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1992 Colnago Master Olympic Art Decor

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1992 Colnago Master Olympic Art Decor

Old 11-27-19, 07:49 PM
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1992 Colnago Master Olympic Art Decor

Hey everyone,

Iím about to join the Classic and Vintage community. I was wondering if you guys could tell me a little about the bike I just purchased. I have been lusting over the Master Olympics for quite some time now. While cruising eBay, I came across a 1992 Colnago MASTER OLYMPIC Art Decor in the exact size I need and the color I have always wanted. It appears to be in great condition. Pics and description attached. Thanks for any info you all can provide.

The groupset is the classic Campagnolo Record 8 speed, with newer 1996 Campagnolo Atlanta rims
and Record hubs. The aero seatpost matches the groupset, and is topped with a classic 90's San Marco saddle.
The cockpit is a classic short 3ttt stem with matching 40cm handlebars.

The bike was built by us, and will undergo a further tuning in our workshop before shipping. Cables, chain
and bar tape are new. The bike is in good working order, and there are no technical issues. No cracks, bends or dents.

We've set the bike up according to our taste, with an intent of preserving the classic look and style. In saying that, if you
would like to make some small changes (saddle, bar tape etc), then often this is possible. We have a large inventory of
classic components acquired over the last 15 years.








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Old 11-27-19, 07:51 PM
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Oh lastly they will be replacing the 100mm stem with a 120mm and it is coming from Germany.
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Old 11-27-19, 08:09 PM
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I like the way you say it's the "exact color" you've always wanted - I count at least 7 different colors/shades! Ha ha - but yeah, this is a cool color scheme.

I noticed something right away that the description doesn't point out: the driveside rear dropout has been repaired. It probably had a crack which was fixed and the adjuster screw hole was filled in in the process. If that was not disclosed by the seller I'd be pretty upset.

Otherwise it looks in great condition with some superb components and should be quite a nice rider. Enjoy!

DD
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Old 11-27-19, 08:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Drillium Dude View Post
I like the way you say it's the "exact color" you've always wanted - I count at least 7 different colors/shades! Ha ha - but yeah, this is a cool color scheme.

I noticed something right away that the description doesn't point out: the driveside rear dropout has been repaired. It probably had a crack which was fixed and the adjuster screw hole was filled in in the process. If that was not disclosed by the seller I'd be pretty upset.

Otherwise it looks in great condition with some superb components and should be quite a nice rider. Enjoy!

DD
Thank you, no the seller did not disclose the repair on the drive side rear dropout. Does it look like it is still structurally sound? Is there an issue with not having an adjuster there? 😩
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Old 11-27-19, 08:18 PM
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Here is the other side. It appears to be missing the adjuster screw as well. Iím assuming these are necessary?



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Old 11-27-19, 08:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Drillium Dude View Post
I like the way you say it's the "exact color" you've always wanted - I count at least 7 different colors/shades! Ha ha - but yeah, this is a cool color scheme.

I noticed something right away that the description doesn't point out: the driveside rear dropout has been repaired. It probably had a crack which was fixed and the adjuster screw hole was filled in in the process. If that was not disclosed by the seller I'd be pretty upset.

Otherwise it looks in great condition with some superb components and should be quite a nice rider. Enjoy!

DD
Very well spotted DD and great advice - as usual.

If the repair was welded by someone who knows what they are doing there's no reason it wouldn't give many years of service. Cracks are rare in steel frames but this is one of the more 'common' crack areas. (Really not widespread - I've repaired similar cracks twice in that area over the past 50 years.)

It is a really attractive bike and I would lust after it too. I'd buy the bike without a third thought. (Second thought was the dropout and the fact that it wasn't disclosed.)

The adjuster screws keep the wheel in a constant position and really help in replacing the wheel to the same position each time. You may be able to get a rubber/plastic block to fit the RHS dropout slot giving a constant 'stop'. Sometimes you could find such a block on cheap 10 speed bikes. The LHS could still operate with the screw adjuster as normal giving you the angle adjustment.

Last edited by Gary Fountain; 11-27-19 at 08:40 PM.
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Old 11-27-19, 08:32 PM
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The rear axle is difficult to locate properly so that the wheel is centered in the dropouts if the screws are missing. In this case, the axle has nothing but the back of the dropout to back up against. Of course, the repair filled in one hole, so you'll have to figure out another way to get some sort of spacers in the dropout or something so that the wheel can be located correctly. You could play with it in the current configuration but there's always the chance of slippage, however slight, that might move the wheel and cause it to jam against one of the stays.

As far as the repair goes, it's impossible to tell the quality of the repair, but as Gary notes, this kind of repair is quite common. Sometimes the entire dropout is replaced, other times the crack is filled in. In this case, I'd have rather had a new dropout brazed in so that I could retain use of the adjusting screws. Personally, I think the repair looks pretty decent and whomever did it kept the heat low enough that the surrounding paint was barely touched. I'd be more concerned about functionality loss than joint integrity as that joint has more metal now than when original.

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Old 11-27-19, 08:32 PM
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That’s a good eye Jeff.

You might want to post a separate thread here to attract attention of folks with frame building and repair expertise. My guess is there was damage to the dropout and it wasn’t replaced due to the difficulty of fixing the fancy paint job. I’ve never ridden any of my horizontal dropout bikes without adjusters but I know it’s been done. It’s a simple repair to replace the dropout but it will burn the paint 5-7 cm around the dropout. That kind of damage does effect the value of the frame.

That being said, that’s an awesome bike. Great frameset and Campy Record 8 speed is one of my favorite groups.
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Old 11-27-19, 08:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Drillium Dude View Post
The rear axle is difficult to locate properly so that the wheel is centered in the dropouts if the screws are missing. In this case, the axle has nothing but the back of the dropout to back up against. Of course, the repair filled in one hole, so you'll have to figure out another way to get some sort of spacers in the dropout or something so that the wheel can be located correctly. You could play with it in the current configuration but there's always the chance of slippage, however slight, that might move the wheel and cause it to jam against one of the stays.

DD
That was my thought - I would want to ride it backed all the way into the dropout to avoid any slip and the wheel might be misaligned. Maybe judicious use of a dropout alignment tool could fix that.
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Old 11-27-19, 08:46 PM
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Thanks guys I really appreciate it. You have been very helpful.
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Old 11-27-19, 10:05 PM
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Very attractive machine and one that turns heads, even of non-cyclist.

Bit unfortunate of that dropout and I personally wouldn't let it 'slip' with the seller for non disclosing. Regardless of how it appears or holding together, value is lowered and will be a tougher sell down the road. Just a fact.

Anyways, there are solutions and where you can buy dropout axle stops. Below is a sample of my DIY to use on the poor designed dropout for a Viscount Aerospace Pro. They never produced it with adjuster screws or of any stop. Add insult to their poor design rear skewer - which commonly slipped.

Its a simple round blind nut with flats filed in to match the dropout slot. I simply loosen by the outer Allen socket screw and slide the stop to the desired position, then tighten. Works perfect.

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Old 11-27-19, 10:30 PM
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Originally Posted by crank_addict View Post
Very attractive machine and one that turns heads, even of non-cyclist.

Bit unfortunate of that dropout and I personally wouldn't let it 'slip' with the seller for non disclosing. Regardless of how it appears or holding together, value is lowered and will be a tougher sell down the road. Just a fact.

Anyways, there are solutions and where you can buy dropout axle stops. Below is a sample of my DIY to use on the poor designed dropout for a Viscount Aerospace Pro. They never produced it with adjuster screws or of any stop. Add insult to their poor design rear skewer - which commonly slipped.

Its a simple round blind nut with flats filed in to match the dropout slot. I simply loosen by the outer Allen socket screw and slide the stop to the desired position, then tighten. Works perfect.

Thatís a great idea. Where did you buy it? Iíll do some searching for dropout axle stops.

I donít plan on selling this. Last bike I sold was my first bike, a PGN-10 and I have regretted it.
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Old 11-27-19, 10:43 PM
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I've seen chainring bolts used for the same purpose. The nut is flanged and low profile, and the OD is 10mm, same as a rear axle.
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Old 11-27-19, 11:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Kuromori View Post
I've seen chainring bolts used for the same purpose. The nut is flanged and low profile, and the OD is 10mm, same as a rear axle.
Thatís actually a great idea.
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Old 11-28-19, 12:59 AM
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Any major city will have a guy who can drill and tap that dropout, and reinstall campy screws.
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Old 11-28-19, 01:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Reynolds 531 View Post
Any major city will have a guy who can drill and tap that dropout, and reinstall campy screws.
Sure, but would that be a good idea on a repaired dropout? I mean, that's precisely where the failure was begat the first go-around

Personally, I wouldn't take the chance but instead go with one of the two alternative suggestions for spacing. It would suck if it were drilled, tapped - then broke on the very first ride!

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Old 11-28-19, 06:43 AM
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From that picture it is difficult to tell if it is brazed or welded. I would agree with Drillium Dude if it is brazed.
If it is welded, then it would be an issue of penetration of the weld. If it is through and through, drill and tap would not be an issue. The stresses on that part of the DO are pretty small, so it doesn't take much to keep it in place. The clamping of the axle adds to the rigidity.

If you were to take it to a machine shop, they could assess the quality of the repair and make a suggestion of its fragility relative to the drill and tap operation.
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Old 11-28-19, 08:56 AM
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Thank you all again. I have addressed my concerns with the seller and am waiting for their reply. They seem to be very professional and accommodating from previous correspondence (100% rating on eBay)

I think I got a pretty good deal and didnít pay as much as some of the master olympics I see being sold given the condition of everything else, and components this has...then again Iím not an expert in vintage bikes like you guys. 52cm Masters seemed to be few and far between and the condition of the frame (minus the repaired dropout you guys caught) seemed to be very good.

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Old 11-29-19, 11:51 AM
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This is a hard one to assess with photos only...agree that the seller should have disclosed the repair in the add but it "was" in the pictures so maybe not much that you can do.
I am in agreement with almost all of the above with the exception of redrilling and taping the drop...I would center the wheel with the brakes and BB shell and be done with it, how often do you have the rear wheel off?
JMO, Ben

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Old 12-01-19, 07:29 AM
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If the DS dropout is farther "back" than the NDS, you will need to find a remedy. If it's farther "forward," you only need the NDS, anyway, but that's with the wheel all the way "back" in the dropout.

Not that big of an issue with the more vertical dropouts. Definitely an issue with more horizontal and longer dropouts.

Almost every frame I've checked, sans axle adjusters, has been biased to where only the NDS adjuster was needed, IF a person wamted to ride with the wheel that far back.
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Old 12-01-19, 10:22 AM
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Originally Posted by RobbieTunes View Post
If the DS dropout is farther "back" than the NDS, you will need to find a remedy. If it's farther "forward," you only need the NDS, anyway, but that's with the wheel all the way "back" in the dropout.

Not that big of an issue with the more vertical dropouts. Definitely an issue with more horizontal and longer dropouts.

Almost every frame I've checked, sans axle adjusters, has been biased to where only the NDS adjuster was needed, IF a person wamted to ride with the wheel that far back.
Not sure either side is further back. Looks to be uniform to me?
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Old 12-01-19, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Reynolds 531 View Post
Any major city will have a guy who can drill and tap that dropout, and reinstall campy screws.
This was my thought, but I was too slow.
Seems like the most logical option, and closest to retaining originality.
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Old 12-01-19, 11:15 AM
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axle stop/

campagnolo-been around for ages.beauty of a bike! https://www.euroasiaimports.com/prod...8-1-p21718.htm

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Old 12-01-19, 11:32 AM
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Originally Posted by jadocs View Post
Not sure either side is further back. Looks to be uniform to me?
They all look uniform until you put a wheel in there, pull it back fully to the rear, and then look at the gaps on both sides at the front of the chain stays, and up at the seat stays. They can still look fine and be off. Newer bikes seem to have this in hand, but older steel frames, not. A firm like Colnago likely has pretty close specs, but my '85 Colnago is far from perfectly uniform in that regard.

A 1mm difference at the rear creates a pretty crooked wheel. Climb hard, or brake hard, and you'll find out rather quickly, and a wheel that's not running straight will scrub the tire down much quicker. You can effectively have a toe-in/toe-out issue on the rear. Maybe not, maybe minute, but without an axle adjuster, on an older bike, it's either luck or a good builder who paid attention just prior to brazing it up.

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Old 12-01-19, 12:13 PM
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Originally Posted by RobbieTunes View Post
They all look uniform until you put a wheel in there, pull it back fully to the rear, and then look at the gaps on both sides at the front of the chain stays, and up at the seat stays. They can still look fine and be off. Newer bikes seem to have this in hand, but older steel frames, not. A firm like Colnago likely has pretty close specs, but my '85 Colnago is far from perfectly uniform in that regard.

A 1mm difference at the rear creates a pretty crooked wheel. Climb hard, or brake hard, and you'll find out rather quickly, and a wheel that's not running straight will scrub the tire down much quicker. You can effectively have a toe-in/toe-out issue on the rear. Maybe not, maybe minute, but without an axle adjuster, on an older bike, it's either luck or a good builder who paid attention just prior to brazing it up.
ok thanks that makes sense.
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