local Swap Meets, even Craigslist, the parts, or something just as useable (or even better) don't have to cost that much. Part of the hobby's fun is the thrill of the hunt, finding bargains, and putting it all together. This bike was my first build.

As found, cracked seatstay braze, stuck seat post, wierd stem and fork, ugly paint.

Completed bike, a great ride, pavement or gravel, almost no stock or original parts, but it all works.
Slightspeed is offline  
Old 11-23-19, 11:34 AM
  #21  
randyjawa 
Senior Member
 
randyjawa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada - burrrrr!
Posts: 10,575

Bikes: 1958 Rabeneick 120D, 1968 Legnano Gran Premio, 196? Torpado Professional, 2000 Marinoni Piuma

Mentioned: 182 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1020 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 745 Times in 459 Posts
There is almost no reason not to build a bike you love.
I totally disagree. There are a multitude of reasons, cost being right up there in my fixed income budget.
__________________
"98% of the bikes I buy are projects".
randyjawa is offline  
Old 11-23-19, 11:54 AM
  #22  
Wildwood
Veteran, Pacifist
 
Wildwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Seattle area
Posts: 10,809

Bikes: Bikes??? Thought this was social media?!?

Mentioned: 243 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2697 Post(s)
Liked 1,510 Times in 891 Posts
Something old, something new
Some NAHBS winner,
customed just for you.


build what you can afford.



not my cuppa, but.......... whoa!


Me, my oldest ride is just a late 1960ís Frejus frameset.


Last edited by Wildwood; 11-23-19 at 12:03 PM.
Wildwood is online now  
Likes For Wildwood:
Old 11-23-19, 12:02 PM
  #23  
gomango 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: STP
Posts: 15,160
Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 798 Post(s)
Liked 159 Times in 105 Posts
Originally Posted by Insidious C. View Post
Isn't trying to find parts part of the joy of the C&V hobby?
Yes, but so is clearing the basement of "extras" at this point.

Just too many unused parts.

I still love to ride though.

Just got back from riding my Yeti SB5 along the frozen river bottoms along the Mississippi and Minnesota rivers.

Can't believe how high the rivers are here in the Twin Cities.
__________________


Bikes and stuff

https://www.flickr.com/photos/36270004@N06/
gomango is offline  
Old 11-23-19, 12:03 PM
  #24  
clubman 
Youngman Grand
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 7,165

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 101 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1654 Post(s)
Liked 769 Times in 508 Posts
Randy has a point. 25 years ago this pseudo-restoration of a 37 Road Racer cost $600 with a Tony Beeks paint job and chrome and that was cheap. I had to build the wheels and source the bars, stem, saddle and light.

If it handled well, I would ride it. It doesn't so it's a wall hanger.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
RRacer10.jpg (1.38 MB, 252 views)
clubman is offline  
Likes For clubman:
Old 11-23-19, 12:22 PM
  #25  
iab
Senior Member
 
iab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: NW Burbs, Chicago
Posts: 10,653
Mentioned: 146 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2133 Post(s)
Liked 1,231 Times in 573 Posts
Originally Posted by clubman View Post
If it handled well, I would ride it. It doesn't so it's a wall hanger.
What about it doesn't handle well?
iab is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.