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-   -   Choosing Mid 80s touring (https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/1193116-choosing-mid-80s-touring.html)

Egginahole 02-02-20 12:25 PM

Choosing Mid 80s touring
 
New member here! I've enjoyed reading a lot of old posts! I'm looking to get a new to me touring bike. I currently have a Felt F85,Surly Krampus, and a Burly Tandem.

My goal is to have a comfortable all arounder that I can ride to work with a day's lunch or maybe a light camping trip. A relaxed geometry is something I don't have with the other bikes.
I need to be able to fit racks and fenders together.

I'm 6'3 185 so finding a tall used bike is always a challenge.

I've happened to find a Raleigh Portage that appears to be an 1986 with the 650b. Used condition.

1984 Trek 620 frame and fork only at my local bike coop that they could help me piece together with used parts.

Believe an 1985 Miyata 610 garage queen.

Thanks for your feedback

dedhed 02-02-20 12:48 PM

https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...ing-bikes.html

plonz 02-02-20 01:45 PM

Welcome to the forum. Up for a project? I have a 62cm Specialized Expedition that I rode for a lot of years and unfortunately have let deteriorate. Stem is currently seized and it will need a repaint due to a lot of rust. Fresh decals are readily available and I still have all the 1983 pieces for it. It’s capable of being restored to its former glory but it will take some effort.

brian3069 02-02-20 01:54 PM

Assuming it's a 25" frame and the condition is good, the Portage would be a no brainer for me. But, you can't go wrong any of the three.

clubman 02-02-20 02:08 PM

Garage queen Miyata for me, if only to avoid super expensive 650B tires. That's a long term bike.

mstateglfr 02-02-20 03:09 PM

An 85 miyata 610 was a solid touring bike.
Personally, a lot would change for any of the bikes to make it a better fit for what I want/need.

- swap the 27" wheels for some modern quality 700c wheels with 36 spokes. A modern rim profile is inherently stronger/stiffer(whatever you want to call it) than 35 year old single wall box rims.
this will give you room for a larger tire too.

- modern aero brake levers and new brake pads for better/easier

- wider handlebar with modern compact bend for comfort and versatility.

- bar end shifters or STI shifters. Microshift or Shimano, whichever has best price for the drivetrain setup I want(3x9 for example) that gives good gesr range.



That list may seem like a lot, but it really isnt. Any bike you get will need to be completely overhauled due to age to ensure its greased and adjusted properly, so slapping on a handful of different t components while you are at it isnt too much extra work.

Egginahole 02-02-20 03:43 PM

I think the toughest part is these are all considered rare being 35 years old. I've never ridden any of them and they are all someone's favorite bike. Really hard to go wrong if they are in good condition.
I agree that they each need to be modernization in some capacity. I'm looking to use this bike not a show piece.

Price wise the Trek 620 frame and fork is $185. The coop felt confident I could build it with used parts for under $400.

Miyata 610 is $225

Raleigh Portage $200

I would like to stay within $400 on any of these. I will most likely be using the coop to help with any of these as my bike repair skills are pretty limited.
Other thought is to buy the Miyata and the Raleigh and sell one after. Looks like the market is still strong in some areas for these models.

jlaw 02-02-20 03:46 PM


Originally Posted by Egginahole (Post 21310259)
New member here! I've enjoyed reading a lot of old posts! I'm looking to get a new to me touring bike. I currently have a Felt F85,Surly Krampus, and a Burly Tandem.

My goal is to have a comfortable all arounder that I can ride to work with a day's lunch or maybe a light camping trip. A relaxed geometry is something I don't have with the other bikes.
I need to be able to fit racks and fenders together.

I'm 6'3 185 so finding a tall used bike is always a challenge.

I've happened to find a Raleigh Portage that appears to be an 1986 with the 650b. Used condition.

1984 Trek 620 frame and fork only at my local bike coop that they could help me piece together with used parts.

Believe an 1985 Miyata 610 garage queen.

Thanks for your feedback

I have a 1984 Trek 620. Be aware that the canti posts on the fork are very close together - approx. 60 mm - and this means that you may be limited to certain vintage brakes in order to get the nec. separation between the pads. These brakes can be found on ebay and elsewhere, but you need to know what to get. Comment #18 in the following post will provide some insight.
https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...ound-wild.html

Comment #18 on the following thread also has some helpful info.
https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...work-pics.html

Also, if you want to use 700c wheels on the Trek 620 (it came with 27") it will help to have brakes with up/down adjustment. 650b will not work on this Trek - the canti posts are too high on the fork.

Outside of this issue, the Trek 620 has comfortable geometry - made from 531cs Reynolds steel tubing - and can be readily updated to modern componentry if you wish It is one of the pinnacle designs of classic mid-80's touring bikes. Given your height, you will probably want the 24" or 25.5" frame.

Here is the original brochure: https://vintage-trek.com/images/trek/84Trek3Touring.pdf

The Raleigh Portage and the Miyata 610 are also nice bikes, but I have no experience with them.

Good Luck.

RH Clark 02-02-20 03:52 PM

I would be all over that Portage just based on reputation. I don't have any touring experience. I'm pretty bad to research a thing to death before jumping and I have heard lots of good on that bike.

$200 don't seem like much these days. Am I crazy but have bike prices on Facebook went way up in just the last 2 years? It seems like the ripple started with new bikes and has really stirred up the used market, at least to me.

clubman 02-02-20 05:08 PM


Originally Posted by Egginahole (Post 21310507)
I think the toughest part is these are all considered rare being 35 years old. I've never ridden any of them and they are all someone's favorite bike. Really hard to go wrong if they are in good condition.
I agree that they each need to be modernization in some capacity. I'm looking to use this bike not a show piece.

Price wise the Trek 620 frame and fork is $185. The coop felt confident I could build it with used parts for under $400.

Miyata 610 is $225

Raleigh Portage $200

I would like to stay within $400 on any of these. I will most likely be using the coop to help with any of these as my bike repair skills are pretty limited.
Other thought is to buy the Miyata and the Raleigh and sell one after. Looks like the market is still strong in some areas for these models.

None of these are expensive so go take a ride on them (soon!) and pick one. Can't overthink it.

bikemig 02-02-20 05:14 PM

I like all 3 bikes but I'd opt for the complete bikes (Raleigh and Miyata) over the project (Trek frame and fork). As between the Raleigh and Miyata, I'd go for the Miyata mainly because of the 650b wheels. Fat tires are good on a touring bike.

Egginahole 02-02-20 05:22 PM


Originally Posted by bikemig (Post 21310628)
I like all 3 bikes but I'd opt for the complete bikes (Raleigh and Miyata) over the project (Trek frame and fork). As between the Raleigh and Miyata, I'd go for the Miyata mainly because of the 650b wheels. Fat tires are good on a touring bike.

Do you mean Raleigh because of the 650b, Miyata has 27" stock.

bikemig 02-02-20 05:34 PM


Originally Posted by Egginahole (Post 21310644)
Do you mean Raleigh because of the 650b, Miyata has 27" stock.

right, The 650b will let run a fatter tire and you will have more tire choices

Egginahole 02-02-20 05:35 PM

The Miyata is listed as a 25 inch. It's for sale about 6 hours away but I have a connection to the location via a coworkers brother. I would only be able to ride it after the sale.
The Raleigh ilisted as 25 inch and a bit over an hour away.
Trek is listed as 64cm I could stand over it with some random wheels under it. Not sure is 64 is accurate size for 84?

​​​​​​I have just over 34 inseam. Stand over is no prob. I just don't want to long of a reach which would ruin the whole point of a comfortable touring bike

Hobbiano 02-02-20 10:03 PM

If the Portage and the Miyata 610 are both in nice shape, I'd get them both - then try to decide which one I liked best. Those are good prices for great bikes.

Egginahole 02-02-20 10:09 PM

This 650b set up is sounding more favorable. Our tandem is rolling on 700x38.love that set up comfortable and stable. I'm quite confident the Miyata or Trek can't roll that size and fenders. While given the extra volume of 650b and pictures I've seen it sure looks possible to have fenders.

nlerner 02-02-20 10:27 PM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 21310388)
Garage queen Miyata for me, if only to avoid super expensive 650B tires. That's a long term bike.

Well, you can get perfectly fine 650b x 38mm Pacenti Pari-Moto tires at Target for $36 each. Not as cheap as 700c Paselas but still a lot less than Compass/Herse.

escii_35 02-02-20 10:31 PM

Yes, to the triple and quad butted mid eighties miyatas. However, in the 25in size I love a Cannondale. Unloaded the Cannondale's can be harsh but in loaded mode they sing.

Chr0m0ly 02-03-20 12:33 AM

^^^
Good point, the larger Cannondales are pretty choice. Especially for loaded touring, those phat tubes don't wobble!

I have two Cannondale ST's, an '84 Miyata 610, and an '84 Trek 620.

First off, the Trek is either a 24" or a 25.5" size. I'd double check that size because if it's the 24" it might be a bit small for you.

The Raleigh I have no experience with. Personally I think a 650b wheelset would be awesome, and there are some pretty sweet tires being made in that size. They're "in" at the moment.

The '85 610 is sweet bike. My '84 has a Hi-ten fork, but in '85 they up graded to a Manga-lite fork. It makes a stout bike even stronger.

If you want to do serious fully loaded tours I'd tell you to go for the Miyata over the Trek. The '84 Trek has an .8 .5 .8 butted top tube, and they can be a little flexy in the larger sizes. My Trek is a 24" and it's a touch sensitive to weight placement.

You'll also be able to fit wider rubber on the Miyata. Without fenders my '84 Miyata will just pass 700cx41mm tires. I haven't maxed out my Trek but I don't think you could go much fatter than 700x32mm, possibly 35mm. That gets you 35/38mm with fenders on the Miyata and 28mm (32 if you're lucky) on the Trek.

Lascauxcaveman 02-03-20 01:27 AM

I'd go for the Portage, too, for the fatter tires. But I'd expect it to be a pound or two heavier than the Miata. Really, I'd like to buy both, then decide. Keep the on you like best; or keep both.

OTOH, if you weigh only 185, you may not feel the need for fatter tires on an "all arounder," so the 27" x 1 1/4 tires on the Miata may be plenty for you.

Pcampeau 02-03-20 01:42 AM

I am waiting for the day when I find a Raleigh Portage for only $200!

eom 02-03-20 07:35 AM

Where do you live. If you are close to me, I have two that should fit you and are welcome to test ride. Miyata Two Ten with 38-622 tires or My Trek 520 Cirrus with 83-584 tires.


https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...15fc90ca8.jpeg


https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...37052597b6.jpg

Egginahole 02-03-20 08:18 AM

I'm still not allowed to post photos so I looked over the Fork of the Miyata. It has the (1024) sticker so high tension steel fork? Possibly an 1984 that the guy bought in 1985. Slight bummer, bike is a dark blue. I'm still waiting to see the frame stickers as they are not visible.

​​​​​​

cooperryder 02-03-20 08:24 AM

Another category of bike that lends itself to
a variety of builds and configurations that could serve in this capacity are the non suspended vintage mountain bikes.

Many cool bikes to see on these threads.

Great thread here on them converted to drop bars:
http://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vi...nversions.html

Thread here on various upright bar conversions:

http://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vi...nversions.html

As to a Miyata 610 I picked one up about a month ago and changed it up quite a bit and really like it. It's the coppery brownish one in the first pics.

http://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vi...l#post21311212

The hybrid bikes from the 90's are also great for a variety of configurations and fatter tires.

Good luck and safe riding with whatever bike you select.

jlaw 02-03-20 10:13 AM


Originally Posted by Egginahole (Post 21310661)
Trek is listed as 64cm I could stand over it with some random wheels under it. Not sure is 64 is accurate size for 84?


If the seller gives you the serial# of the Trek, you can find the size, model, and date of manufacture here: https://vintage-trek.com/SerialNumbers.htm

The 620 should take 700x35mm without fenders and possibly 700x32 with fenders (depending upon the particular fender and mounting.


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