Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

50 Years Ago: March 1970 in Bicycling! magazine

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

50 Years Ago: March 1970 in Bicycling! magazine

Old 03-08-20, 09:07 AM
  #1  
SpeedofLite 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
SpeedofLite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Henderson, NV, USA
Posts: 1,293

Bikes: Litespeed (9); Slingshot (6); Specialized (2); Kestrel (2); Softride (1); Centurion (3); Cervelo (1); FELT (1); Cannondale (1); Fuji (1); Trek (1)

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 305 Post(s)
Liked 851 Times in 393 Posts
50 Years Ago: March 1970 in Bicycling! magazine

Articles presented in this thread are "Portland, OR to Portland, ME" (father and son ride across most of the US in 1969), "Derailleur Reliability" (Fred DeLong), and "Children's Art Contest", a cute and creepy time capsule.
See if you can find the creepy.

As usual, let me know if you'd like to see something else listed in the ToC and I'll do my best to send you a pdf.
Just send me a PM that includes your email address.

















__________________
WTB: Slingshot road model (1990s era; 18" L or 20" XL frame size)
WTB: Slingshot promotional documents (catalog, pamphlets, etc).
WTB: American Cycling May - Aug, Oct, Dec 1966.
WTB: Bicycle Guide issues 1984 (any); Jun 1987; Jul 1992; 1993-1998 (any)
WTB: Bike World issue Jun 1974.
WTB: ZIPP 500 front wheel (650c clincher)









SpeedofLite is online now  
Old 03-08-20, 09:21 AM
  #2  
52telecaster
ambulatory senior
 
52telecaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Peoria Il
Posts: 3,418

Bikes: Bob Jackson World Tour, Falcon and lots of other bikes.

Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1063 Post(s)
Liked 448 Times in 263 Posts
Nazi flag? Wow...
52telecaster is offline  
Old 03-08-20, 09:45 AM
  #3  
SpeedofLite 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
SpeedofLite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Henderson, NV, USA
Posts: 1,293

Bikes: Litespeed (9); Slingshot (6); Specialized (2); Kestrel (2); Softride (1); Centurion (3); Cervelo (1); FELT (1); Cannondale (1); Fuji (1); Trek (1)

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 305 Post(s)
Liked 851 Times in 393 Posts
Originally Posted by 52telecaster View Post
Nazi flag? Wow...
Sadly, yes.
__________________
WTB: Slingshot road model (1990s era; 18" L or 20" XL frame size)
WTB: Slingshot promotional documents (catalog, pamphlets, etc).
WTB: American Cycling May - Aug, Oct, Dec 1966.
WTB: Bicycle Guide issues 1984 (any); Jun 1987; Jul 1992; 1993-1998 (any)
WTB: Bike World issue Jun 1974.
WTB: ZIPP 500 front wheel (650c clincher)









SpeedofLite is online now  
Old 03-08-20, 09:46 AM
  #4  
sheddle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Seattle
Posts: 1,410

Bikes: my precious steel boys

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 431 Post(s)
Liked 573 Times in 341 Posts
Looks like Ugo's slightly less famous brother on the top right there.
sheddle is offline  
Old 03-08-20, 06:37 PM
  #5  
Vintage Schwinn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 345
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 153 Times in 101 Posts
The Shimano built GT-100 for Schwinn !!!
Schwinn engineers had Shimano build a derailleur that had Lark quality, that had none of the junkiness of the Huret Al lvit, even though Schwinn had Shimano keep it somewhat similar to the Huret Allvit. Schwinn engineers also had Shimano incorporate a massive bash guard and cable saver feature.
The GT-100 is an extremely durable and reliable rear derailleur that can easily shift the 32 tooth first gear sprocket.
Shimano engineers took the Schwinn bash guard and cable saver demands to heart and they incorporated these into the Shimano Skylark and Shimano Eagle
rear derailleurs which were refinements/advancements to Shimano's (1967) Lark derailleur.

The GT-100 was original equipment only on the FIVE SPEED 1970 Schwinn Suburban -and- the 1970 Schwinn Collegiate.
The 1970 Varsity and Continental as well as the Ten Speed Suburban came with the junky Huret Allvit.
For the majority of the Seventies, the Varsity, Continental and many other Raleigh and other respected European names, came with these inferior Huret, Simplex, or Campagnolo rear derailleurs. The Paramount was Campy equipped but everyone on the planet had realized by 1972 that Maeda SUNTOUR and SHIMANO rear derailleurs were by far the best in the world at any price point. By 1977, the Japanese had wiped out the Europeans because their engineering was three times better and amazingly three times better at half the cost!
It didn't take long for those with the fancy European nameplate bikes to realize in 1972, 1973, 1974..... woah, oh, oh, my little sister's new Kmart 10 speed has a Japanese rear derailleur that is three times better than the rear derailleur on my euro bike that cost six times as much as that Kmart special.

Anyway, the GT-100 was 1970 to very early 1974 on the FIVE SPEED Schwinn Suburban and FIVE SPEED Schwinn Collegiate.
Occasionally, a Varsity might come off the production line with the GT-100 if the production line supply of Allvits was out.
A great many Schwinn dealers would replace malfunctioning Allvits with the GT-100. Other bike shops would do the same, or else something Japan made like SUNTOUR, or Shimano Lark, Shimano Skylark, or Shimano Eagle.

In 1974, the GT-120, replaced the GT-100.
The GT-120 would have the typical SHIMANO high and low limit screw location, and the massive bash guard and cable saver feature.


It is hard to explain to anyone under 60 years of age today that the Japanese went from nothing after WWII, to manufacturing near trash, initially in the 1950's, to a stunning revolutionary electronics takeover that began about 1964-1965 because products from SONY and Matsu****a (National-PANASONIC, and from about '75 Technics) were just so much better and more advanced than everyone else's. SONY and PANASONIC products at the time in the mid sixties to late sixties were
much more expensive than other brands, and their sales rapidly expanded because they were worth every penny and at least five years ahead of everyone else in the industry. In 1968, SONY introduced the Trinitron color tv which made all other color televisions obsolete overnight, because they could not match the picture quality.
Tape decks, Stereo receivers, hi-fi components, radios, tape players, televisions, and beginning with the 1968 Datsun 510, the 1970 240 Z, and once Toyota had developed complete reliability with the 1971 Corolla, the Japanese would not be stopped wiping out OPEL as the second best selling import in USA, and destroying
new garbage domestic import fighters in the US marketplace and destroying VW and taking the #1 import spot in just a few years. People forget that VW had 14% of the US marketplace in 1974 and they brought forth a revolutionary, totally modern, great design first with the Dasher and then in late '74 intro for 1975 Rabbit in USA. The problem was VW new revolutionary vehicles were somewhat problematic as had the 1968- 1970 Corolla had been. Leave it to the Japanese to copy and do it better, as they were able to perfect fwd small cars by 1979 as they had done with small rwd cars by 1971. Yes, the Japanese certainly benefitted with the Yen relative to the US dollar in the mid to late seventies, versus the German mark versus the US dollar during that time.
Needless to explain more, as the Japanese simply were masters at engineering the best quality. It didn't matter if it was an economy model or a high end model because the product was built to last. The Japanese were the best at recognizing what was the best existing product to essentially copy and make improvements to.
Hey, once they figured out how to make larger vehicles that had interior space that most Americans demand, they grabbed more and more of the US market because their vehicles were far better than the poorly engineered vehicles from Motown. Motown and the Europeans are still trying to catch up to the product quality of the Japanese and now the other Asian marques.


.......................It was 50 years ago today, that Shimano told everyone it was great.......


Even Billy Shears would not be riding anything at all with a Huret, Simplex, or Campagnolo rear derailleur!
Vintage Schwinn is offline  
Likes For Vintage Schwinn:
Old 03-09-20, 12:40 PM
  #6  
noobinsf 
Senior Member
 
noobinsf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 2,524

Bikes: '82 Univega Competizione, '72 Motobecane Grand Record, '83 Mercian KOM Touring, '85 Univega Alpina Uno, '76 Eisentraut Limited

Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 785 Post(s)
Liked 590 Times in 388 Posts
Originally Posted by 52telecaster View Post
Nazi flag? Wow...
Originally Posted by SpeedofLite View Post
Sadly, yes.
No, I don't think so. The Nazis used the symbol rotated 45 degrees. The swastika appears all over ancient Eastern cultures as a symbol of good luck, and my guess is that a kid submitting art to a bicycling magazine in 1970 likely had parents who were either immigrants using the symbol regularly with no connection to Nazism or were peaceniks who adopted Eastern symbols. I doubt a sinister intent.

BIG EDIT: Not seeking to start a debate, just to correct the record. Back to bikes!
noobinsf is online now  
Old 03-09-20, 02:29 PM
  #7  
sykerocker 
Senior Member
 
sykerocker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Ashland, VA
Posts: 4,349

Bikes: The keepers: 1958 Raleigh Lenton Grand Prix, 1968 Ranger, 1969 Magneet Sprint, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1973 Raleigh Tourist, 3 - 1986 Rossins, and a '77 PX-10 frame in process.

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 200 Post(s)
Liked 149 Times in 90 Posts
Originally Posted by 52telecaster View Post
Nazi flag? Wow...
Quite a thing for kids back in the Sixties, and no political pretense was meant by that. It mainly came from either all those American International biker films, or, if you were a WWII buff the German equipment just seemed so much neater than the British or American.

I seriously doubt one 8-16 year old kid meant anything political by it. And what Nazi's there were at the time in America were the George Lincoln Rockwell bunch, aptly parodied by The Blues Brothers. For the most part, that's how the average American back then considered them.
__________________
Syke

“No one in this world, so far as I know — and I have searched the records for years, and employed agents to help me — has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people. Nor has anyone ever lost public office thereby.”

H.L. Mencken, (1926)

sykerocker is offline  
Old 03-09-20, 04:34 PM
  #8  
SpeedofLite 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
SpeedofLite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Henderson, NV, USA
Posts: 1,293

Bikes: Litespeed (9); Slingshot (6); Specialized (2); Kestrel (2); Softride (1); Centurion (3); Cervelo (1); FELT (1); Cannondale (1); Fuji (1); Trek (1)

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 305 Post(s)
Liked 851 Times in 393 Posts
Originally Posted by noobinsf View Post
No, I don't think so. The Nazis used the symbol rotated 45 degrees. The swastika appears all over ancient Eastern cultures as a symbol of good luck, and my guess is that a kid submitting art to a bicycling magazine in 1970 likely had parents who were either immigrants using the symbol regularly with no connection to Nazism or were peaceniks who adopted Eastern symbols. I doubt a sinister intent.

BIG EDIT: Not seeking to start a debate, just to correct the record. Back to bikes!
Originally Posted by sykerocker View Post
Quite a thing for kids back in the Sixties, and no political pretense was meant by that. It mainly came from either all those American International biker films, or, if you were a WWII buff the German equipment just seemed so much neater than the British or American.

I seriously doubt one 8-16 year old kid meant anything political by it. And what Nazi's there were at the time in America were the George Lincoln Rockwell bunch, aptly parodied by The Blues Brothers. For the most part, that's how the average American back then considered them.
Thanks for your comments. I understand what both of you are saying. I did not know about the symbol being used in unoffensive ways, so I immediately saw it as a Nazi swastika. That said, the child who drew this was 11yo, so I didn't even think about political intent by the child. My thoughts started with "Swastika bad", proceeded to "Where are the parents and the school in all of this?", and ended with "What was Bicycling! thinking by publishing this drawing?". Quite frankly, even though you've taught me there can be a harmless explanation for this, I'm not sure it makes me feel any different, at least without having some context provided with the drawing.
__________________
WTB: Slingshot road model (1990s era; 18" L or 20" XL frame size)
WTB: Slingshot promotional documents (catalog, pamphlets, etc).
WTB: American Cycling May - Aug, Oct, Dec 1966.
WTB: Bicycle Guide issues 1984 (any); Jun 1987; Jul 1992; 1993-1998 (any)
WTB: Bike World issue Jun 1974.
WTB: ZIPP 500 front wheel (650c clincher)









SpeedofLite is online now  
Old 03-09-20, 05:32 PM
  #9  
Velo Mule
Senior Member
 
Velo Mule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 1,218

Bikes: Trek 800 x 2, Schwinn Heavy Duti, Schwinn Traveler, Schwinn Le Tour Luxe, Schwinn Continental and Cannondale M400

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 409 Post(s)
Liked 309 Times in 240 Posts
Interesting, one of the children contributing was Daniel Vicentin. I would think from Vicentin's bike shop on Long Island.

I was 10 in 1970. We used to play "Army" were we would choose sides and reenact world war II combat like we saw in movies. Someone had to be the Nazi's. We were also aware of German war equipment at the time because we made models of planes and tanks. I don't think a Swastika would be so out of place in 1970. It was not political. It was just that our fathers were all WWII vets and this was part of our culture. If you were of the age at the time you might remember a custom car with a Nazi helmet as the cover over the driver and passenger. I believe it was called the Red Baron. It was available as a model and I believe as a Hot Wheel car.
Velo Mule is online now  
Old 03-09-20, 06:04 PM
  #10  
Velo Mule
Senior Member
 
Velo Mule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 1,218

Bikes: Trek 800 x 2, Schwinn Heavy Duti, Schwinn Traveler, Schwinn Le Tour Luxe, Schwinn Continental and Cannondale M400

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 409 Post(s)
Liked 309 Times in 240 Posts
It took a little to get back to 1970 and now some tidbits are coming to the front of my brain. Rowan and Martin's Laugh in was a big hit back then. One of the segments that they had on each show was "Sock-it-to-me". You will notice that that is what is spelled out on the banana seat of the picture that we are talking about.

Rowan and Martin also had a regular Nazi character and they also had skits depicting Nazis. See the link below:


There was (I think it was called) "Hogan's Hero's". It was a TV show set in a Nazi prison camp. It was light stuff. Probably not what you would think if you were not around in 1970. It was part of the culture of that time.
Velo Mule is online now  
Old 03-09-20, 06:47 PM
  #11  
bobwysiwyg
Senior Member
 
bobwysiwyg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: 961' 42.28° N, 83.78° W (A2)
Posts: 2,344

Bikes: Mongoose Selous, Trek DS

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 941 Post(s)
Liked 318 Times in 188 Posts
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swastika
bobwysiwyg is offline  
Old 03-10-20, 02:44 AM
  #12  
52telecaster
ambulatory senior
 
52telecaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Peoria Il
Posts: 3,418

Bikes: Bob Jackson World Tour, Falcon and lots of other bikes.

Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1063 Post(s)
Liked 448 Times in 263 Posts
I am quite aware of the use of the swastika in pop culture back then. I was born in 1956. My father was a ww2 vet who didnt see the humor in hogans heros and would have highly dissaproved of any swastikas on anything i had or made. He saw it in the culture and the iron crosses in biker movies. He was not favorably impressed. My dad however was great about picking up disgarded bikes and making them great riders for his 6 kids.

Serving in ww2 had a huge impact on him. It resonates in me today for good and bad.
52telecaster is offline  
Likes For 52telecaster:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.