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Resto-mod ideas for a 1930's frame.... ???

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Resto-mod ideas for a 1930's frame.... ???

Old 01-24-20, 07:14 AM
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agustanz
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Resto-mod ideas for a 1930's frame.... ???

If you had 1930's frame and fork set you liked, and you wanted to build a usable, comfortable, upright roadster around those parts what modern features would you want to build in??

My working definition of "resto-mod" is restoring a bike whilst incorporating some modern (or at least newer then the build date) items that make the bike more usable, comfortable, safer etc. In a car build most of the modern stuff is hidden but in a bicycle it's all on display!

I am already thinking.... mechanical disc brakes, Nuvinci variable ratio rear hub, all aluminium parts replacing the old steel bits.... New Brooks B33 seat... Still looking at a glance like a vintage bike...

Thoughts?? Crazy ideas welcome.
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Old 01-24-20, 07:31 AM
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Not a lot of 1930s bikes still around...I would pick something newer to chop up, from the 60s or 70s maybe.

Mechanical disc brakes aren't that great. Good centerpull, cantilever, or dual pivot sidepulls are better than most mechanical discs. If you really want disc brakes, hydraulic discs are the only ones really worth the work. But even then they're pretty much unnecessary unless riding in muddy or rough terrain, which a "roadster" would not do.
​​​​
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Old 01-24-20, 07:34 AM
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I think disc brakes will increase the odds that a glance would not give the desired impression. I do like your concept here though. A couple things I would consider incorporating on this build (if I were doing it) are a dynamo hub and a custom retrofit LED lighting setup in authentic, refurbished lamp housings.

If you're going for a "stately" build, I suggest leather hand grips.
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Old 01-24-20, 07:51 AM
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Originally Posted by TenGrainBread View Post
Not a lot of 1930s bikes still around...I would pick something newer to chop up, from the 60s or 70s maybe.

Mechanical disc brakes aren't that great. Good centerpull, cantilever, or dual pivot sidepulls are better than most mechanical discs. If you really want disc brakes, hydraulic discs are the only ones really worth the work. But even then they're pretty much unnecessary unless riding in muddy or rough terrain, which a "roadster" would not do.
​​​​
No chopping up needed as I would be starting with a spare bare frame and fork.
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Old 01-24-20, 07:54 AM
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Originally Posted by USAZorro View Post
I think disc brakes will increase the odds that a glance would not give the desired impression. I do like your concept here though. A couple things I would consider incorporating on this build (if I were doing it) are a dynamo hub and a custom retrofit LED lighting setup in authentic, refurbished lamp housings.

If you're going for a "stately" build, I suggest leather hand grips.
Brooks leather hand grips are on my list... the black ones made with rings of leather with aluminium ends.
Was just going to have a rear reflector, 1930's red jewel type, in a custom made aluminium housing.
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Old 01-24-20, 08:00 AM
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Interesting idea
just buy a Raleigh Preston
super discounted now was over double at one point now $250 essentially!
local Raleigh dealer is ticked as he bought his inventory for a higher price. Ouch.
The way to lose $, sell new bikes.

https://www.raleighusa.com/preston/?...SABEgJ_o_D_BwE
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Old 01-24-20, 08:06 AM
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Originally Posted by repechage View Post
Interesting idea
just buy a Raleigh Preston
super discounted now was over double at one point now $250 essentially!
local Raleigh dealer is ticked as he bought his inventory for a higher price. Ouch.
The way to lose $, sell new bikes.

https://www.raleighusa.com/preston/?...SABEgJ_o_D_BwE
Good looking bike! But because of an old knee injury (motorcycle crash in 1994) I need to have more than one speed. Plus I love a project!
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Old 01-24-20, 08:15 AM
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https://www.pinterest.com/misterries...tm_medium=2004
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Old 01-24-20, 09:01 AM
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Originally Posted by agustanz View Post
Nuvinci variable ratio rear hub...Thoughts??...
Don't do it. These things are friction boxes. I built an N360 into a wheel for use on a commuter and it was absolutely awful. I estimate between 10 and 20% of my effort was lost in the hub. I rode it in the winter and the hub would warm up appreciably enough to melt snow and ice on it. Also they weigh a lot. Like 2.5kg or something, you can look up the specs on their latest model. If you want internal gears, my advice is to stick with a Shimano. The Nexus and Alfine 7 and 8 speed hubs are affordable, reliable, and easy to repair, and I've used them too and they seem tolerable.

I did a sort of restomod to a Raleigh DL-1 a while back, but then I put it all back to original and sold it. What I used was a Sturmey Archer drum brake/dynamo in front and a Shimano rollerbrake on an internally geared hub in back. I did not use a Sturmey Archer drum brake internally geared hub (modern offerings now I think are 5 and 8 speed) because of the way they do gear ratios: low gear is 1:1 and then subsequent gears are higher. Most internally geared hubs have a middle gear as 1:1. The Sturmey Archer offerings are thus good for small-wheeled bikes, but would require a funny looking drivetrain (smallish chainring) and possibly have more friction losses in the gears you use most.
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Old 01-24-20, 09:28 AM
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Originally Posted by scarlson View Post
Don't do it. These things are friction boxes. I built an N360 into a wheel for use on a commuter and it was absolutely awful. I estimate between 10 and 20% of my effort was lost in the hub. I rode it in the winter and the hub would warm up appreciably enough to melt snow and ice on it. Also they weigh a lot. Like 2.5kg or something, you can look up the specs on their latest model. If you want internal gears, my advice is to stick with a Shimano. The Nexus and Alfine 7 and 8 speed hubs are affordable, reliable, and easy to repair, and I've used them too and they seem tolerable. . What I used was a Sturmey Archer drum brake/dynamo in front and a Shimano rollerbrake on an internally geared hub in back. I did not use a Sturmey Archer drum brake internally geared hub (modern offerings now I think are 5 and 8 speed) because of the way they do gear ratios: low gear is 1:1 and then subsequent gears are higher. Most internally geared hubs have a middle gear as 1:1. The Sturmey Archer offerings are thus good for small-wheeled bikes, but would require a funny looking drivetrain (smallish chainring) and possibly have more friction losses in the gears you use most.
Interesting info. I am building it partly as a build project and partly for an interesting bike to get a little exercise on so I am not to worried about power lose in the hub. One option was a SA 5 speed that I happen to have....
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Old 01-24-20, 09:30 AM
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One thing I did a little reading on was a belt drive conversion... but rules them out for price....
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Old 01-24-20, 09:35 AM
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I don’t think a 1930’s fork could handle a disk brake. I’m assuming that is 120 spaced and a Nexus 3 speed hub would be a nice low profile upgrade.
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Old 01-24-20, 09:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Spaghetti Legs View Post
I dont think a 1930s fork could handle a disk brake. Im assuming that is 120 spaced and a Nexus 3 speed hub would be a nice low profile upgrade.
You are right about the original fork not taking the power of the disc brake. It had no brake on the front standard. The one I am going to use is a stronger replica of the original front fork that will cope with the disc brake.
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Old 01-24-20, 09:51 AM
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Further opinions...the Brooks leather grips are one of those current "retro-style" products that actually don't look like anything that was ever used on a vintage bike. If you want it to match the frame, you should do wood, rubber, or cotton grips. I recognize that you are doing a resto-mod, but I would avoid the fake-vintage style products. Just because it's silver or leather doesn't mean it looks "vintage".
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Old 01-24-20, 09:55 AM
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Originally Posted by TenGrainBread View Post
Further opinions...the Brooks leather grips are one of those current "retro-style" products that actually don't look like anything that was ever used on a vintage bike. If you want it to match the frame, you should do wood, rubber, or cotton grips. I recognize that you are doing a resto-mod, but I would avoid the fake-vintage style products. Just because it's silver or leather doesn't mean it looks "vintage".
Good points, I will think about that. Thanks.
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Old 01-24-20, 10:05 AM
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Originally Posted by agustanz View Post
Interesting info. I am building it partly as a build project and partly for an interesting bike to get a little exercise on so I am not to worried about power lose in the hub. One option was a SA 5 speed that I happen to have....
Old (indicator-chains, steel shell) or new (aluminum shell, cable) 5-speed? Both are good, and you have it so why not? I guess the new 5-speed even has the 1:1 gear in the middle of the range. Seems like I was wrong about that. I support that choice!
Either way, better than a NuVinci!
I thought the same thing about the NuVinci, that a workout might not be a bad thing. But pedaling against resistance and not going any faster (especially uphill) just killed my enthusiasm. You only get the exercise if you are in good enough spirits to actually go out and ride, and that hub broke me down.
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Old 01-24-20, 10:12 AM
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Something like this?

One site you may want to check out is ratrodbikes
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Old 01-24-20, 04:05 PM
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Originally Posted by agustanz View Post
One thing I did a little reading on was a belt drive conversion... but rules them out for price....
It also requires frame modification unless your 30's bike has removable stays.
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Old 01-24-20, 04:15 PM
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1938

claud butler,cycleart refinish,mavic 27" ma40's,campy der.'s-shifters.build it they way you want-not what others want.

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Old 01-24-20, 04:41 PM
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A friend sold me a 1930s Raleigh Sports frame for small money, and I essentially built it up with 1970s Raleigh Sports parts with a coaster-brake single-speed hub:



For this particularly frame, the angles were really slack, so the front wheel flop was very pronounced. Those steel Soma-copy of Lauterwasser bars help put weight on the front to stabilize the ride.
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Old 01-24-20, 04:56 PM
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Interesting concept.

It depends on the bike. Say around here, a 1950's Schwinn fat tire bike... cheap... why not?

I don't think I'd do disc brakes, but perhaps drum brakes or coaster brakes, or some combination of the two.



There was a term for vintage, say 1950's beach cruiser conversions to MTBs (converted in the 1980's). That could be fun.

"Klunkers"
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Old 01-24-20, 07:32 PM
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Originally Posted by agustanz View Post
You are right about the original fork not taking the power of the disc brake. It had no brake on the front standard. The one I am going to use is a stronger replica of the original front fork that will cope with the disc brake.
that is what fork braces are for
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Old 01-24-20, 07:48 PM
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Originally Posted by nlerner View Post
A friend sold me a 1930s Raleigh Sports frame for small money, and I essentially built it up with 1970s Raleigh Sports parts with a coaster-brake single-speed hub:



For this particularly frame, the angles were really slack, so the front wheel flop was very pronounced. Those steel Soma-copy of Lauterwasser bars help put weight on the front to stabilize the ride.
wheel flop IS a thing. Fine at speed.
of course what other bike can you run over curbs, wayward children and small dogs and not skip a stroke. Pardon the humor, just the visual seemed so in the realm.
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Old 01-24-20, 09:58 PM
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Originally Posted by repechage View Post
wheel flop IS a thing. Fine at speed.
of course what other bike can you run over curbs, wayward children and small dogs and not skip a stroke. Pardon the humor, just the visual seemed so in the realm.
I've ridden over a small dog.
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Old 01-25-20, 12:29 AM
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Originally Posted by scarlson View Post
Old (indicator-chains, steel shell) or new (aluminum shell, cable) 5-speed? Both are good, and you have it so why not? I guess the new 5-speed even has the 1:1 gear in the middle of the range. Seems like I was wrong about that. I support that choice!
Either way, better than a NuVinci!
I thought the same thing about the NuVinci, that a workout might not be a bad thing. But pedaling against resistance and not going any faster (especially uphill) just killed my enthusiasm. You only get the exercise if you are in good enough spirits to actually go out and ride, and that hub broke me down.
All great info. I don't know much about this "modern" (post 1950!!) stuff so I really appreciate the advice. I have done some looking and this seems to be the best option for me..... "Shimano Gear hub NEXUS 7-gear SG-C3001-7-D, 32 hole, 135 mm, silver" not expensive and should do the job.... the 5 speed SA I have is a drum brake and I want disc's front and back for sure....
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